The list below contains all courses in the Franklin Academic Catalog.  Many of the courses below are offered only periodically or in alternate years. Course offerings for each semester are published as schedules become available. All courses carry three academic credits unless otherwise specified.

See the Undergraduate Courses page in the Office of the Registrar section to view scheduled courses for upcoming semesters.

Course Catalog

Course Catalog

Academic Literacies

AYF 100 Exploring Academic Disciplines

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of a liberal arts education at Franklin and prepares them to make the most of the academic resources available. Organized according to a modular structure and featuring guest lectures by Franklin faculty, AYF 100 guides students in their transition to university life. The course is designed to help students explore various academic disciplines as well as the learning strategies required for a successful college experience. It provides students with a solid foundation in understanding college-level expectations and emphasizes strategies for independent learning. Required for students in the Academic Year at Franklin (AYF) program

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EAP 120 Introduction to Academic Writing I

This course aims to help students improve their academic writing skills. Particular attention is given to awareness and development of academic writing structures, from essay organization to paragraph development to sentence-level detailing. Students also learn the basic conventions of evaluation and incorporation of outside resources. This course is taken in conjunction with EAP 125. A student who successfully completes EAP 120 (with a minimum final grade of C) must take EAP 130 the following semester.

EAP 125 Academic Reading and Vocabulary

The aim of this course is to help students improve their analysis and comprehension of academic texts, and to develop strategies for efficient intake, processing and interpretation of information. Special emphasis is placed on notetaking strategies and on the critical analysis of texts. This course is taken in conjunction with EAP 120

EAP 128 Academic Literacy and Essay Writing

This course is designed to further students understanding of the literacies required for academic study at the university level. Focusing on the close connection between reading texts and writing about them, the course develops students' ability to translate and interpret text content and structure, and to produce a variety of written responses. Students will consider the contextual use of language in academic settings, learn to identify key themes and ideas, follow and analyze arguments, and to prioritize information. They will also practice writing about these texts in controlled assignments that emphasize the construction of a thesis statement and supporting argument. Offered in spring semester.

EAP 130 Introduction to Academic Writing II

This course is designed to help students further develop the critical thinking and writing skills so important in academic writing. It looks at best practices for research and use of information, including evaluation and effective incorporation of outside sources through paraphrases, summary, and correct citation formats, and addresses the development of structure and expression in academic writing and techniques for effectively sharing information in both written and oral forms. Upon successful completion of EAP 130 (with a minimum final grade of C), students must take WTG 100 the following semester.

EAP 150 English Preparation for University Studies

This course prepares students for study at an English-speaking university by developing the necessary skills for a non-native speaker to participate in an academic setting with confidence. In particular, this course will develop and strengthen skills in: oral presentations, reading academic texts, academic vocabulary, advanced grammar structures, writing short papers, and using citations. Not for students who have already completed the EAP 120-125 sequence.

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WTG 100 Academic Writing: Crossing Borders

Designed as a discussion/workshop seminar, this writing course develops students awareness of scholarly discourse and their participation in it: what makes academic discourse different from other kinds of writing, how different disciplines approach analysis and evidence, and what counts as effective communication within scholarly communities. Through the study of borders -- what they are, how they shape culture, politics and society, and why they change -- the course helps students develop academic communication strategies that are applicable across the curriculum at Franklin. The main focus of the course is to help students develop strategies for joining the academic conversation, covering skills such as close reading and responding to texts; generating, supporting and sharing ideas in both oral and written form; and scholarly researching. Drawing from a wide selection of texts and media about cross-border and cross cultural practices, which has recently garnered much attention among scholars and speaks to the Franklin mission, students will explore various academic responses to the phenomenon of border crossing, concluding with a research-based final project and defense. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing core requirement.)

WTG 200 Advanced Academic Writing: Ethics at Work

This advanced writing course consolidates students academic communication skills through the theme of business and work ethics. Students will engage with philosophical texts and case studies dealing with various aspects of business and/or work ethics -- distributive justice, social responsibility and environmentally conscious business practices among others -- in order to improve critical reading, argumentative writing, and oral presentation/debating skills. The course helps students understand that academic communication primarily involves entering a conversation with others and particular emphasis will be placed on responding to other peoples arguments as well as developing their own arguments based on those responses. Using the broad theme of business and work ethics as a medium for discussion, students will not only explore what it means to join an academic community and their role in that community as purveyors of knowledge but also work towards entering the job/internship market with polished application materials. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

WTG 295 Faculty Fellows Summer Program

Faculty Fellows Program courses are offered in the Summer sessions. Specific course offerings vary from year to year.

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Art History

AHT 102 Introduction to Art History and Visual Culture I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance

The course offers an introduction to the history of art and visual culture from antiquity to the Renaissance. It studies painting, sculpture, architecture, and prints within their historical, social, and cultural contexts, as well as their representation in modern media (film, documentary, etc).

AHT 103 Introduction to Art History and Visual Culture II: High Renaissance to Contemporary Art

The course is the sequel to AHT 102 and offers an introduction to the history of art and visual culture from the High Renaissance to the present day. It studies early modern painting, sculpture, architecture, and prints within their historical, social, and cultural contexts, as well as photography and new media in the modern and contemporary world.

AHT 199 First Year Seminar

Seminar topics change year to year. Please consult the Schedule of Classes for current seminar offerings.

AHT 211 Collecting and the Art Market in the Age of Globalization

The globalization of the art market and the hunt for status symbols of new collectors have driven art prices through the roof. Were these prices higher than they should have been? Who really knows how to scientifically convert cultural into monetary value? Is the modern art market promoting the production of art for financial speculation? Do artists produce for the market or for poetic reasons? What are the implications for museums and its art-interested public? Is the art market fostering the illicit trade of stolen and looted antiquities? How will the art market react to the world financial crisis? These are some of the issues the course addresses, together with looking at collecting from a historical point of view: princely and scholarly collections in the Renaissance, the Wunderkammer, the birth of the public art museum and the invention of the private art market. Students will furthermore be encouraged to explore the museum culture of Lugano and topics such as women collectors, the Venice Biennale, and the major art fairs

AHT 213 Art and Ideas: Exploring Vision

The course departs from the question of whether vision is simply what the external world imprints on our retina or if it is a cultural construct? Is it purely physiological or can we speak of a history or histories of the eye? How do culture, science, and ethnicity influence what we see and how se see it? Keeping these questions in mind the course studies aspects of vision (perception, reception, revelation, blindness) - both from an empirical and from an historical point of view. Besides practical exercises related to the seeing eye, the course examines the discovery of perspective in the Renaissance, the invention of the Baroque theater, gender and gaze in modernity, and optical instruments of the Enlightenment as precursors for modern photography and film.

AHT 215T Art and Industry in England: 1800-2000

This course explores the relation between the visual arts and British industrial development in the course of the 19th and 20th century. It will consider the representation of a changing landscape in painting and prints, the encounter of aesthetics with the scientific innovation and spirit of the industrial age, the creation of Victorian museums, galleries and art collections within the rapidly developing industrial city. It will also discuss resistance to these changes, as exemplified by the art of the Pre-Raphaelites and the writings of John Ruskin. Secondly, the course investigates the emergence of post-industrial cultural economies in the second half of the 20th century, placing emphasis on visual and aesthetic responses. It addresses the impact of late 20th century regeneration strategies on the cultural field, putting a particular emphasis on the development of contemporary art from the 1980s onward. Thus the course aims to further the students' knowledge of artistic developments in England and Britain during the period, while stressing these developments interactive relation with socio-political and economic history.

AHT 216 Introduction to the History of Photography

This course offers an introduction to the history of photography from its inception in the early 19th century to the present day. It considers the specific historical development of the photographic medium through the evolution of both its technical possibilities during the period and the range of its applications. The course will question past and present readings of photographs, while reflecting on the peculiar modes of representation implied by the use of the daguerreotype, the calotype and the negative-positive photographic process, the commercialization of photographic equipment in the early 20th century, the introduction of the Kodacolour film in 1942, and the changes in the late 20th century with the introduction of the digital camera. It will consider a set of different objects favored by the medium, such as the landscape, the city, the portrait, the body, taking into account the historical socio-political contexts in which these various photographic practices developed. It will consider the history of genres within photography: documentary photography, photography as fine art, photography in advertising and media, fashion photography, as well as its archival and historical documentation. Finally, the course will emphasize the question of the impact and influence of photography on other artistic mediums, such as painting and literature, as well as on the modern and contemporary experience of the world.

AHT 218T Harbor Cities: Architecture, Vision, and Experience

Oceans, seas and rivers have long provided resources favorable to the growth of urban settlements. Cities built on water shores use natural fluxes as passageways for bodies, goods and ideas from a privileged position. Their harbors became gateways to both wealth and the unknown. This course will focus on the modes of representations of the harbor city in the 20th century, placing particular emphasis on the role of imagination in its past, present and future construction. In the 19th and 20th centuries, radical and rapid changes in maritime technology and the geographies of the world economy prompted dramatic transformations in the functionalities and the identities of harbor cities across the globe. The proud jewels of the economie-monde in the Mediterranean as well as many of the industrial bastions of the 19th century empires fell into decline, while emerging economies prompted fast-paced development of their sea-linked cities to accommodate emerging trade. Throughout this process, the relation of harbor cities to their self-perceived identity significantly evolved. A sole focus on a citys desires and assets has become unviable. For the once remote outside world has found multiple paths of its own making to gain access to the citys shores. The course will consider the array of visions drawn by artists, poets, architects, urban planners, politicians, entrepreneurs, and everyday inhabitants in informing the modeling of harbor cities in the context of rapid and drastic physical and mental changes.

AHT 230T Art, Politics, Landscape in Ireland and Northern Ireland

This course focuses on the relation between the visual arts, politics and landscape in Ireland and Northern Ireland. It emphasizes the role played by culture and aesthetics in the shaping of territorial identities on the island. It also looks at the historical evolution of conflicting socio-political configurations, whose modeling of physical and imaginary landscapes will be scrutinized. Singular and interacting identities within the spatial political nexus of Ireland, Northern Ireland and the United Kingdom, are explored from the mediating perspective of aesthetic production and consumption. The course looks at early Celtic sculpture, craftsmanship and illuminated manuscripts, the circulation of artistic ideas and artists during the medieval and early modern period, before turning to nascent modernities in art and architecture. Artistic production during the Troubles in the second half of the Twentieth century is finally discussed in relation to the complex negotiation of past and present identities and heritage in Northern Ireland. The vibrancy of contemporary Irish and northern Irish art finally provides a platform from which to reflect on current aesthetic syncretisms. This course includes a travel component, with in situ visits to be organized in Dublin, Belfast and Derry.

AHT 231 Renaissance Art and Architecture in Italy

This course follows the evolution of early Renaissance architecture, sculpture and painting in Florence as exemplified in the works of Brunelleschi, Alberti, Donatello, and Masaccio, before taking up the principles of High Renaissance art and its major exponents: Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo and Raphael. The course is designed to define the objectives of individual artists and to discuss to what extent these objectives are indicative of Renaissance thought. Note: This course may carry an additional fee for weekend field trips.

AHT 233 Venice and the East

An in-depth survey of the Renaissance in Venice and Northern Italy, areas where, once the innovations in Central Italy took hold, produced artists who were extremely influential for later developments throughout Europe, especially Mantegna, Giorgione, Titian, Tintoretto, and Veronese.

AHT 234 Painting in France in the 19th Century: Reality, Impressions, Simultaneity

This course sets out to chart and discuss the development of painting in France from the emergence of Romanticism in the early 19th Century to the critical recognition of post-impressionist practices at the turn of the 20th Century. It looks at the changing relations to reality that were developed by the impressionist group, leading to the emergence of a new visual understanding of the world in cubists practices that resolutely abandoned the aesthetics space inherited from the Renaissance. The course considers both the continuous evolution of a classical tradition sustained by state institutions and its progressive superseding by an avant-garde relying on the growth of the private commercial sector. Throughout this course, the relationship between the visual arts and other forms of cultural expression will be highlighted.

AHT 256 Women in Art

The course will consider the topic from two distinct perspectives: the representation of women in art and successful woman painters, sculptors, and architects. Clarifying and explaining the original purposes of female representations, beginning with pre-historic fertility figures, the course will focus on some of the most important images of women created in the history of art. A division between a representation's physical and spiritual intent will be explored as well as its original social purpose and later misinterpretations in popular culture. Concepts of power, beauty, and idealism, of goodness and malevolence, of motherhood, saintliness and prostitution, of prophecy and witchcraft, of war and protection - all of which are closely associated with the power of the female image - will be part of the discussions. From the other side, the course will look at powerful women creators, from Artemisia Gentilleschi to Zaha Hadid, the challenges they face(d) and superb works they produce(d).

AHT 257T Introduction to the History of Architecture

This Academic Travel course investigates the history of the built environment as technical, social, and cultural expression from antiquity to the contemporary. It studies building techniques, styles, and expressions in terms of their chronology and context. Themes, theories, and ideas in architecture and urban design are also explored. Among other focus topics, students are encouraged to consider architecture as a cultural expression, study its semiotic potential, ascertain its role within political aesthetics, and investigate its relationship to best practices in sustainable building.

AHT 270 Theories and Methods in Art History and Visual Culture

The course introduces students to the theories and methods of art history and visual culture. It addresses both traditional and innovative models from art history and how to apply methodologies from other disciplines to the study of the visual world. Students will conduct original research projects using a variety of critical approaches to put their theoretical knowledge in practice.

AHT 280 Contemporary Art: From the New York School to the Present

This course focuses on the history of contemporary art from 1945 to the present, paying particular attention to developments in European and North American art within an increasingly global culture. Our topics include: reactions to modernism and its discourses, the dematerialization of art and the rise of conceptualism, activist art and institutional critique, site-specific and time-based art, postmodernist discourses and aesthetics as well as historical mindedness in contemporary art practices. The course will place a particular focus on the relation between the art object and the artist's intention/idea. The role of institutions within the art world will be analysed in relation to the development of process based practices. Particular emphasis will be put on the theoretical writings of artists and critics. Visits to Contemporary Art museums will be included.

AHT 285T Technology in Art, Visual Communication, and Fashion

From early optical instruments to Renaissance printing presses, from camera obscuras floating on boats to portable paint tubes, from modern film cameras to laser sculptures, from computer robotics to 3D printing, technology continues to play a major role in art, visual communication, and fashion. It shapes both creative processes and production techniques in the making of visual culture and it affects and defines the status of the beholder of its manifold expressions. The course will investigate some of the milestones in the history of instruments and will take up contemporary technology to investigate the intertwined connection between man and machine in the creative world.

AHT 320 Anthropologies of Art

The course is taught in collaboration with the Museo delle Culture Extraeuropee of Lugano (www.mcl.lugano.ch) and takes place in the classroom and in the galleries of the museum at Villa Heleneum. It is not so much about the history of art but about the relations between artifacts and people in history. Treating topics such as the power of and in images, art and religion, art and social life, and art and communication, we will discuss how the deep structure of the human mind creates, relates to, and is reflected in artifacts of the Western world. At Villa Heleneum we will have the chance to study masks and other cult objects and their relations to the peoples from Oceania, Africa, and Asia together with museum curators. Classes will take place in front of exhibits and are structured around specific topics, including the meaning and value of the ethnical work of art, and photography and film in anthropology.

AHT 330T Crossroads: Arts and Cultural Heritage of Taiwan

This course looks at the art historical and cultural heritage of Taiwan, exploring the islands complex identity shaped by both oriental and western territorial expansions. The civilization waves which contributed to the formation of Taiwaneses culture include the European Dutch and Spanish settlements of the early seventeenth centuries, long standing Chinese migrations, rebel Chinese and then imperial seals in the late Seventeenth century, as well as Japanese governance in the first part of the Twentieth century. Besides those external forces, Formosa was and has remained the habitat of ancient populations predating and indeed surviving the various colonization processes which have occurred from the seventeenth century onwards. The course places particular emphasis on artistic production in Taiwan as an agent of cultural identity formation, investigating in particular pictorial, sculptural, architectural and photographic traditions. Furthermore, following the migration of the Republic of China (ROC) to the island in 1949, Taiwan became the repository of a unique collection of Chinese ancient and buoyant art historical production. The cultural heritage of Taiwan will be approached through both is roots in traditional arts and civilizations, and contemporary practices, reflecting on the islands privileged position at the heart of a hybrid, vibrant identity.

AHT 338 The City and Its Representation in the 20th Century

This course looks at the representation of the modern and postmodern city in the 20th century through a range of mediums, including the visual arts, poetry, literature, cinema and architecture. It aims to consider how artistic production has reflected the changing nature of urban environments, as well as contributed to shaping contemporary perceptions and experiences of the city over the course of the century. It examines both the historical construction of socio-political and economic urban textures, and the manner though which these have found themselves incorporated and translated into aesthetic propositions. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

AHT 350 Museums and Art Galleries: Theory, History and Practice

This course looks at museum theory and practices at the beginning of the 21st Century, placing particular emphasis on art museums and galleries. Students will be encouraged to familiarize themselves with theoretical issues rooted in the historical development of national collections in the 19th century, as well as to consider a number of practical applications required of museum personnel in the present day. On the one hand, the course discusses a number of issues operative in the field of heritage and museum studies, such as authenticity, public(s) and reception, interpretation, historical discourse, memory, dark heritage. It will aim to present an archaeology of the museum realm informed and constructed by historical practice and discourses. Secondly, the course will aim to discuss a number of technical practical functions in the art museum and art gallery context, such as curating, conservation, law, marketing and design, public relations and research. Informed by theoretical and historical reflections, it will aim to explore the current technical operations active in the body-museum and the challenges that might lie ahead. A number of visits and workshops in museums in the Ticino region will be scheduled.

AHT 361 The Visual Culture of Disaster

The destruction of Pompeii after the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, the plague, the Sack of Rome, Hiroshima, and 9/11 are some examples with which The Visual Culture of Disaster will examine the impact of natural and man-made catastrophes on the visual world. How have painters, sculptors, photographers, architects, and filmmakers come to terms with these disasters? Did the devastation have a tabula rasa effect, meaning in what manner did it destroy an existing and produce a new visual culture? In addition to the historical perspective, the course will place a focus on the contemporary world. It will investigate how real-time media, such as television, has influenced the visual culture of disaster; and it will probe how art can contribute to the prevention of disaster by looking at the iconographies and aesthetics of sustainable energies - sun, wind, and water - and to what extent they have been incorporated in contemporary architecture, art, and film. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

AHT 362 Visual Semiotics: Signs and Symbols in Art, Architecture, Film, and Fashion

The course will investigate the different types of sign languages that we find in the visual arts. It will study and discuss theories of semiotics and then investigate how each medium sets up its own method of visual communication through signs and symbols. What kinds of patterns of messages do we find in paintings? Do buildings have their own code of communication other than being functional containers? What kinds of messages does a film convey beyond its action? Do the clothes we wear make a statement? In addition to the theoretical aspect, the course will also contain an empirical and a studio component where students will conduct research on a particular topic, which they will then present in a visual medium of their choice.

AHT 371 Topics in Art History

Topics in Art History vary from year to year. They are advanced courses on specific topics not normally offered, and they may require additional pre-requisites or permission of instructor.

AHT 375 Nature City Post-1960

The turn of the 1960s-70s, characterized by the rapid acceleration of time-space compression associated with 20th century global processes, prompted a radical transformation in the perception of urban and natural environments. The geographer Henry Lefebvre significantly heralded the advent of an urban revolution (1970), which has now spiraled into the prospect of a total urbanization of the planet. This paradigmatic shift has been accompanied by increased environmental awareness and activism, as well as a growing recognition of the complex interplay between natural and urban entities. This course looks at a range of aesthetic practices which have been engaging with ecology and ecosystems, energy, world conceptions and the formation of hybrid landscapes and environments since the 1960s. While the processes of urban and territorial transformations take place in the physical world, their design, assessment, alteration and pursuits occur at the level of representation. With a particular focus on aesthetics and architecture, the course explores the changing urban imaginaries of land, water and skies in the second half of the 20th century, and the rise of a planetary scale supplanting previous cosmological representations on earth.

AHT 497 Art History Senior Project

Senior or capstone project in Art History to be coordinated with the Department Chair.

AHT 498 Art History Internship

Internship experience working for a business or organization related to a student's Art History major to be coordinated with the student's Academic Advisor, and the Department Chair.

AHT 499 Art History Thesis

Thesis proposals to be coordinated with Department Chair and Academic Advisor.

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Biology

BIO 101 Introduction to Biology: Genetics, Evolution, and Ecology

An introduction to the biological sciences. Topics include the principles of genetics, evolutionary theory, ecology, and conservation biology. Course includes occasional afternoon laboratory sessions.

BIO 102 Introduction to Biology: Cell and Animal Biology

This course provides students with an introduction to the biological sciences focused on the structure and functioning of animal cells and organs. Topics include basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, cellular respiration, and animal physiology. This course will emphasize human anatomy and physiology as model systems for understanding and contrasting key principles of animal biology. The course includes both lecture and laboratory sessions. (Students can only earn credit for either SCI 100, SCI 106 or BIO 102.)

BIO 103 Introduction to Biology: Plant Science

The course introduces students to the fascinating world of plants and examines them from different biological levels: cell, organism, and communities. It also explores a variety of topics, including how they capture carbon from the atmosphere, how they have adapted to different environments across the globe, and how they reproduce. It also considers the important role they play in the world and human societies. Using the campus and the local area, students will study the plants nearby in various field activities that may take place outside of the regularly scheduled course period.

BIO 301 Conservation Biology

This course considers the principles of biological diversity and the application of science to its conservation. It covers conservation concepts at the genetic, species, population, community, and landscape level. The course examines the causes behind the current biodiversity crisis and then focuses on modern conservation and restoration efforts. It employs recent case studies around the globe to illustrate course concepts. May include laboratory sessions and field trips. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

BIO 310 Ecology

This course examines the interactions of organisms with their environment and each other, the dynamics of populations, the structure and functions of ecosystems, the role of biogeochemical cycles, and biodiversity. Required laboratory sessions. MAT 201 and BIO 102 are strongly recommended prior to taking this course. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

BIO 330 Epidemiology, Disease and Public Health

Epidemiology examines a wide range of disease conditions and their distribution in the human populations to promote public health. The course will at first analyze the methods employed in describing, monitoring, and studying health and diseases in populations. The core of the course will then focus on the discussion of factors and issues of illnesses most currently prevalent in the world including: HIV/AIDS, vaccine preventable diseases, avian influenza, emerging infections, DT, tuberculosis and malaria. Particular attention will be given to the immune system and on the body's reactions when exposed to foreign agents such as bacteria, viruses and toxins. Aspects addressed in lectures will also be the strategies for disease surveillance and for outbreak prevention, detection and control. Two case studies that may be considered are the Spanish Flu and the Avian Influenza. The class format will include lectures, discussions and critical review of assigned reading material.

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Business/Management

BUS 105T Introduction to Entrepreneurship and Risk Taking

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts about being an entrepreneur, especially in the high-tech area, and the related concept of risk taking in order to stay competitive in a fast-moving economy. Students will explore preeminent thinkers in the field of entrepreneurship and risk taking, as well as today's leading minds, entrepreneurial visionaries and landmark ideas that have established this innovative area of business. Students will look at the basis of entrepreneurship and at fundamental approaches to creating and building a startup business. Students will explore and discuss case studies, articles published in business-related periodicals and sections of published works on entrepreneurship. This course includes an Academic Travel component to private and public entities that sponsor entrepreneurial activity generally in Switzerland, France and Italy.

BUS 115 Financial Accounting

This course is designed to provide students with a basic knowledge of financial accounting concepts, procedures, analysis, and internal reports as an essential part of the decision-making process. The focus is on the three basic steps of the accounting process: recording, classifying, and summarizing financial transactions. Emphasis is placed on the general accounting activities leading up to the preparation of financial statements.

BUS 135 Introduction to Business Systems

The course introduces the global business system in the context of the economic, political, social and technological environments, relating business to society as a whole. Topics covered include the international scope, function, and organization of firms, and other fundamental concepts of multinational business. The course also addresses functional areas such as the value chain, production, marketing, human resources, and accounting.

BUS 136 Marketing in a Global Context

This course is an introduction to the tools and concepts used in the marketing process for consumer and industrial products as well as for services. The focus is on the basic marketing concepts (product, place, price, promotion) as they relate to the field of global marketing. Emphasis is placed on the increasingly important role of interdisciplinary tools to analyze economic, cultural and structural differences across international markets. Specific consideration is given to the development of integrated marketing programs for a complex, global environment.

BUS 199 First Year Seminar

Seminar topics change year to year. Please consult the Schedule of Classes for current seminar offerings.

BUS 240 Principles of Advertising

The emphasis of the course is placed on advertising's role in today's economic and social environment. The course takes a contemporary approach to the field, highlighting how recent and rapid evolutions in the social, business and technological environments are forcing advertising specialists to make major changes in the way they reach their markets. Students will learn about the growing importance of sociology, psychology and cultural anthropology in the way companies are marketing and advertising their products. Additionally, team projects will allow students to develop advertising campaigns and media plans.

BUS 285 Integrated Marketing Communications

This course exposes students to an integrated, global approach of two-way communication with consumers, customers and suppliers, and other stakeholders of companies and organizations. Students explore the communications process that is essential in contemporary global business cultures. Media options are explored for a range of target audiences. Discussions on the use of advertising, public relations, sales promotions, internet promotion, direct marketing and other techniques will be included. It takes a contemporary approach to the field of integrated marketing communications, highlighting how recent changes and rapid changes in the family, business environment, technology and the world in general are forcing communications specialists and advertisers to make major changes in the way they reach their markets. The course will draw on knowledge in fields such as psychology, sociology and anthropology, as well as media studies and communications. NOTE: Students who have completed BUS 240 may not also earn credit for BUS 285.

BUS 286 Product and Services Management

This course is designed to provide an understanding of how to manage both products and services over their life cycles. This course is designed to build on the conceptual tools covered in the introductory marketing course by applying them to management issues related to products and services. The course will be divided into two parts. The first half will focus on issues related to product management, moving from new product design and development to product line and product category decisions. The second half will focus on services marketing strategies to increase customer satisfaction, improve customer retention and create dominant service brands.

BUS 296 Faculty Fellows Summer Program

BUS 297 Faculty Fellows Summer Program

Faculty Fellows Program courses are offered in the Summer sessions. Specific course offerings vary from year to year.

BUS 306 Quantitative Methods and Dynamic Forecasting

This computer based course covers statistical estimation theory as applied to dynamic and volatile business systems. It addresses sampling distributions, population parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, statistical quality control, statistical model building, multiple regression analysis, Box-Jenkins autoregressive models, seasonal models and dynamic forecasting. Ultimately students are asked to write a research paper: "Dynamic Statistical Modeling in Business and Economics using Web based Resources".

BUS 315 Managerial Accounting

This course considers the nature, concepts, techniques, and ethics of the managerial accounting function, the preparation of reports, and the uses of accounting data for internal decision-making in manufacturing, retail, service, government, and non-profit organizations. Topics covered include a review of financial accounting, cost definitions and measurement, job-order and process costing, models of cost behavior, break-even and cost-volume-profit-analysis, activity-based costing and management systems, flexible budgeting methods, cost variance analysis, and a consideration of output & pricing decisions throughout the entire enterprise.

BUS 326 Managerial Finance

This course examines the principles and practices of fund management in organizations. Attention is given to managerial financial decisions in a global market setting concerning such questions as how to obtain an adequate supply of capital and credit, and how to evaluate alternative sources of funds and their costs. Topics include the management of assets and liabilities, working capital management, capital budgeting, equity versus debt financing, capital structure, and financial forecasting.

BUS 340 Management Science

This course is an introduction to quantitative decision making. Problems covered include production scheduling, transportation problems, project management, media selection, optimum decision strategies, portfolio construction and inventory management. Theoretical methods include linear programming, integer linear programming, sensitivity analysis and complex decision trees. Case problems based on the software "Management Scientist" stress real world applications. Students are asked to write a research paper based on the real data analysis.

BUS 353 Strategic Management Theory

Strategic management is the study of firms and the political, economic, social and technological environments that affect their organization and strategic decisions. This course considers the external market environment in which firms operate, and provides theoretical foundations, focusing on economic and strategic theories of the firm and introducing key concepts of organizational theory. Practically, the course looks at the creation of competitive advantage of a firm in the global arena. The readings and class discussions include both theoretical concepts and practical case studies. (Junior status recommended)

BUS 357 Global Information Systems

This course addresses the impact of modern information technology and data management concepts at the functional levels of international business, especially in the areas of finance, marketing, accounting and resource management. The computer-based section of the course provides methodology and software tools, advanced EXCEL modeling and DBMS -FoxPro, necessary to develop and evaluate Decision Support Systems, Management Information Systems, and Transaction Processing Systems. Case-based learning is utilized to stress how international firms can gain a competitive advantage by leveraging information technology. Students are asked to complete a six-week-long project related to system analysis and design. (Recommended CPT 105 and BUS 326)

BUS 370 Special Topics in Management

Special topics in Management vary with each course offering. Course description and pre-requisites are specified in the individualcourse description.

BUS 373 International Entrepreneurship

This course develops attitudes, concepts and skills that enable entrepreneurs and managers to pursue opportunities in spite of uncertainty. The course examines how entrepreneurs and business innovators acquire and manage resources for new ventures and change within organizations. The course also explores current problems and issues in entrepreneurial ventures and change management. Course activities include the preparation of a new venture business plan. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements). Recommended BUS 326.

BUS 374 Corporate Branding

This course examines how brands can be best managed to improve customer experience and brand equity. Topics covered include: issues such as intellectual property, brand benefits, purpose and brand narratives. The course begins with a concise review of strategic thinking on brand management, focusing on positioning, mission, identity, stakeholder engagement and extending the life of a brand. The course also explores how to develop memorable brand experiences and how to avoid brand commoditization.

BUS 379 Topics in International Management

Special Topics course that is designed to cover varying topics that change from semester to semester.

BUS 381 Sustainability and Innovation Management

The management of innovation is one of the most important and challenging aspects of contemporary business. Innovation is a fundamental driver of competitiveness for firms in a wide variety of sectors. Environmental sustainability is also a concern of managers in all organizations and is closely linked to the challenges of innovation. The objective of this course is to help managers deal with the issues surrounding both sustainability and innovation. The course has an international focus since innovation development and diffusion are essentially international activities that involve companies selling products and services abroad or working with foreign suppliers and partners. Students will be provided with a set of theoretical frameworks and concepts from both economics and management useful for understanding innovation processes. They will then explore some of the major challenges related to sustainability and innovation, such as the management of company and environmental resources, product development and new product diffusion, industry dynamics, green marketing and innovation systems. Case studies are used extensively in the course in order to help students apply the conceptual frameworks presented to real-world business challenges.

BUS 382 Global Sales Management

This course explores the organizational methods used in sales force management as well as effective sales techniques. Students will learn to create sales pitches and to make sales presentations. They will also explore the need to understand cultural differences, and will learn how to apply motivational techniques, evaluate performance, use databases, displays and pricing techniques, match clientele with sales people, close deals and follow up with clients. The issues of relationship marketing and negotiation skills will also be explored.

BUS 384 Global Marketing Strategies

This course investigates contemporary thinking on the subject of strategic marketing and its natural relationship with corporate culture and structure. Students will learn about the importance of ideas and their relevance to the building and maintenance of strong brands and companies. Case studies allow students to solve problems facing companies by performing SWOT analyses, creating marketing plans, and applying financial feasibility analyses. These tasks are applied to issues such as product development, branding, customer relationship building and global marketing. (Junior status recommended)

BUS 385 Consumer Behavior in International Marketing

This course focuses on the understanding of the consumer as fundamental to marketing efforts. The course includes observational research in the community where students develop a greater understanding of consumers' consumption and decision-making behavior. Areas of focus include the consumer decision making process, research techniques, learning and motivation, segmentation and targeting, the impact of lifestyle and values, the role of society and culture in consumption, and ethical issues in consumer relationships.

BUS 397 Business Intelligence

This course introduces the-cutting edge computing methods for the analysis of business and market big data which help in inferring and validating patterns, structures and relationships in data, as a tool to support decisions at all levels of management. Students learn key descriptive, predictive, and prescriptive data mining methods with both supervised and non-supervised learning algorithms, which produce information for non-structured and semi structured decision making. While the course introduces a systems approach to business data processing starting with DBMS systems, emphasis will be given to empirical applications using modern software tools such as XL-Miner and IBM SPSS modeler. More specifically, students will become familiar with and demonstrate proficiency in applications such as cluster analysis, logistic regression, classification to group customers into classes and a class-based pricing procedure, market segmentation and targeting, neural networks, decision trees and nonlinear optimization for asset allocation . Engagement based learning is provided by using real world cases as well as computer based hands-on real data analysis. Working in teams, students will demonstrate knowledge in applying data mining analytical techniques on a real world business problem to discover new information by preparing and presenting a self-designed semester project. In addition to specific prerequisites, BUS 326 is also recommended.

BUS 410 Organizational Behavior and Leadership

This course studies the internal environment of firms and organizations, namely how to organize and manage people in order to implement strategic plans effectively. Topics include: organizational structures and change, human resources, leadership, group dynamics and teamwork, motivation, and multicultural management. Special attention will be given to the study of leadership, which plays a critical role in increasingly complex and multicultural organizations. The readings and class discussions include both theoretical concepts, case studies and practical exercises.(This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirement.) (Junior status recommended)

BUS 414 International Legal Environments

This course is intended to expose business students to the critical relationship between business and law. The course acquaints students with fundamental concepts and principles of law that may concern them in their day-to-day business or organizational activities. Specifically, the objectives are to: familiarize the student with legal language and concepts, increase the student's understanding of the legal system and how it functions, develop the student's appreciation of the international legal environment in which organizations must operate, to expose the student to legal reasoning and develop his/her ability to apply legal concepts and to encourage the student to do critical thinking of the international legal implications present in business and other organizational activities.

BUS 415 Country Risk Assessment

The goal of the course is to have the student develop a better understanding of the types of risks that are relevant for country analysis, with special emphasis given to financial and investment risk. The course explores both the traditional quantitative and qualitative methodologies for evaluating country financial and business risk from the perspective of external investors of both financial capital and physical assets. It also provides comprehensive coverage of related topics including the analysis and reporting of sovereign creditworthiness, political risk, current account analysis, statistical credit-scoring methodologies, loan valuation models, analysis of currency instability, competition from state-owned enterprises, patent and trademark protection, and regulatory supervision. The course also discusses the interrelationship between ratings and economic development. Real world case studies will be used to substantiate theoretical analysis. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirement).

BUS 416 Innovation Management

The management of innovation is one of the most important and challenging aspects of contemporary business. Innovation is a fundamental driver of competitiveness for firms in a wide variety of sectors. Efficiency, productivity and sustainability are the concern of managers in all organizations. The objective of this course is to help managers deal with the issues surrounding innovation. The course has an international focus since innovation development and diffusion are essentially international activities that involve companies selling products and services abroad or working with foreign suppliers and partners. Students are provided with a set of tools to assess a firms innovative capabilities and identify how they may be leveraged or improved. Students also explore recent advances in the academic literature on innovation management, including topics related to competitive dynamics, strategic choice, product development, technology sourcing and organizational context. Case studies are used extensively in the course in order to help students apply the conceptual frameworks presented to real-world business challenges.

BUS 426 International Financial Management

This course deals with financial problems of multinational business. Topics include sources of funds for foreign operations, capital budgeting and foreign investment decisions, foreign exchange losses, and evaluation of securities of multinational and foreign corporations. Particular emphasis is placed on international capital and financial markets. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.) Recommended: BUS 306.

BUS 455 Global Strategic Management

This course, intended as a capstone to the International Management major, should come after students have studied all basic aspects of management. The course focuses on the development and implementation of multinational corporate strategies. Using the case study method and a computer-based simulation, students are required to apply the concepts of accounting, finance, marketing, management science and organizational behavior to the development of a strategic plan. Emphasis includes the integration of strategy, organizational structure and corporate culture.(As a capstone, this writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

BUS 470 Special Topics in Management

Special topics in Management vary with each course offering. Course description and pre-requisites are specified in the individualcourse description.

BUS 485 Global Research Strategies

This course focuses on new developments and trends in research methodology. The class also reviews standard topics, such as the use of surveys and statistical research, secondary data research, organization of research, sample size and basic statistics. Additionally, the course covers the creation of effective methods of research, including chi-square analysis, Factor Analysis, ANOVA and MANOVA. Students learn about experiments, observations, focus groups, telephone surveys, mail surveys and panel data. A large component of the class involves the creation of a good survey, including its organization, question development, use of scales, coding and tabulation and writing of a clear and concise research report. (Recommended: BUS 385)

BUS 498 International Management Internship

This course involves a company-based internship experience. The internship can be with an organization anywhere in the world, with in-company supervision approved by the instructor. On the basis of experience gathered during the internship, each student prepares a report to a professional standard, and presents this formally to an audience of students and professors; both report and presentation are evaluated.

BUS 499 International Management Thesis

The International Management Thesis is a written research project that is chosen in a student's primary field of study, such as Management, Finance, Marketing, Quantitative Methods or Management Information Systems, and is intended to demonstrate the ability to do mature work within the field of study.

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Career Development

CDV 290 Project Management Certification Preparation

Students will learn about various project management topics based on the International Project Management Association Competence Baseline. This intensive, one-credit course will require students to apply the knowledge gained to solve practical problems from both theory and case studies. The course will introduce the basic concepts of project management, including project marketing, risk management, and project leadership. Students will then be prepared and eligible to take the InnoPark Academy internationally recognized certification.

CDV 298 Career Development for Global Citizens: Integrating Your International Experience

How does one integrate an international educational experience with the career development process? How does one prepare for graduate and professional experience? This seminar aims to introduce and familiarize students with the career development process with an emphasis on identifying and communicating the skills, traits, and values gained through international, cross-cultural, and disciplinary learning experiences. This interdisciplinary course will require students to use critical thinking, writing, speaking, and research skills through individual assignments and exercises. (1 credit)

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Communication and Media Studies

COM 105 Introduction to Communication and Media Studies

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and theories of communication and media studies as they apply to the ever-increasing intercultural interactions of a contemporary world. In particular, students will learn the basics of intercultural/international communication processes, gaining a foundation for developing intercultural communication competence.

COM 180 Public Speaking

This course introduces students to the basic theory and practice of public speaking. More than simply a required skill for class and/or professional presentations, public speaking has a long political tradition in many cultures both ancient and modern. It complements civic engagement within the public sphere and plays a central role in deliberative political participation. Since the emergence of the Internet, public speaking has also become increasingly important in digital form. From a theoretical point of view, this course considers both the historical role of public speaking as it relates to socio-political change and its ongoing necessity today within global processes. From a practical point of view, students will become familiar with various rhetorical methods and concepts involved in public speaking, learn how to analyze and critically understand actual speeches, and practice public speaking in a variety of contexts. Students should leave the course with a better understanding of both the theory and practice of public speak-ing, particularly with a view towards global social engagement.

COM 199 First Year Seminar

Seminar topics change year to year. Please see current FYS offerings.

COM 201 Fundamentals of Media Studies and Criticism

Media pervades our social and private lives. We make it and in turn it makes us. This course offers an introduction to media studies, a field which seeks to understand and use media in complex and intentional ways. The course explores media as content, as an industry and as a social force. In this way, media is understood as both as an artifact (constituted by many parts) and as a set of complex processes (including production, distribution, regulation and consumption). In this course, students will learn key vocabularies and concepts in and approaches to media studies that will help them to define, describe, and critique media artifacts and processes in a variety of written and spoken formats. In addition to equipping students with the skills to understand and critique media, this course encourages and provides students with the building blocks to produce media content. Students who successfully complete this course will be prepared to take advanced courses in media studies.

COM 202 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication

This course introduces students to theories, concepts, and research in the study of interpersonal communication. From a scholarly perspective, students will gain a fundamental knowledge of how interpersonal communication processes work. In addition, students will develop skill in analyzing the interpersonal communication that surrounds them in their everyday life. (COM 105 recommended)

COM 203 Communication Research Methods

This course introduces students to quantitative and qualitative research methods as they apply to communication and media studies. Students will acquire skill in examining various communication and media issues by conducting an original research project.

COM 204 Media Ecology

COM 204T Media Ecology: Nordic Noir/Danish Hygge

This course explores media from the lens of ecology, using ecological concepts and thinking to both explore media as ecosystemic (comprised of communities, relationships, flows and feedback loops between biotic and abiotic components) and reflect upon media production and consumption in terms of sustainability (environmental, social and personal). The Academic Travel portion situates the study of media ecology in the specific context of Denmark where we examine two culturally pervasive (and internationally popular) media species: Nordic noir and hygge. Nordic noir is a genre of crime fiction (literary, tv and film) emanating out of Scandinavia that employs linguistic simplicity in the service of moral complexity; engaging in plots that reveal the tensions between the stable surfaces and shadowy interiors of Scandinavian societies (e.g. Miss Smillas Feeling for Snow, The Killing). Hygge, very roughly translated as coziness, is a Danish concept that has gained recent popularity in many parts of the world as cultural mentality, practice and aesthetic that may help explain Denmarks status as one of the worlds happiest countries. The travel component explores these two themes in the geographical and cultural contexts of Copenhagen and the west coast of Jutland. The first part of the travel takes place in the capital city, Copenhagen, where we delve into Nordic noir, exploring its relationship with Danish and Scandinavian media industries, culture, history, politics, and climate as well as its adaptations in other international markets and contexts. The second part of the travel is situated on the west coast of Jutland where we critically examine the Danish notion of hygge as both a cultural phenomenon and national export that is intimately connected to environmental, social and personal sustainability in a cold, dark and remote environment.

COM 220T Symbolizing Scottish Folk

Concurrent with processes of globalization, there has been a fervent, if not reactionary, revival of folk culture. Although the reinvention of folk cultures is a global phenomenon, it is particularly salient in places like Scotlanda complex nation that is as much British, modern, and Western as it is local, artisanal and traditional. Longstanding clashes over regional independence, enduring ties to local geographies and customs, and a thriving tourism industry in Scotland, have sustained rich folk cultures that serve both as powerful sources of identification as well as seductive expressions of national identity and culture. Using discursive and rhetorical approaches, this course explores the various ways in which folk identities, practices, cultures, and artifacts are represented and mobilized in the Scottish context by various communities and stakeholders.

COM 225T Technologized Bodies: Mobile ICTs in the City

Mobile information and communication technologies (ICTs) have become an essential part of our everyday social interactions. It was more than a decade ago that researchers started to look into the way the mobile phone penetrates both public and private domains including the body. As mobile ICTs continue to evolve, their impact on our everyday communication requires constant examination. This course takes a city as a site to explore the way human bodies are technologized with mobile ICTs. It will discuss how people see and document their everyday life of the city with mobile ICTs as well as how they are seen with mobile ICTs in the city (e.g., enhanced capacity of the natural human body such as eyes and brain). In light of the recent development of wearable technologies and sociable robotics, the course will also explore the role that such emerging technologies play now and in the near future. Both seminal and recent work on mobile ICTs, fashion, social robotics, and emotions will provide the theoretical base for the course. Field observations during the academic travel period will be a primary methodological approach to explore relevant issues of the technologized body in the city

COM 230T Communication, Fashion, and the Formation of Taste

The sense of taste, whether it refers to the metaphorical sense of taste (aesthetic discrimination) or the literal sense of taste (gustatory taste), is a fundamental part of human experiences. This Academic Travel course examines various ways that communication processes shape our sense of taste in the contemporary society. It will explore topics such as the taste for food, clothing and accessories, music, and other cultural activities applying key theories and concepts of communication, fashion, and taste. Ultimately, the course seeks to develop an understanding of how interpersonal, intercultural, and mediated communication in our everyday life plays a critical role in the formation of individual taste as well as collective taste. In order to achieve this objective, field observations and site visits will be planned during the academic travel period.

COM 295 Media Consumption, Fashion, and Identity

This course examines how people, particularly young people, consume media technologies and their contents in contemporary media-saturated life. Employing essential readings on media consumption, fashion, and identity as the theoretical backbone, students will engage in active site-based research project throughout the course. By offering an opportunity to undertake a field study in Milan, the course seeks to develop in-depth theoretical knowledge of the intersections of media consumption, fashion, and identity, as well as to cultivate critical reflection of students own consumption of media technologies. (Additional fee: 250 chf for transportation and related activities in Milan)

COM 300 History of Mediated Communication

Is textual literacy fundamental to political involvement? Have cell phones changed the nature of private and public space? Has the Internet democratized the production of culture? These are the kinds of questions we will explore in this cultural and historical survey of mediated communication. Traveling through the ages, we will explore both how media technologies are culturally situated and influenced as well as their significant and lasting implications on cultures, societies, and individuals.

COM 301 Globalization and Media

This course examines media in the context of globalization. Most broadly, students will explore what constitutes globalization, how globalization has been facilitated and articulated by media, how media have been shaped by the processes of globalization, and perhaps most significantly, the social implications of these complex and varied processes on politics, international relations, advocacy and cultural flows. In order to map this terrain, students will survey the major theories that constitute this dynamic area of study.

COM 302 Intercultural Communication: Theory, Research, and Practice

This course examines intercultural communication theories and research in order to gain a deeper understanding of critical issues we encounter in intercultural interactions. It seeks not only to develop a sophisticated level of intercultural communication competence but also to cultivate the skills of putting the knowledge into practice (e.g., conducting intercultural communication workshops, publishing articles that raise cultural awareness of a target audience, and so on).

COM 310 Issues in Journalism

This course uses key topics, themes and trends in journalism to explore the foundations and functions of the press, learn techniques of gathering and writing news, discuss the shifting terrain of journalism, and reflect upon the status and functions of journalism in different cultural contexts. As a writing-intensive course, this course is designed to help students produce high quality written work through a process of drafting, workshopping and editing. Written work may include journalistic reviews, letters to the editor, pitches to the editor and interviews. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

COM 320 The Art of Persuasion: Social Influence in Theory and Practice

Persuasion is a critical part of our everyday lives. Whether in the context of our interpersonal relationships, interaction with media, involvement in politics or professional duties, our success and happiness is often dependent upon the ability to both produce and understand persuasive messages across varied contexts. In spite of the overwhelming faith in communication to solve social, professional, and personal problems, communication and persuasion are often given abstract and incomplete treatment. This course provides a detailed exploration of theories of persuasion with an eye toward practice. In this vein, this course will illuminate theories of persuasion by having students apply them to issues, problems, and tasks they find both personally and professionally interesting. This is an ideal course for students seeking practical experience crafting persuasive messages and ideas for careers in public relations, advertising, journalism, politics, business, and social activism, to name just a few. This course is based in the belief that persuasion doesn't just "get you what you want," if done well, it also improves business, community, and lives by aligning interests in mutually productive ways.

COM 326 Digital Communication: Theory and Strategy

Digital communication is fundamental in today's businesses and, indeed, all organizational contexts. This course explores key dimensions of digital communication, namely what makes digital communication a unique form of communication and how communication practitioners and business professionals can more effectively use this medium. In addition to exploring important theories as they concern digital communication, design, and business strategies, students in this class will learn how to: - Plan and develop effective strategies for digital communication - Manage all aspects related to online projects (business models, management, costs, resources, etc.) - Take advantage of the Social Media revolution - Design the user experience (interaction design). In addition to learning basic theories and practices, students will make practical use of knowledge by working in teams in which they will both conceptualize and implement effective and professional projects.

COM 327 Producing Digital Media: Communication and Media in Practice

This course explores the impacts and capacities of new media technologies in producing social worlds and advocating social issues. Following an exploration of the key concepts in new media theory, students in this course will spend the bulk of the semester producing a digital short story about an issue of social interest. As a course in applied media and communication, students will have a hand in the entire process of producing, marketing, and showing the film.

COM 340 Argumentation and Media Ethics

This course explores the complex contours of media ethics from an argumentation perspective. In the course, students will learn what constitutes argumentation, the structural components of arguments, and the cultural dynamics of argument spheres, fields, and strategies. With this skill set, students will investigate and articulate positions on various issues in media ethics, especially as they are complicated by our increasingly global and digital media scape.

COM 347 Organizational Communication

This course examines the dynamic process of organizational communication. Situating communication as an essential part of "organizing" in our everyday life, it seeks to understand how we can participate in the creation and recreation of effective organizations. Students will learn key issues of organizational communication research such as communication channels, networks, organizational climate, interpersonal relationships within organizations, and organizational cultures. They will also learn how to apply the theoretical/conceptual knowledge to their present and future organizational life through case studies and communication audits.

COM 350 Mediated Relationships

This course examines the impact of emerging communication technologies on human communication. By critically examining current theories and research in the field, students will analyze present and future of technologically-mediated relationships as these pervade their everyday life.

COM 352 Environmental Discourses

This course examines the distinct modes of representation that have come to color how we think and act upon the natural world. Given the increasing importance of the environment in local, national, and global politics, this course is invested in helping students understand the significance of language in creating, defining, mitigating, and negotiating environmental issues and controversies. During the course of the semester, students will investigate (1) the socio-cultural history of environmental discourse, (2) the dominant discursive constructions of the environment, (3) the implications of these on, and the status of, contemporary environmental politics and advocacy, and (4) the importance of studying environmental discourse from a cross-cultural perspective. In order to explore the ideologies and attitudes at the heart of varying environmental discourses, students will analyze texts from various disciplines and spheres (e.g. political, scientific, activist, and popular), genres (e.g. films, books, newspaper articles, image events, policy briefs, and speeches) and rhetorical strategies (e.g. metaphors, tropes, and ideographs).

COM 365 Media Regulation and Policy

New media and the processes of globalization have profoundly altered the landscape of media regulation and policy. In an effort to better understand this new terrain, this course explores the major media systems, policy issues, legal frameworks and political institutions that govern global media policy with special attention to the growing impact of NGOs and IGOs. In addition to learning about these processes, students will leave this course with the ability to interpret and produce media policy.

COM 370 Topics in Communication and Media Studies

Topics in Communication and Media Studies vary from year to year. These are advanced courses for students who have had experience in at least one other upper-division COM course. (Course number and titles vary according to the topic, and may require different prerequisites.)

COM 497 Senior Research Seminar in Communication and Media Studies

This seminar provides students with a capstone experience in synthesizing their theoretical and methodological knowledge in the form of a high-quality research paper. Some of the major areas of research and theories in the field of communication and media studies will be reviewed and discussed in class as students work on their own research project. At the end of the semester, students will present their final research paper to an audience of students and professors. Students will also be encouraged to submit their paper to an appropriate conference venue around the world. (Prerequisite: Senior status)

COM 498 Internship in Communication and Media Studies

This course provides students with a capstone experience in applying to professional contexts key approaches and theories of communication and media studies. The internship site can be private, public or non-profit organizations anywhere in the world. Throughout the internship period, students should ensure close in-company supervision. At the end of the internship, students will prepare a detailed report analyzing their experience and present it formally to an audience of students and professors. Both written report and presentation will be critically assessed.

COM 499 Senior Thesis in Communication and Media Studies

Communication and Media Studies thesis proposal to be coordinated with the Department Chairs.

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Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies

LC 100T The Stories We Live By: Travel Writing and Switzerland

We live our lives surrounded by stories. They are literally everywhere and we use them, consciously or unconsciously, to make sense of our identities and our actions, our experiences and our lives. At the same time as we use stories to understand our worlds, we are shaped by the many stories that we are constantly absorbing and interpreting: we are our stories and our stories are us. This course is an introduction to this ongoing cycle of shaping stories and being shaped by stories, in particular stories about travel and by travel writers. As such, this course will serve as a foundation for your Franklin experience. Key concepts include narrative voice, intended audience, frame narratives, unreliable narrators, and stream-of-consciousness. Students will study examples of travel literature from the Odyssey to the salons of Mme de Stael, from Jean-Jacques Rousseau to twentieth-century travel writers Nicolas Bouvier and Ella Maillart. Course will include visits to the Val d'Anniviers in the Valais, Lausanne, Coppet, and Geneva as well as an excursion the Rousseaus Ile de St-Pierre and writing workshops that feature meetings with contemporary Swiss writers. Students who have a background in French are encouraged to do course readings and written work in the original language.

LC 100 The Stories We Live By

Stories are everywhere. We use them, consciously or unconsciously, to make sense of identities, experiences, and desires. And, at the same time, we are shaped by the stories that we absorb and interpret. This course explores how storytelling both reflects and shapes our lives. It introduces students to keywords and terms for reading and reflecting upon stories, both in the pages of books and in everyday life. The course considers a variety of narrative forms, including short stories, novels, fairy tales, self-help manuals, comics, films, podcasts, and political discourse. The course introduces students to fundamental questions about the nature of storytelling, while developing the vocabulary and critical skills for analysing and discussing stories. This is a writing intensive course in which students read as they learn to write. Students practice applying a critical vocabulary to textual forms as well as becoming familiar with the skills of drafting and editing. The course also introduces students to some of the professional pathways open to writers and storytellers. .(This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

LC 110 Reading Cultures: Approaches to Cultural Studies

This course has two primary goals: to introduce students to the history and theoretical writings of various strands of cultural studies, and to acquaint them with some of the intersecting axes - race, class and gender - that energize the field. Close attention will be paid to issues such as the shaping of identity, forms of representation, the production, consumption and distribution of cultural goods, and the construction of knowledge and power in a host of cultural practices and cultural institutions.

LC 200T Switzerland Unplugged: A Cultural History

This travel course must be taken in conjunction with LC 210T. Switzerland Unplugged is a somewhat different take on Franklins Academic Travel: it is a six-credit summer program that consists of two consecutive classes each divided into three modules that each deal with distinct aspects of Swiss culture, ranging from the birth and continued fame of such product as chocolate, cheese and watches, to the political and cultural conceptualisation of neutrality and direct democracy and the tense relationship between the august Swiss humanitarian tradition and the controversial refugee policies of late and finally to the edgy art, music and literature scenes found in the larger cities north of the San Gottardo. Campus will be the city of Zurich with all of its exciting possibilities, and the travel portion consists of four three-day trips to different sites in Switzerland, ranging from the Bundeshaus in Bern to a trip down the river Aare, from a open-air concert in Geneva to a remote hut in the Swiss alps, and from the Beyeler museum in Basel to a refugee camp in Chiasso. The aim of our studies and travels will be to look at Swiss culture up close and to uncover and understand some of the contradictions that make it work.

LC 210 Switzerland Unplugged: A Cultural History, Part II

This travel course must be taken in conjunction with LC 200T. Switzerland Unplugged is a somewhat different take on Franklins Academic Travel: it is a six-credit summer program that consists of two consecutive classes each divided into three modules that each deal with distinct aspects of Swiss culture, ranging from the birth and continued fame of such product as chocolate, cheese and watches, to the political and cultural conceptualisation of neutrality and direct democracy and the tense relationship between the august Swiss humanitarian tradition and the controversial refugee policies of late and finally to the edgy art, music and literature scenes found in the larger cities north of the San Gottardo. Campus will be the city of Zurich with all of its exciting possibilities, and the travel portion consists of four three-day trips to different sites in Switzerland, ranging from the Bundeshaus in Bern to a trip down the river Aare, from a open-air concert in Geneva to a remote hut in the Swiss alps, and from the Beyeler museum in Basel to a refugee camp in Chiasso. The aim of our studies and travels will be to look at Swiss culture up close and to uncover and understand some of the contradictions that make it work.

LC 210T Switzerland Unplugged: A Cultural History, Part II

This travel course must be taken in conjunction with LC 200T. Switzerland Unplugged is a somewhat different take on Franklins Academic Travel: it is a six-credit summer program that consists of two consecutive classes each divided into three modules that each deal with distinct aspects of Swiss culture, ranging from the birth and continued fame of such product as chocolate, cheese and watches, to the political and cultural conceptualisation of neutrality and direct democracy and the tense relationship between the august Swiss humanitarian tradition and the controversial refugee policies of late and finally to the edgy art, music and literature scenes found in the larger cities north of the San Gottardo. Campus will be the city of Zurich with all of its exciting possibilities, and the travel portion consists of four three-day trips to different sites in Switzerland, ranging from the Bundeshaus in Bern to a trip down the river Aare, from a open-air concert in Geneva to a remote hut in the Swiss alps, and from the Beyeler museum in Basel to a refugee camp in Chiasso. The aim of our studies and travels will be to look at Swiss culture up close and to uncover and understand some of the contradictions that make it work.

LC 497 Capstone: Comprehensive Readings in CLCS and Literature

LC 497 is the first of two capstone courses for majors in CLCS and in LIT. LC 497 is designed for all students and will follow the trajectory of a traditional reading course. Students and the professor will choose an extensive reading list that includes fundamental, primary and theoretical texts in literature and CLCS taken largely from the courses taught in the disciplines. Students will then choose their own texts to add to the core list that represent the individual student's particular area of interest. Class sessions will be devoted to the development of the list and subsequent discussion of the chosen works. Evaluation pieces include a comprehensive exam and a proposal for the subsequent thesis (LC 499) or internship project (LC 498).

LC 498 Capstone: Internship in CLCS or Literature

LC 498 is one of two available alternatives (the other being a thesis) for the second of two capstone courses for majors in CLCS and in LIT. LC 498 represents the culmination of the interdisciplinary, intercultural experience at Franklin. Students will complete an internship that represents the capstone to their major experience. An internship is recommended for students entering a professional field.

LC 499 Capstone: Thesis in CLCS or Literature

LC 499 is one of two available alternatives (the other being an internship) for the second of two capstone courses for majors in CLCS and in LIT. LC 499 represents the culmination of the interdisciplinary, intercultural experience at Franklin. Students will complete a thesis that represents the capstone to their major experience. A thesis is recommended in particular for students interested in pursuing graduate school.

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CLCS 199 First Year Seminar

Seminar topics change year to year. Please consult the Schedule of Classes for current seminar offerings.

CLCS 200 Gender and Sexuality in a Global Context

This course presents an interdisciplinary introduction to key concepts in gender studies. Focusing on the way in which gender operates in different cultural domains, this class investigates the manner in which race, culture, ethnicity, and class intersect with gender. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements).

CLCS 215T Vienna 1900: A Modernist City

This travel course focuses on the cosmopolitan city of Vienna around 1900 and the extraordinary set of historical and cultural circumstances that made this city one of the most interesting sites of modernism at the time. In broad terms, the course examines the correlation between culture and socio-political change and looks specifically at the complex cross-overs between history, psychoanalysis, and art and literature, with other forays into architecture, design, music and economics. As an introduction to the Franklin experience, value will be placed not only on the interdisciplinary connections between these fields, but also how we as travelers can understand the historical culture of a city. After contextualizing Vienna and the Hapsburg Empire at the turn of the century, students will explore works by artists and intellectuals such as Sigmund Freud, Gustav Klimt, Robert Musil, Gustav Mahler, Adolf Loos, and Theodor Herzl. This course includes a ten-day trip to Vienna with guided visits and lectures, during which time students will be able to focus in depth on a research topic of their choice. Students who have a background in German are encouraged to do course readings and written work in the original language.

CLCS 220 Inventing the Past: The Uses of Memory in a Changing World

The construction of memory is one of the fundamental processes by which the workings of culture can be studied. Every country, every culture and every community has a specific memory culture that finds expression in a congruence of texts: of literature and film, of law and politics, of memorial rituals, and historiography. The aim of this course is to enable students to recognize different forms of the construction, representation and archiving of memory; to analyze processes of individual and collective identity formation through memory; and to understand the power differentials operant in the negotiations and performance of a national memory.

CLCS 220T Inventing the Past: The Uses of Memory in a Changing World

The construction of memory is one of the fundamental processes by which the workings of culture can be studied. Every country, every culture and every community has a specific memory culture that finds expression in a congruence of texts: of literature and film, of law and politics, of memorial rituals, and historiography. The aim of this course is to enable students to recognize different forms of the construction, representation and archiving of memory; to analyze processes of individual and collective identity formation through memory; and to understand the power differentials operant in the negotiations and performance of a national memory. The travel component of this course will focus in particular on Berlin and representations of the Holocaust.

CLCS 225 Music and Popular Culture

This course covers popular music genres, generally defined as music produced for commercial purposes and transmitted through mass media to a wide audience, and their relationship with popular culture. Drawing on sociology, media studies and cultural studies, it will examine the cultural significance of popular music genres such as rocknroll, punk, heavy metal, hip hop, rap, techno, industrial etc., with reference to issues such as space, ethnicity, class and gender. It will further explore how and to what end the creation, circulation and consumption of popular music tend to be shaped by record companies and corporate business styles. Finally, reflecting upon how popular music is, in many ways, a direct reflection of its times, it will show how it is mediated by historical, geographical, political, economical and technological factors.

CLCS 230 Science / Fiction: Envisioning the Possible

Science fiction narratives may be defined as speculative fictions, ideal allegorical vehicles eliciting theoretical reflection on the state of contemporary culture and society and motivating social reform. As such, the main objective of this course is to consider several major contemporary socio-cultural issues through the unique lens provided by writers and filmmakers of the science-fiction tradition. The issues, allowing for variances from year to year, will include questions regarding gender and Otherness, the hypothesized deterioration of a human-world bond, modern apocalyptic anxieties, genetic engineering, intersections of ideology and communication technologies. Authors and filmmakers may include: Mary Shelley, Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, Isaac Asimov, Philip K. Dick, Ursula Le Guinn, Aldous Huxley, George Orwell, William Gibson; Ridley Scott, Stanley Kubrick, Andrew Niccol, Jean-Luc Godard, Lana and Andy Wachowski

CLCS 235T Greek Civilizations and Their Discontents

This travel course will focus on the co-existence and forced movement of populations between present-day Turkey and Greece while grappling with notions of human rights as inscribed in the ancient ideas of citizenship and polis. The travel will trace a parallel trajectory in the ancient and modern worlds: moving from Athens to Thessaloniki, students will study the histories of cultural co-existence and the moments of violent dissolution in the modern world; the class will also visit ancient sites such as Corinth and Mycenae on the Peloponnese; Delphi; the ancient city of Vergina, whose modern instantiation became the home of Greeks who were expelled from Turkey during the population exchange in 1922; and Philippi, abandoned to the Ottoman empire in the 14th century. Throughout this course, students will study notions of human rights, forced migration, and the tensions inherent in encounters between East and West. Students will read a broad array of texts, ranging from historical accounts to human rights treatises and philosophical texts, novels and plays.

CLCS 238T Reading the Postcolonial City: Berlin and Hamburg

Colonialism has left its traces not only very obviously on the former colonies themselves but also on the face of the cities of the colonisers. Host of the Congo Conference that carved up the continent in 1885, Germany was late into the scramble for Africa. However, it has long been implicated in colonialism through trade, scientific exploration, and Hamburgs position as a hinterland of the Atlantic Slave Trade. Seeking to explore colonial echoes in less obvious places, namely in contemporary Berlin and Hamburg, the course asks how we can remember colonialism in the modern world, become conscious of its traces, and encourage critical thinking about the connections between colonialism, migration and globalization. As an Academic Travel, this course will include an on-site component where the class will team up with postcolonial focus groups in Berlin and Hamburg, going onto the street and into the museum to retrace the cities colonial connections, and to experience and engage with the colonial past through performance-based activities.

CLCS 241 Forbidden Acts: Queer Studies and Performance

In this course, queer solo performance and theater are playfully considered "forbidden acts" because they commonly enact a special kind of transgression. These acts give voice to and, at once, subvert a wide range of political identities conventionally defined by race, ethnicity, HIV status, class, gender, and sexual practice. Often autobiographical at their point of departure, queer performance and theater seem intent on troubling the comfort of community even as they invest in it. This rich, albeit problematic, ambivalence stems from the fact that the term queer, itself, connotes primarily a locus of refusal, an unbinding and destabilizing term of defiance, of provocation via polysemy. As such, queer performance and theater seek to open up new vistas of multiple, shifting, polymorphous identities. What political implications might these queer texts dramatize? What may be the ramifications of instilling the notion of personal identity with collective utopian aspirations? How would the students enrolled in this class spin the term queer to encompass their own sense of individual difference and empower their own vision of creative defiance? In attempting to respond to these questions, students taking this course will be invited to share their own forbidden acts: to approach theoretical refection through performative exercises, to merge the analytical realm with the autobiographical monologue, to test the limits (if there are any) between theatrical play and ideological engagement. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements).

CLCS 242 Representations of Poverty in Literature, Film and the Media

This course looks at poverty as it is portrayed in contemporary literature, film, television, painting, music and street magazines. Students will explore how these representations compare to economic and social indices such as income, Living Standards Measurement surveys, welfare statistics, poverty indexes and poverty determinants. For these latter determinants the class will take Switzerland, a country in which the extremes of poverty and riches are quite subtle, as our case study. The overall goals of this course are 1) to compare different forms of representation and to recognize and be able to distinguish among the many faces and facets of poverty in a wealthy nation and 2) to critically explore the ideologies underlying mainstream representations of "the poor" or "the marginalized" and to ask how effective such representations are in triggering social change.

CLCS 243 The Cultural Politics of Sports

This course looks at sports as a cultural, social and political phenomenon and explores some of the major concepts pertinent to the cultural studies discipline through the lens of sports such as nationalism, social class, race/ethnicity, gender, celebrity culture and its fans, ethics, and concepts of power. Students will also consider the very ideas of 'sportsmanship,' 'playing the game' and the global 'mega-events' that many professional sports competitions have become. This course will involve reading theoretical essays related to sports, class discussion of the readings, regular reading responses, and presentations. Students will be encouraged to pursue their own research interests based on a particular sport, major sports event (Olympics, European Soccer Championship, World Series) or sports infrastructure (Little-League, college sports, sports clubs) and to reflect culturally on an activity that cuts across many disciplines (e.g. business, communications, ethics, health) as well as one that they themselves may be passionately involved in, either as actors and/or as spectators.

CLCS 245 Critical Approaches to the Graphic Novel: Justice in the Gutter

This interdisciplinary course will explore the theme of justice through the medium of the graphic novel. Although the battle between 'good' and 'evil' has been a mainstay of comic books for many generations, the emergence of the graphic novel as a recognized and serious artistic and literary medium has also problematized the theme of justice and its many variants, whether environmental, social, sexual, gendered, or racial. This course takes a serious look at how the graphic novel tells stories about justice. It explores the rhetorical, visual and semiotic strategies authors are using to tell those stories, considers critical approaches to the graphic novel as a medium, and studies the reception of graphic novels about justice in comparison with other media.

CLCS 247T French Orientalisms Renegotiated

Nineteenth- and early twentieth-century French authors and artists were instrumental in shaping the imaginary of the 'Orient' through hegemonic cultural production, with a myriad of paintings and texts housed for public consumption in national cultural institutions. Students will use the French 'case' to explore the centrality of the politics of representation to Orientalism: the creation and objectification of an Oriental 'Other' to be known and dominated. On-the-ground field study in museums and galleries of Paris (the former colonial capital) and Marseille (the 'Gateway to North Africa') will help students to investigate the ties that bind the visual arts and literature with the exercising of knowledge and power, and to read literary and artistic works as shaped by their cultural and historical circumstances. The strong Arab and Berber presence in both cities today, in particular from France's former colonies in North Africa, will provide the impetus to question how contemporary writers and artists explicitly and implicitly engage with and renegotiate these 'cultural artifacts', and what broader significance this might have for questions of representation and identity, Self and Other, in the (not only French) present. Students will read contemporary texts by authors such as Lela Sebbar and Assia Djbar and explore work by visual artists including Zineb Sedira, Zoulikha Bouabdellah and Frdrique Devaux, using their, and our own, 'encounters' in the Louvre, the Pompidou Center, the Arab World Institute, MuCEM and 'smaller' galleries to consider the significance of reappropriating the gaze and of the relationship between visual pleasure and politics, while questioning who art is 'for' and where the 'representation business' takes us. The course may count toward the French studies major in consultation with the professor of this course and coordinator of the French studies program.

CLCS 248T European Food Systems: You Are Where You Eat

In this course, students will explore the cultures that produce and are reproduced by our current food systems in Europe, touching upon the local, national and global dimensions. This course will examine the cultural, ecological, political, and geographic forces at work influencing the chain of production from farm to table. In particular, students will consider the contemporary food systems in France, Italy, and Switzerland as well as their cultural and historical roots. Students will learn more about what it takes to become an active food citizen as the class considers where food comes from here in Europe and how the food we eat shapes who we are, both literally and figuratively. This course includes a travel component to Switzerland and France where students will study first hand some of the concepts discussed, including terroir, slow food, and local farm to table movements. Recommended prerequisite: LC 100 or LC 110

CLCS 250 Ecocritical Approaches to Film

This course approaches film from an ecocritical perspective to explore how the medium of film articulates relations between the environment and humans. In recent decades, scholars have increasingly examined how film represents ecological issues and humans' involvement with those issues, particularly with regards to environmental disaster and climate change. The course aims to make students familiar with those debates by examining a variety of film genres -- blockbuster, documentary, animation, among others -- to offer a survey in reading film ecocritically. Students will gain experience in analyzing films as texts and in applying ecocritical theory to those films and the ethical issues surrounding them, from production to narrative, distribution to reception. Screenings, theoretical readings, class discussion, video-making and writing assignments will help students develop a critical awareness of how film tells the story of our complex relation with the environment. This course complements ENV 220 Ecocritical Approaches to Literature. (Recommended prerequisite: LC 110 or ENV 220)

CLCS 251T Reading Moroccan Culture

This course examines gender, ethnic, class, family, age, religious relationships within contemporary Morocco. It first provides students with a historical overview of Morocco since its independence in 1956, focusing on the monarchies of Hassan II and Mohammed VI the current king. It explores the power dynamics that exist in a a society that is predominantly patrilinear and where gender roles are mostly divided along a binary system; it studies the place of the individual in a society where the collective ego prevails; it considers the place of Berber identity within Moroccan society and finally it explores Sufism as a counter-power to any form of Islamic rigorism. All the themes studied are substantiated with presentations by Moroccan scholars working in the fields of sociology, gender, ethnic, religious, and music studies.

CLCS 260T Berlin: Migration and Transformation of the Urban Landscape

Over the last 20 years migration has dramatically changed Berlin's urban landscape, even as migrant groups have been changed by the peculiarities of Berlin's "Kieze," or neighborhoods. This course will focus on three districts in particular--Kreuzberg, Mitte and Friedrichshein--which have since the fall of the wall incorporated hundreds of thousands of migrants and refugees whose languages, cultures, ethnicities and religions have differed from those of more well-established German residents. In conversations with a variety of groups--residents and non-residents alike--the class will investigate how migrants and refugees from Turkey and, more recently Syria, Afghanistan and Iraq, have changed the city and how the city, in turn has changed them. The approach will be interdisciplinary, tracing the nexus of urban fabric and migration in storytelling, film, oral history, architecture, politics, graffitti and day-to-day streetlife, focussing in particular on the evolution of concepts that range from the more traditional ideas of integration and assimilation to the more recent notions of hospitality. (For students taking the class for GER credit, GER 301 is required.)

CLCS 271 Holocaust Memory in Berlin: Traces of the Third Reich in Cultural Narratives, Architecture, Memorial

We live in an epoch obsessed with memory: its specter haunts an array of activities - intellectual, creative, and political; its processes shadow our individual and collective lives. And yet, despite this ubiquity, the idea of memory remains elusive and forever mutable, for, depending on the context in which it is invoked and the purpose for which it is intended, it may take on a range of forms. The context in which students will study the workings of memory is Berlin, a place which has become emblematic of various aspects of the Holocaust. The questions guiding the inquiry into the often conflicted postwar politics of memory in Germany are the following: how does a nation deploy memory to create a positive identity? How do public representations work to elide, confirm, or undermine a constantly shifting historical discourse? And to what extent, finally, are minorities or "the other" included in, or excluded from, the business of inventing national identity? Students will read, visit, and analyze a wide variety of cultural texts, such as literary accounts, memorials, historical sites, exhibits, architectural structures, and films, in an attempt to chart the often tortuous process by which a nation comes to terms with its past, and projects itself into the future. Using some of the rich scholarly literature on memory that has been produced in the wake of the Holocaust, the class will examine a variety of sites in order to compare how our core questions are inflected by various political circumstances and cultural pressures. This course has no prerequisites if taken as a CLCS course. There is also an option to take it for German cultural credit without prerequisites or as German language credit. To take it as a German language credit, students must have completed GER 300 with a C, or have obtained the instructors permission.

CLCS 295 Faculty Fellows Summer Program

Faculty Fellows Program courses are offered in the Summer sessions. Specific course offerings vary from year to year.

CLCS 297 Faculty Fellows Summer Program

Faculty Fellows Program courses are offered in the Summer sessions. Specific course offerings vary from year to year.

CLCS 300 (Re)Defining Masculinity

This course aims at (re)-defining masculinity, in other words at exploring what it is to be/ exist as a man in today's society. To paraphrase Simone de Beauvoir, is one born a man or does one become a man? (Re)-defining masculinity focuses on the recent developments of gender studies, namely the study of masculinity to include male power, sexualities, intimacy, families, language, sport, rap culture, etc.

CLCS 310 The Culture of Cities

Ever since its formation in the nineteenth century the metropolis has functioned as a multivalent metaphor for the experiences of "modern" life. Portrayed at once as a space of disruption and of stability, of danger and of creativity, the city has as found a place in the modernist and postmodernist imagination that reflects how a people's surroundings influence thought pattern and social practices. At the same time of course the needs of ever-evolving groups of inhabitants form the shape cities take. Taking Zurich as the case study, students will ask how overlapping and interacting slices of urban culture, ranging from the material (buildings, squares, streets and bridges), to the symbolic (narratives, myths and legends), and the performative (music, theater and film) shape our urban experience.

CLCS 320 Culture, Class, Cuisine: Questions of Taste

Food carries social, symbolic, and political-economic meaning that differs across cultures, and hence cuisine represents a focal point for studying divergent cultural practices. In that sense, this class examines the sociological, anthropological, literary, and cultural dimensions of food. The class will explore people's relationship to food with regard to the environment, gender roles, and social hierarchy, from French haute cuisine to the fast food phenomenon.

CLCS 330 The Politics of Mobility: Exile and Immigration

Beginning with the post-colonial theory of Edward Said and Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, this class will examine the ideas of exile and immigration in a colonial and post-colonial context. This course will explore exile vs. expatriatism, language and power, movement across cultures, narrative agency and authority, and voices in the new immigrant narrative. By approaching the topic from a comparative perspective, students will be exposed to a polyphony of voices and the variety of experiences associated with exile and the construction of identity. Students will examine, in particular, the variations on the autobiographical form in the context of this experience.(This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements).

CLCS 335 Hauntings

This creative writing/cultural theory course focuses on the concept of haunting and related phenomena such as possession or exorcism. The course draws from recent scholarly work in hauntology, a term coined by Jacques Derrida in his SpectresdeMarx (1993). What emerges from this area of research is an unusual theoretical space in which to consider literature and culture, both philosophically (as critical thinkers) and creatively (as authors and performance artists). The class explores and creatively experiments with texts that function primarily as a medium for giving voice to those realms of human experience that are generally considered unreasonable and extrasensory; otherworldly perceptions of parallel dimensions that transcend the laws and rational orderings of the knowable physical world. Students will reflect on ghostly metaphors and manifestations as they are summoned, in various forms and to different ends, by fiction writers, performers, and filmmakers who tend to link stories of haunting to social-psychic-emotional disturbances: expressions of diasporic sensibilities and hyphenated ethnicities, stigmas of invisibility related to shadows of class and gender, spectral polyvalence and the paranormal activity emerging from recent theoretical discourse around taboo conceptual couplings such as the queer child and/or the unruly/child.

CLCS 340 Fashion and Popular Culture

The focus of postmodernity on surface phenomena and diversity, its concern with the personal, the subjective and with identity have worked to make fashion a field of studies that has gained importance in the last 15 years. Aiming at getting past the age-old belief in the essential frivolity of fashion, this course examines how fashion draws upon recurrent instabilities of men and women (masculinity vs femininity, youth vs elderliness, domesticity vs worldliness, inclusion vs exclusion etc...) to thrive and express its creativity, how its ever constant shifting nature results in the notions of gender, ethnicity and class status to be ever more fluid, how it has been redefining the body and its image, in particular with the advent of the supermodel in the eighties, and last but not least, how it relates to and signifies within so many aspects of our daily life and environment, whether it be space (work vs domesticity, urban vs non-urban), photography (static vs dynamic), music (alternative vs pop) and sexuality.

CLCS 350 Culture and Human Rights

"Human Rights" has become a key selling point for organizations, political parties and social movements. And yet what is actually meant by the term often remains vague, and it is difficult to take the critical stance necessary to judge its significance. In this class students interrogate the term with a series of questions: what counts as "human" in the discourses surrounding Human Rights? What sorts of rights do individuals in fact have simply by virtue of being human? Do all humans have the same rights? Who gets to decide this? How has the definition changed over the last 200 years? To what extent is the term gendered, determined by class and racialized? And finally: how do different national settings change how we think about and act on ideas of Human Rights? This course will examine these questions by tracing ideas surrounding Human Rights in treatises, literary texts, films, debates and case studies from the Enlightenment to the present. Against the backdrop of foundational texts such as The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Thomas Paine's The Rights of Man, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley's Vindication of the Rights of Woman, declarations by the European Court of Human Rights, the African Court on Human and People's Rights, the Geneva convention and the United Nations Human Rights Commission students will consider literary and filmic works that grapple critically with the terms they lay out. Students will also consider how NGOs such as Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch translate the political rhetoric to apply their own interpretations of Human Rights to their field work. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements)

CLCS 360 Critical Race Studies in a Global Context

In this course, the class will work to create a more critical understanding of what race is, what race does, and how contemporary racial meanings are constructed and disseminated. In order to do so, students will explore Critical Race Theory (CRT) and critical theories of race in several contexts. CRT refers to a theory that emerged among legal educators in the US in the 1980s and 1990s. In the last twenty years, a growing number of scholars in fields such as cultural studies, gender studies, history, media studies, politics, postcolonial studies and sociology have integrated and developed the work done by critical race theorists. This course will focus in particular on this interdisciplinary approach to critical race studies. The practice of race will be examined as well as the policies and institutions that shape race in a global context in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Finally, students will consider the intersection of race and other social hierarchies, including gender, sexuality and social class.

CLCS 370 Topics in CLCS

Topics in CLCS are advanced courses on specific topics not normally offered and vary each semester. They may require additional prerequisites or permission of the instructor. Course description and prerequisites are specified in the session course description.

CLCS 371 Law and Culture

This course aims to investigate law's place in culture and culture's place in law. This focus proceeds from the realization that law does not function in a vacuum but exerts a powerful influence on all manner of cultural practice and production, even as its own operation is influenced in turn by various forms of culture. Given this increasing porosity and interpermeability of Law and different forms of culture, the focus of this course is on the mutual influence between law and other discursive practices, such as literature, TV sit-coms and film. In studying a number of prominent legal cases such as Brown v the Board of Education, we will explore the following questions: What are the mechanisms by which popular representations and cultural practices find their way into legal processes and decisions? How does law in turn bleed into and influence cultural processes? Does law act as a buffer against societal assumptions about, and constructions of, gender, age, ability, sexuality and ethnicity, or does it re-enforce and re-inscribe existing social norms? (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

CLCS 372 Tales of Catastrophe

The cultural debris that results from political and natural catastrophes is made up of narratives that contain both implosion and creation, wreckage and renewal. In that sense disasters mark pivotal turning points in the way we conceptualize and understand human phenomena and cultural processes in a number of disciplinary perspectives from psychoanalysis to literature, from environmental science to religion and from ethics to aesthetics. Students will read the narrative fallout in fiction, science, and film that emanate from distinct disaster zones ranging from the petrified texture of Pompeii to the generative force field of ground zero. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

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Computing

CPT 105 Introduction to Computing

This introductory course explores the fundamentals of personal computing essentials for students. The structure of the course utilizes both classroom lectures and computer classroom labs. A hands-on component will emphasize state of the art, personal computer productivity applications such as Microsoft Word, Excel, Power Point, elements of Microsoft Access, and basic website construction. The course also discusses how computers work, how to safeguard your computer and your data, elements of networking including cloud computing, and current events related to computing. This course assumes no prior knowledge of or experience in computing.

CPT 150 Introduction to Computer Programming

This course offers an introduction to computer programming using some high level language. Students will learn how to formulate, represent, and solve problems using the computer. Emphasis will be on the features common to most of these languages. After introducing data structures, expressions, functions, control structures, input and output, the course will proceed to classes, events, user interface construction, documentation, and program testing. Both procedural and object-oriented programming paradigms will be discussed.

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Creative Writing

CRW 100T Introduction to Creative Writing: Inventing Switzerland

This course presents an introduction to creative writing through a variety of genres, including poetry, prose, fiction and travel writing. By paying close attention to literary models and original student writing, this class asks that participants reflect on the relationship between reading and writing, between voice and context. Students will compile a portfolio that includes short pieces in a variety of genres and present them for critique in weekly workshops both on and off campus. This course features an important travel component, and will focus in particular on the stories we tell about Switzerland and its heroes and heroines. What are the narratives that characterize the land of cheese and chocolate? How have these tales been shaped by myths of Switzerland past and present? Examples will include important literary and cultural figures in French-speaking Switzerland (Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Madame de Stal, CF Ramuz, Blaise Cendrars) as well as Swiss travelers (Ella Maillart, Nicolas Bouvier) and iconic Swiss figures from Chevrolet to le Corbusier.

CRW 100 Introduction to Creative Writing

This course presents an introduction to creative writing through a variety of genres, including poetry, prose, fiction and non-fiction. By paying close attention both to literary models and original student writing, this class asks that participants reflect on the relationship between reading and writing, and voice and context. Students will compose short pieces in a variety of genres and present them for critique in weekly workshops. A final portfolio of all work during the semester will act as a springboard for more advanced courses in creative writing. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

CRW 110T Paris Protagonist: Lost in Translation

This Academic Travel and creative writing course creates the occasion for an intensive hybrid scholarly/creative encounter with a mythical urban landscape which figuratively lives and breathes, as a protagonist, through French literature and film. The travel component that underscores this course will also mark the culmination of this Parisian encounter, ushering students from the realm of theory to practice with daily (on-location/site-driven) writing prompts and workshop-style events designed to address the following key questions: What forms does this protagonist assume as s/he endures through time? What voices emerge from the space of her debris? What gets lost in translation and how can the dialogue between art and cultural theory aide us in finding our way through this impasse of loss? How can the deepening of a students cultural awareness help the City of Light avoid being subsumed by her own, distinctive, and almost irresistible, charme fatal? Three thematic modules will frame this exploration and create a groundwork on which to base the students intellectual discovery and experimentation as writers/travelers: the poetry of Charles Baudelaire highlights the unique experience of Parisian space; the contribution of Surrealism which both defines and defies the peculiarities of Parisian time; the French New Wave (contrasted to foreign cinematic renderings of Paris), with a focus on the twin concepts of translation-transfiguration, allegories of Light and Othering. Students enrolling in this course may expect dual-language editions of French literary sources and French films with English subtitles (when possible).

CRW 220 Creative Writing: Fiction

This creative writing course will focus on short forms of fiction. We will study masters of the genre, such as Joyce, Carver, Kinkaid and Cisneros, break their writing down into its component narrative parts, and use the insights gained in this exercise to create original forms of short fiction. We will pay particular emphasis on beginnings and endings, tension, character development, pacing and dialogue. Half of the course will take the form of workshops during which students perform in-class exercises based on readings, discuss and hone their own short story while offering constructive critiques of classmates' work. The joint outcome of the class will be a short anthology of vivid, surprising and original short stories.

CRW 225 Creative Writing: Poetry

In studying a number of poetic forms, such as the limerick, the haiku, the ballad, and the sonnet, and reading and analyzing examples of each, students learn to use meter, rhythm, and stanzaic pattern to form their own poems. Like the other creative writing courses at Franklin, this course has two distinct goals: the analysis of poetry written by others and the production of the student's own work in small and intense workshop settings. The final product will be a booklet of poems created by the class participants.

CRW 320 Advanced Creative Writing: Dramatic Writing

A writing workshop that allows students to explore drama, stage writing and screenwriting. Taught by experts in the fields of theatre and/or film, students have the opportunity to familiarize themselves with techniques and strategies of dramatic writing by studying other practitioners, to explore different voices, and to write their own monologues, dialogues, theatre pieces or screenplays.

CRW 325 Advanced Creative Writing Workshop

A writing workshop that allows students to explore different forms of prose writing including the traditional novel, the epistolary novel, and the graphic novel. This course will emphasize central techniques such as character, setting, beginnings and endings. Each week students will present sketches for critique in the writing workshop, and will compose a short piece of fiction for publication in the final class journal.

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Economics

ECN 100 Principles of Macroeconomics

This entry-level course in economics covers the fundamentals of macroeconomics and is aimed at students who choose it as an elective or plan to continue their studies in economics. Together with ECN 101, it provides the necessary prerequisites for any other upper-level course in economics. The course is a program requirement for the majors in International Banking and Finance, International Economics, International Relations, International Management, and Environmental Science. It is also a prerequisite for Economics as a combined major as well as a minor. This course introduces students to the study of economics as a field of knowledge within the social sciences. In the first part, focus will be on the definition, the explanation, and the significance of national income, business fluctuations, the price level, and aggregate employment. In the second part, special attention is devoted to the functioning of a payment system based on currency and bank money. Finally, students will discuss the instruments and the functioning of public policy aimed to stabilize prices and maintain high levels of output and employment within the current macroeconomic context. Current economic news will be regularly scrutinized.

ECN 101 Principles of Microeconomics

This is an entry-level course in economics, covering fundamentals of microeconomics and aimed at students who choose it as an elective or plan to continue their studies in economics. Together with ECN 100, it provides the necessary prerequisites for any other upper-level course in economics. It is a program requirement for the majors in International Banking and Finance, International Economics, International Management, International Relations, and Environmental Science. It is also a prerequisite for Economics as a combined major as well as a minor. This course helps students develop basic analytical skills in economics and microeconomics. It provides students with a basic understanding of the market system in advanced capitalist economies. It examines the logic of constrained choice with a focus on the economic behavior of individuals and organizations. After a theoretical analysis of the determinants and the interaction of supply and demand under competitive conditions, alternative market structures will be investigated, including monopolistic and oligopolistic forms. The course examines the conditions under which markets allocate resources efficiently and identifies causes of market failure and the appropriate government response. The introduction to the role of government includes its taxing and expenditure activities as well as regulatory policies.

ECN 204 History of Economic Thought

This intermediate-level course studies the evolution of economic ideas from the early Eighteenth century to modern times, with emphasis on the differing conceptions of economic life and the methodological underpinnings of three main strands of thought: Classical economics, Marginalism, and the Keynesian paradigm. The course is organized around four main themes: the source of wealth, the theory of value, economic growth and business cycle in the capitalist system, and the notion of equilibrium in economic analysis. The course aims at providing a systematic conceptual framework to investigate the development of economic ideas, in their intersections with philosophy and the political and historical evolution of societies, hence highlighting the nature of economics as a social science. At the same time, the course stresses the methodological features (in terms of a rigorous and formalized language) peculiar to the economic reasoning.

ECN 225 Issues and Controversies in Macroeconomics (Intermediate Macroeconomics)

This intermediate-level course in macroeconomics builds upon the introductory two-semester (ECN 100 and ECN 101) sequence and, in conjunction with ECN 256, prepares students to study upper-level economics. It is a program requirement for the majors in International Banking and Finance and International Economics, as well as for Economics as a combined major. It is also one of the options towards Economics as a minor. Students must have taken ECN 100 and ECN 101, and are also recommended to have taken MAT 200. This course is designed to provide students with an appreciation of current economic issues and questions in modern macroeconomics, through the recognition of economics as a controversial subject. In the first part, we review some important measurement issues in macroeconomics that have policy consequences. In the second part, students will explore the competing theoretical frameworks developed in the twentieth century to explain growth cycles, employment and inflation. Finally, the acquired knowledge will be applied to the current policy issues in the aftermath of the Great Recession.

ECN 256 Managerial Economics (Intermediate Microeconomics)

This intermediate-level course in microeconomics builds upon the introductory two-semester sequence and, in conjunction with ECN 225, prepares students to upper-level economics. It is a program requirement for the majors in International Banking and Finance and International Economics, as well as for Economics as a combined major. It is also one of the options towards Economics as a minor. This course completes the theoretical background on microeconomics and introduces students to more advanced topics, with an emphasis on the practical relevance and application of theory. The essence of the course is, in particular, the study of the interaction between rational individual decision-making (e.g. consumers, firms, the government) and the working of economic institutions like markets, regulation and social rules. Topics covered include an introduction to game theory, strategic behavior and entry deterrence; analysis of technological change; the internal organization of the firm; economic efficiency; public goods, externalities and information; government and business.

ECN 297 Faculty Fellows Program

Faculty Fellows Program courses are offered in the Summer sessions. Specific course offerings vary from year to year.

ECN 303 Development Economics

The course will introduce students to the evolution of theory and practice in economic development in three stages. First, models of economic growth and development including work by Harrod-Domar, Robert Solow, Arthur Lewis, and Michael Kremer are compared to provide students with a feeling for how economists have conceived of the development process. The class then proceeds to examine particular development issues such as population growth, stagnant agriculture, environmental degradation, illiteracy, gender disparities, and rapid urbanization to understand how these dynamics reinforce poverty and deprivation. In the final stage, students will read work by supporters as well as critics of international development assistance and use the knowledge and perspective they have gained thus far to independently evaluate efficacy of a specific development intervention.

ECN 305 Economics of the European Union

This course applies economic theory to some key economic institutions and policies of the European Union. It addresses some key issues in the process of European economic integration, under three broad groups: the degree of economic integration historically achieved with the common market and the European Monetary System; an analysis of the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) regime; an economic analysis of the changes related to EU enlargement, both for old and new members. Questions discussed include the question whether there is an economic case for EMU, current issues with respect to fiscal, monetary, and labour market policies, and the problems that lie ahead until broader adoption of the euro. (Recommended ECN 256)

ECN 320 Game Theory, Information, and Contracts

The course investigates in a simple but rigorous way some of the fundamental issues of modern microeconomics, exploring the main concepts of game theory, as well as the basic elements of the economics of information, and of contract theory. A solid background on these topics is essential to the investigation of strategic decision making, the assessment of the relevance of asymmetric and/or incomplete information in decision processes, and the design of contracts. These, in turn, are among the most important issues that firms and individuals commonly need to face in all situations in which the consequences of individual decisions are likely to depend on the strategic interactions among agents' actions, and on the signaling value of information. Proceeding from intuition to formal analysis, the course investigates the methodological approach of game theory (allowing for a systematic analysis of strategic interaction) and the main concepts of the economics of information (allowing to assess the effects of asymmetric or incomplete information on agents' decisions). Further, it combines both game theory and economics of information to provide an introduction to the essential elements of contract theory.

ECN 325 Money, Banking and Financial Markets

This upper-level course in economics is the first part of an ideal two-semester sequence including ECN 328. It is a program requirement for the major in International Economics, International Banking and Finance, and International Management with an emphasis in Finance. It also fulfils group requirements towards the major in International Economics with an emphasis in Political Economy, and Economics as a Combined major as well as a Minor.This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the monetary dimension of contemporary economies. This includes the nature of the means of settlement, the technology of monetary payments, the banking system and its pro-cyclical, crisis-prone character that requires control and regulation, the response of financial markets to changing policy conditions and perceived risks, and central banks operations and goals when setting interest rates. Special attention is devoted to current monetary policy issues with special reference (but not limited) to the practice of the U.S. Fed and the European Central Bank. Recommended prerequisite: ECN 225, ECN 256, BUS 326

ECN 328 International Banking and Finance

This upper-level course in economics is the second part of an ideal two-semester sequence including ECN 325. It is a program requirement for the major in International Economics and International Banking and Finance. It also fulfils group requirements towards the major in International Economics with an emphasis in Political Economy, and Economics as a Combined major as well as a Minor. This course is designed to provide students with an appreciation of the meaning and consequence of international monetary relations, notably with respect to cross-border payments and investments under different monetary, banking, financial, and political institutions. In the first part, the class will investigate currency exposure, the currency market and its actors, the determination of exchange rates, measures and indices of the external value of a currency. In the second part, focus will be on the structure of balance-of-payments accounting, the size and significance of current account imbalances, and exchange rate policies. Finally, students will study monetary unions with special reference to the current issues and future prospects of Economic and Monetary Union in Europe. Recommended prerequisite: ECN 225, ECN 256, ECN 325

ECN 330T Neo-liberal India: Globalization and Development

India has often been described as one of the developing countries that has achieved considerable economic success by following a neo-liberal policy regime in the past twenty years. However, over the last two years, Indias growth has stagnated. Moreover, a substantial part of the population continues to live below the poverty line and lack access to basic services like clean water, health care, education etc. This course has been designed to use India as a case study to investigate the impact of globalization on development and will introduce students to different facets of globalization and allow students to understand the complicated interrelations between globalization and development. Students will study about labour reforms, environmental sustainability, politics of land grab, agricultural policies, urbanization-all within the framework of political economy of globalization and economic development. Students will be introduced to the flourishing IT and financial service sector, one of the main beneficiaries of globalization and the impact these sectors have had on Indias growing middle class. Students will then be introduced to the problems and issues faced in the semi urban regions of the country. This travel course will allow students to observe and recognize the causes of uneven growth and the consequent impact on peoples standards of living.

ECN 331T Sustainable Economic Development: Exploring Bhutan and Kaziranga

Orthodox economics has traditionally prioritized efficiency over sustainability. With the recent declaration of the Sustainable Development Goals by the United Nations, sustainability has become central in mainstream economic and policy discussions, thereby challenging many fundamental building blocks of economics. This Academic Travel course will examine the different approaches used in economics to study sustainability within the context of economic development. This will include both mainstream approaches that use neoclassical assumptions of market clearing and rational choice theory, and non-mainstream approaches including Marxian economics, Ecological economics, and Institutional economics. The course will then explore the relationships between sustainability and various economic and political issues like employment generation, property and resource rights, modes of production, economic growth, and poverty. The aim of this course is to provide students with tools that will allow them to critically examine various approaches to sustainable development. The travel component will include visits to Kaziranga (in the eastern state of Assam in India) and Bhutan. Kaziranga, with an area of approximately 400 square kilometres, is situated in the Brahmaputra river valley which is a major transnational Asian river (flowing through India, China and Bangladesh). It is a UNESCO world heritage site and is home to several endangered species of animals including one horned rhinos and Asian elephants. Visit to this area will offer students an opportunity to learn about the complex interplay between economic development and a unique grassland ecosystem. In Bhutan, students will specifically look into the issues of sustainable agriculture and sustainable tourism in the specific context of fragile mountain environment. The travel component will allow students to observe two extremely diverse geographical areas and yet make insightful conclusions about sustainability and economic growth. (It is highly recommended that students have completed ECN 100 with a grade of at least C.) This Academic Travel carries a supplemental fee, to be announced prior to registration.

ECN 341 International Trade

This course will introduce students to the major theories and tools used in the study of international trade. Particular attention will be paid to deriving, analyzing, and assessing the empirical evidence for and against the Ricardian and Heckscher-Ohlin conceptions of comparative advantage, the Stolper-Samuelson Factor-Price Equalization Theorem, and New Trade Theories based on assumptions of imperfect competition. Students will become skilled at using a variety of graphical devices including offer curves to describe the effect which variations in government policy, factor dynamics, country size, technology, tastes, and transport costs will have on the terms of as well as the magnitude and distribution of the gains from trade. (With professor permission, students may take this course with no ECN 256 prerequisite.)

ECN 350 Industrial Economics

This course studies the market behavior of firms with market power. Topics like oligopoly, price discrimination, vertical relations between firms, product differentiation, advertising and entry barriers represent the core of the course. These concepts will be applied to the specific case of European firms, which live in an economic and monetary union. Students will study the principles of European competition policy and some famous European antitrust cases. A comparison with American antitrust will be made.

ECN 355 Political Economy: Theories and Issues

This course is designed to introduce students to the foundations of political economy. In this course, students will study the economic system from a critical, historical and interdisciplinary perspective and in doing so will gain a greater understanding of our current economic system. Students will learn about different theories in political economy and how these theories help us understand the transformation of a pre capitalist system to a capitalist system. Some of the schools of thoughts that students will be introduced to are Institutional, Marxian, Post-Keynesian and Austrian. This course will also draw from these various theories and examine their implications for different issues that arise from the current economic formation. Some of the issues that will be considered in this course are social and economic inequality, gender inequality, the relationship of the economic sphere to the ecology, power relations and conflict in modern society, political economy of poverty and uneven development. (This writing intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements).

ECN 365 Investment Analysis I

This course focuses on the basic concepts of value and risk, and explores the principles that guide strategic investment decisions. Major emphasis is placed on the notion of net present value, the evaluation and pricing of bonds and stocks, and the definition and measurement of risk. The concepts of portfolio risk and expected return, as well as the role of portfolio diversification are carefully investigated. Students are then introduced to market efficiency, portfolio theory and the relationship between risk and return in the context of alternative theories, mainly the capital asset pricing model and the arbitrage pricing theory. (Recommended: ECN 225, ECN 256; Strongly Recommended: MAT 200)

ECN 366 Investment Analysis II (Corporate Finance)

This course focuses on the financing decisions of firms. After an introduction to the questions related to the definition of debt policy and the capital structure of the firm, the course investigates the problems related to the issue of securities and dividend policy, as well as the impact of corporate taxes and the costs associated to bankruptcy, financial distress and conflicts of interest. The second part of the course studies the fundamentals of option pricing theory and the valuation of options - with applications to warrants and convertible bonds - and provides an introduction to the use of derivatives for hedging financial risk.

ECN 387 Introduction to Econometrics

The course introduces the basic principles of econometrics as a set of tools and techniques to quantitatively investigate a variety of economic and financial issues. The application of econometric methods allows studying the relationships between different economic and financial variables, hence providing a natural way to test and confront alternative theories and conjectures, as well as to forecast and simulate the effects of different economic and financial policies. The course approach is mainly focused on applications. A discussion of the main theoretical issues and a systematic analysis of econometric tools are prerequisites for the investigation of a number of economic and financial applications.

ECN 490 Senior Research Project in International Economics

Research proposals are to be coordinated with the Department Chair.

ECN 492 Internship in International Economics

Internship experiences are to be coordinated in advance with the Department Chair.

ECN 494 Internship in International Banking and Finance

Internship experiences are to be coordinated in advance with the Department Chair.

ECN 495 Senior Research Project in International Banking and Finance

Research proposals are to be coordinated with the Department Chair.

ECN 497 Special Topics Research Seminar in Economics and Finance

This course is offered when students and instructors arrange a special seminar on material that is beyond the scope of a particular course. It is open to students majoring in IE or IBF with Department Head permission. The course must be supervised by an Economics Department faculty member to be counted towards the major.

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English Language Teaching

ELT 102 Introduction to English Language Teaching

Students in this course develop the fundamental skills and knowledge for teaching English as a foreign language. In addition to course lectures and discussions on language pedagogy, students practice teaching to non-native speakers of different proficiency levels. Students begin with small segments of a lesson and work up towards an entire lesson, their teaching is observed and they are given feedback and assessment. Students consider learning styles, factors affecting learning, teacher roles, classroom management, skills areas (reading, writing, listening, speaking) and other aspects of English language teaching. The emphasis throughout is on classroom teaching techniques and decision-making using communicative approaches.

ELT 251 The English Language

The purpose of this course is to increase the awareness of the English language on the part of students interested in teaching English to speakers of other languages. Students are introduced to pedagogical grammars and other linguistic descriptions of English, including study of the sound system of English. The course includes a thorough and systematic review of the grammatical systems of the language itself, and students practice presenting and explaining those structures as clearly as possible. They also gain experience in writing practice exercises, and in parsing and analyzing authentic English texts to make plain their structure and their syntax. The course also considers the levels of competence through which learners of the language generally pass, and the practical descriptions of these that are widely used such as the Common European Framework of Reference.

ELT 252 World Englishes

This course forms part of the ELT Certificate, but is also accessible to students who are interested in discovering more about the role English plays in the world today and its place in international communication. Students will research and discuss topics such as Kachru's circles of English, linguistic and cultural imperialism, English as a gateway language, and its post-colonial role in language death. Furthermore, students will delve into the native vs. non-native speaker debate, as well as exploring the use of English as a Lingua Franca and the position of English as an International Language. This will involve in-depth reading of authors such as Crystal, Kachru, Phillipson and Pennycook, and students will explore issues raised in research classes as they develop an understanding of the social, cultural and political ramifications behind the usage of different Englishes. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

ELT 277 Practicum in English Language Teaching

This practicum provides experience in teaching English as a second language. Practicum students engage in reflective teaching, further developing their institutional skills and their knowledge of important aspects of English language pedagogy. The course includes supervised lesson planning, teaching practice, feedback on teaching, peer observation, observation of professional teachers and consultation time. Students reflect on their experience in classroom discussions and through systematic self-assessment posts after each lesson. The practicum course will address lesson planning, assessment, classroom management, materials development, presentation and teaching of grammar, vocabulary and other language items, error correction, and the teaching and learning of specific language skills (spoken production, spoken interaction, listening, reading and writing). In addition to regular observed teaching practice, participants are given guidance in planning the syllabus, selecting materials, and tailoring the course to the needs of the learners. Note: ELT 277 can be repeated for credit. (Prerequisite ELT 102. Recommended ELT 251 or 252)

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Environmental Studies

ENV 100 Global Green Initiative

This intensive course explores various aspects of rivers, lakes, and groundwater. It provides an introduction to the distinct ecology of these three freshwater systems, their human uses, different approaches to their conservation, and possibilities for restoration of degraded systems. Course material will be presented and studied through a combination of lectures, case-studies analyses, and group activities. Additionally, several short field trips to local points of interest, along with a week-end trip to the Lago Ritom and Lago Cadagno, will provide students with numerous opportunities to connect class material with their everyday experience.

ENV 101 Chemistry and the Environment

This course introduces students to the science of chemistry through the context of environmental issues such as global climate change, ozone depletion, air pollution, water quality and alternative energy. Chemical concepts covered include stoichiometry, the mole concept, the behavior of gases, liquids and solids, acids and bases, thermochemistry, electronic structure of atoms, chemical bonding, and some basic organic chemistry. This course will include occasional lab sessions.

ENV 102 Alpine Ecology

This course will introduce students to the functioning and the ecology of the various environments found in the Swiss Alps. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, the course will also explore the economic, political, and social aspects of the Swiss Alps. There will be several off-campus excursions to local points of interests including the lakes of Ritom and Cadagno in Val Piora, the river Brenno, and an alpine glacier.

ENV 199 First Year Seminar

First Year Seminar topics vary from year to year. Please see the current schedule for more information on this offering.

ENV 200 Understanding Environmental Issues

This case study based course serves as the bridge experience for students completing their introductory course requirements for the ESS major or the ENV minor and who are now moving into the upper-level courses (However it is open to all interested students meeting the pre-requisite). Through detailed examination of several case studies at the local, regional, and global levels, students synthesize material from introductory level courses to explore the interdisciplinary nature of todays environmental issues. They examine what different disciplines offer to our understanding of and attempt to solve these issues.

ENV 210 Natural Disasters, Catastrophes, and the Environment

As long as humans have walked the planet, they have faced dangers from the environment, such as earthquakes, floods, and volcanoes. Today's technology creates new possibilities for disasters, including climate change, killer smog, and nuclear accidents. Students in this course will study the science behind natural disasters as well as examine society's preparedness for and response to these problems from an interdisciplinary perspective. It will look at both historical and recent events and consider what disasters await us in the future. Students who have already taken SCI 110 must obtain permission to enroll.

ENV 220 Ecocritical Approaches to Literature

This interdisciplinary course will introduce students to environmental literary criticism, more commonly known since the 1990s as ecocriticism. As a theoretical approach to literature, eco-criticism provides a secondary lens through which to analyze primary sources; an eco-critical approach focuses on how these primary sources have constructed our relationship to the natural world through writing and narrative. In applying eco-critical theory to a selection of primary fiction, students will examine some of the major environmental themes found in literature, among others: land use, speciesism, climate change, environmental apocalypse, and the post-human. Students will explore these themes using some of the basic critical tools and methodologies of ecocriticism, not only to explore how authors write about the environment, but also to examine how the environment itself is constructed through aesthetic discourse. Students should leave the course with improved critical environmental literacy skills that will enable interdisciplinary reflection about our interactions with the natural environment.

ENV 230 Perspectives on Freshwater Conservation

This course explores the issues involved with the conservation of freshwater ecosystems. It includes an examination of the distinctive ecology of lake and river systems, the human use of these systems, existing conservation policy at the national level in different countries, and possibilities for restoration of degraded systems. This course includes several required field trips to regional lakes and rivers.

ENV 230T Freshwater Conservation

This course explores various aspects of rivers, freshwater lakes, and groundwater aquifers. It provides an introduction to the distinct ecology of these three freshwater systems, their human uses, different approaches to their conservation, possibilities for restoration of degraded systems, and a look at the role that lakes and rivers play in international relationships. During Academic Travel, the class will visit various freshwater systems and will also practice field data collection techniques. Tentatively, the travel will take place in North-East Italy and Slovenia. This course may also include shorter day-trips to local points of interests.

ENV 250 Quantitative Methods for Environmental Science

The course exposes students to a range of quantitative methods used in the environmental sciences. It will introduce students to the science of geographic information systems (GIS) and their use in understanding and analyzing environmental issues. Students will gain hands-on experience with GIS software. This course will also examine statistical methods commonly applied in quantitative environmental research. It assumes students already possess a background in statistics and environmental science.

ENV 280T Managing the New Zealand Environment

This course examines the management of environmental resources in New Zealand and the discourse of sustainability from the island's perspective. It will focus on the challenge of conserving New Zealand's flora and fauna, as well as New Zealand's aggressive management of the non-native species that have arrived since human settlement. It will examine attempts to restore natural habitats through visits to the several restoration projects, and to Christchurch to study how environmental concerns are being incorporated into the city's recovery from the devastating 2010 and 2011 earthquakes. The course will also scrutinize the effects of tourism on the New Zealand environment and the opportunities that tourism also present. Lastly, the course will explore how the Maori culture influences environmental management in the country. (Previous coursework in environmental studies recommended.)

ENV 281T Managing Ecosystems in the American Rockies

(This course must be taken in conjunction with ENV 297) This course will investigate and critically analyze the role of changing priorities, new opportunities, and diverse threats in shaping the historical, current, and future management of natural resources in the U.S. Rocky Mountains. Using Yellowstone National Park and the surrounding system of national forests and protected areas as the classroom, this course will introduce students to the main ecosystems of the Northern US Rockies. It will examine the effect of past and current management policies on regional forests, especially with respect to wildfires and invasive species. It will also investigate how rivers and lakes are managed in a region where water demands are increasing, fisheries are an important economic revenue, and non-native species are spreading. Finally, it will explore the opportunities and issues associated with the management of wildlife and its interactions with humans, with a special emphasis on large predators.

ENV 282T Tourism and the Environment: Iceland

This course explores the environmental impacts of tourism and travel. It examines the problems generated by travelers as they journey from home locations to travel destinations and as they participate in activities at those destinations. It focuses on issues of air pollution, biodiversity, climate change, resource use, and waste management. It also considers the potential for positive impacts from tourism, examining how tourism can contribute to improved management of environmental resources. The course engages students with the ethics of responsible travel and examines various attempts to mitigate problems through different forms of sustainable tourism, policies, and tools (e.g. carbon offsets and eco-labels). The course includes a 12-day field experience in Iceland where students will examine first-hand the problems and potentials generated by that country's rapid increase in tourism. Students will also meet with stakeholders in the Icelandic tourism industry to discuss local and national responses to the increased levels of tourism. (This course carries a supplemental fee, to be determined).

ENV 297 Faculty Fellows Summer Program

Faculty Fellows Program courses are offered in the Summer sessions. Specific course offerings vary from year to year.

ENV 350 Swiss Environments

Fundamental for every student who wants to have a complete Swiss experience while at Franklin University, this course will explore multiple topics associated with Swiss natural environments. While focusing on the ecology of the various environments present in Switzerland, the course aims at providing students with the tools necessary to understand how Swiss natural resources are managed and exploited. Specifically, students will explore the cultural and economical importance of Swiss natural resources, the policies behind their exploitation and management, the drivers of the strong environmental consciousness in Swiss society, and relationships with neighboring countries sharing natural resources with Switzerland. The course will end with an examination of the multifaceted challenges Switzerland faces in managing its natural resources and environments. Multiple day trips to local points of interests and possibly a weekend excursion in the Alps are required.

ENV 360 Research Methods in Environmental Sciences

This course integrates field, laboratory, computing, and statistical methodologies commonly employed in environmental sampling. The course will also emphasize professional presentation and scientific report writing skills. It includes a mandatory weekend field trip, as well as local field trips.

ENV 372 Sustainability Science

This seminar-style course will examine the emergent field of sustainability as well as the science it employs to understand and manage the interactions between human society and the natural world. It will trace the development of our understanding of sustainability and its importance in the contemporary world. It will examine key processes driving global change in areas such as biodiversity, climate, energy use, pollution, population growth, public health, and urbanization, as well as provide an overview of the tools we use to measure sustainability. Lastly, it will explore some of the innovative approaches people are employing to address contemporary problems and effect a transition to a more sustainable society. Students in the course will apply their learning in a project that develops a solution for a particular sustainability problem on campus, locally, or somewhere on the globe. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

ENV 399 Research in Environmental Studies

The research project is an opportunity for the student to pursue independent research either at Franklin or with an approved external partner. May be used in preparation for ENV 499, the senior research project or thesis.

ENV 497 Senior Capstone

This course serves as the capstone course for students in the Environmental Sciences and Studies program. Students synthesize the material from the courses in the major and demonstrate their ability to apply knowledge this knowledge to contemporary environmental issues. Junior status required

ENV 498 Internship in Environmental Studies

This course provides credit for a professional experience in the environmental field in a public, private, or non-profit organization anywhere in the world. Throughout the internship period, the student should ensure close on-site supervision. Students should follow guidelines laid out in Franklins Internship Handbook and the ENV 498 syllabus.

ENV 499 Senior Research Project in Environmental Studies

The research project is an opportunity for the student to pursue independent research or a professional project on a topic related to the student's course of study. Depending on the student's career path, the research can be classified either as a research project or a thesis.

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First Year Seminar

FYS 199 First Year Seminar

Spring Seminar topics change year to year. Please consult the Schedule of Classes for current seminar offerings.

FYS 399 Academic Mentoring

This course is for students selected as Academic Mentors in the context of the First Year Experience. Academic Mentors are assigned to individual first-year seminars and work as a group on academic leadership and research. Using the content and classroom of the first year seminars as a context, this 300-level course provides students with the opportunity to learn and practice advanced academic leadership skills including: research, writing, teaching, and tutoring skills. Student will be expected to complete course readings over the summer, before the course begins. During the semester, students will participate actively in class and typically organize and evaluate the final public presentation. Academic Mentors will meet periodically as a group outside of their individual seminars.

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French Studies

FRE 100 Introductory French, Part I

The beginning courses stress the understanding and speaking of the language. As students progress through elementary conversation, more grammar study is introduced, and reading and composition skills are developed.

FRE 101 Introductory French, Part II

The beginning courses stress the understanding and speaking of the language. As students progress through elementary conversation, more grammar study is introduced, and reading and composition skills are developed.

FRE 199 First Year Seminar

First Year Seminar topics vary from year to year, please see the current course schedule for specific information.

FRE 200 Intermediate French, Part I

For students with one year of language study. The course presents short readings inviting conversation and a review and expansion of written command of basic grammatical structures. Communicative and meaningful use of the language is stressed.

FRE 201 Intermediate French, Part II

For students with one year of language study. The course presents short readings inviting conversation and a review and expansion of written command of basic grammatical structures. Communicative and meaningful use of the language is stressed.

FRE 300 Advanced French, Part I

For students who have completed at least two years of college-level language studies or the equivalent. This sequence offers cultural readings from a variety of sources, including some literary pieces, as well as magazine and newspaper articles reflecting the contemporary scene in the countries where the language is spoken. Vocabulary expansion and development of techniques of expression are accomplished through oral and written exercises.

FRE 301 Advanced French, Part II

For students who have completed at least two years of college-level language studies or the equivalent. This sequence offers cultural readings from a variety of sources, including some literary pieces, as well as magazine and newspaper articles reflecting the contemporary scene in the countries where the language is spoken. Vocabulary expansion and development of techniques of expression are accomplished through oral and written exercises.

FRE 302 Advanced French Conversation

This course uses techniques of oral expression to develop greater conversational fluency and accuracy. Conversational practice uses outstanding French films as springboards for classroom French-language discussion and instruction in the full range of language proficiencies in an array of different contexts and situations. Movies will be partially watched outside of class.

FRE 303 French Translation

This course first aims at showing students how translation studies are very much concerned with interpretative categories such as gender, race, and class. It is then designed to reinforce student knowledge and understanding of different linguistic systems. It finally results in sharpening an awareness of the distinctive characteristics of both French and English cultures and languages through the translation of literary and non-literary texts.

FRE 310 Paris and the 19th Century

This course presents a thorough introduction to the literature and culture of the city, and particularly Paris, in the nineteenth century. This class will focus on the historical and cultural factors that contributed to the rise of the city as well as on the literature that shapes our understanding of this period. Close attention will be paid to issues such as social class, gender, mobility, and space.

FRE 312 Travel Writing: France and French-speaking Switzerland

This course explores the genre of travel writing in France and French-speaking Switzerland in the 20th and 21st centuries. In particular, this class will propose travel writing as a useful literary trope with which to reconsider our understandings of national literatures. Special attention will be paid to the notion of the journey, both literal and figurative, and to the traveler's gaze. We will consider the historical and social implications of gender, race, ethnicity and social class in the various texts presented.

FRE 320 Writing the Self: French Autobiography and Autofiction

In the mid-70s, while the literary critic Philippe Lejeune was trying to define the autobiographical genre, several writers were, through their writing practices, questioning that very same genre, offering new ways to write (about) the self. Since then, the word autobiography has been replaced by autofiction, a genre that has become so popular in France that it has lost the meaning his initiator, Serge Doubrovsky, had theorized shortly after his first autofiction was published. This course explores the evolution of the auto- biographical genre since the mid-70s and tries to answer questions such as how one writes about oneself, what it means to write about oneself, the (im)possibility to write the self through the study of writers such as Georges Perec, Serge Doubrovsky, Annie Ernaux, Camille Laurens.

FRE 324 Exile, Margins and Identity in Francophone Literature of North-African Origins

This course focuses on fictional works written by authors whose identities straddle the Mediterranean. Whether they immigrated from Algeria, Tunisia or Morocco to France or were born in France to immigrant parents, these writers have found an outlet for the expression of their personal experience in writing. These fictions gives rise to a number of issues such as the important role French people of Maghreb origins have played in the cultural shaping of France since the independence of the countries mentioned above, the subsequent interior colonialism they were and are still subject to, the topographical and social divides that separate the different ethnic strata of French society, the gender issues that have developed since the "regroupement familial" in 1974. As a complement to the readings, students will see different documentaries and / or films that will sociologically, historically and culturally frame these issues.

FRE 325 Representation of the Shoah in French Literature and Cinema

In L'criture ou la vie, Georges Semprun wondered how survivors could tell their stories, readers could imagine the Shoah, an event that 70 years after it took place constitutes an epistemological and ontological caesura in the sense that it brings forth the fundamental issue of representation and its limits, the (im)possibility of language and images to convey it, the expression of our (in)humanity. Through diverse books and films, this course examines the relation between words, images on the one hand and things / reality on the other, between text and hors texte, and explore how some writers have not so much tried to represent the Shoah as reflect on the way the Shoah can be written and filmed.

FRE 350 French Civilization

This course focuses on parts of French history, French geography, French politics and French culture in order to have students understand twentieth- and twenty-first century France.

FRE 370 Topics in French Literature

Topics in French literature vary from year to year. Topics studied offer an overview of selected major works and periods, while also allowing the study of a unifying theme or genre in greater depth. Possible seminar topics include: The Representation of the Shoah in Francophone Novels, The Representation of Masculinity in French Novels Since The 1980's, French Novels and Their Cinematic Representations, and Travel Literature in the Francophone World. Note: Titles and authors may vary according to the topic and may require certain prerequisites.

FRE 372 Distinction in French Literature: From the 17th to the 21st Century

Throughout the centuries, writers have imagined and created characters who strive to distinguish themselves. Origins, education, social milieu, gender, and ability are just some of the ways that literary characters determine how they establish, assert, and distinguish themselves from others. Starting with Molire in the 17th century and ending with Philippe Vilain in the 21st century, this course will examine how distinction is expressed and represented in different literary genres including comedy, the philosophical tale, novels, and autofiction. This course offers a critical perspective on the notion of distinction in modern French literature through the exploration of primary texts. Taught in French.

FRE 374 Introduction to French Cinema

The course examines French films from Jean Vigo's Zero de conduite (1933) to Robert Bresson's Un condamne a mort s'est echappe (1956). It explores the art of cinematography while considering the aesthetics, historical, political, sociological, and psychoanalytical frames within which each movie was realized. It furthermore provides students with analytical tools to enable them to develop their own personal approach when viewing, discussing, and writing about a film.

FRE 376 French Cinema: The New Wave

The French New Wave was a major turning-point in the history of French Cinema. It gave birth to a new way of approaching cinematography as a whole. This course centers on New Wave film directors Chabrol, Truffaut, Resnais, Godard and Varda, and examine closely their cinematographic creed, theoretical preoccupations, similarities and differences. Movies will be partially watched outside of class.

FRE 497 Senior Seminar in French Studies

The Senior Seminar in the French Studies major represents a culmination of the multicultural experience at Franklin University. The seminar will create a forum for the research and presentation of an original senior project in French. This capstone seminar will not only bring together work done in other courses in the French Studies major, but will offer a chance to reflect on and integrate academic travel courses and study abroad into their final product. Possible final projects include a thesis, a performance, a video essay, or a portfolio of creative work. Projects will be designed and completed in consultation with the instructor and the student's major advisor.

FRE 499 French Senior Thesis

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Geography

GEO 101 Introduction to Physical Geography

This course examines the various systems of the physical Earth, including the atmosphere, climatic regimes, landforms, soils, waters and life forms. This course includes several required field trips to local points of interest.

GEO 125T Venice as a Geographic Topos for Discovery

This cross-disciplinary course focuses on a geographical topos--the city of Venice. Venice becomes the catalyst for multidisciplinary analysis as students are encouraged to adopt different angles of vision in order to explore the historical, cultural, artistic, social, and environmental dimensions of the city. Students read from a bibliography that allows them to discover Venice in its different contexts. Studies include the origin of Venice as a Byzantine province, the development of independent and long-standing political institutions, the origin of banking, the flourishing of commerce, technical innovations, architecture, literature and the arts. Students will consider the role of Venice as a world political and financial power and its role as a city of tourists, as well as using the city as a case study in sustainable social and economic development.

GEO 130T Blooming Landscapes in Eastern Germany?

In June 1990, FRG-chancellor Helmut Kohl (West Germany, Federal Republic of Germany) used the phrase blooming landscapes to describe his prediction (or maybe just vision) of the economic future of Eastern Germany, then still the German Democratic Republic but soon to be reunited with Western Germany. This phrase has been quoted often in the following years, since the economic development of Eastern Germany was not as fast as many had hoped, and the standard of living in Eastern Germany is, even now, still behind the western part. In this course students will focus on the economic, political, and societal changes in Eastern Germany since 1990. To understand them, history between 1920 and 1990 has also to be discussed in detail. Students will look at the difficulties of the transition into democracy and market economy, and also other cases where countries have merged or split, or intend to do so. The Academic Travel component of this course may include visits to Berlin and Eastern German cities such as Leipzig, Chemnitz, Cottbus, or Dresden.

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German Studies

GER 100 Introductory German, Part I

The beginning courses stress the understanding and speaking of the language. As students progress through elementary conversation, more grammar study is introduced and reading and composition skills are developed.

GER 101 Introductory German, Part II

The beginning courses stress the understanding and speaking of the language. As students progress through elementary conversation, more grammar study is introduced and reading and composition skills are developed.

GER 200 Intermediate German, Part I

The sequence completes and expands upon students' command of the structural foundation of the language. Communicative and meaningful use of the lan- guage is stressed through interactive activities using short texts, scripting and videotaping of presentations, etc.

GER 201 Intermediate German, Part II

The sequence completes and expands upon students' command of the structural foundation of the language. Communicative and meaningful use of the language is stressed through interactive activities using short texts, scripting and videotaping of presentations, etc.

GER 300 Advanced German, Part I

For students who have completed at least two years of college-level language studies or the equivalent. This course offers cultural readings from a variety of sources, including some literary pieces, as well as magazine and newspaper articles reflecting the contemporary scene in the countries where the language is spoken. Vocabulary expansion and development of techniques of expression are accomplished through oral and written exercises.

GER 301 Advanced German, Part II

For students who have completed at least two years of college or university-level language studies or the equivalent. This course offers cultural readings from a variety of sources, including some literary pieces, as well as magazine and newspaper articles reflecting the contemporary scene in the countries where the language is spoken. Vocabulary expansion and development of techniques of expression are accomplished through oral and written exercises.This course has a substantial reading, writing and speaking requirement.

GER 302 Advanced German Conversation

This course uses techniques of oral expression to develop greater conversational fluency and accuracy. Conversational practice is based on topics in the culture and contemporary civilization related to the language.

GER 370 Topics in German Literature

Topics in German literature vary from year to year. These are advanced courses for students with full comprehension of written and spoken German. Topics studied offer an overview of selected major works and periods, while also allowing the study of a unifying theme or genre in greater depth. If this course is available in English translation it may be taken as LIT 236. Note: Course number, title and authors may vary according to the topic.

GER 371T The Berlin Wall: Division and Unification in Narratives, Architecture and Politics

When asked where they were and what they were doing when they heard about the fall of the Berlin wall, most people who were adults at the time can tell you in fair detail. Indeed, the fall of the wall, and the political and cultural upheavals that ensued, has had a geopolitical effect similar to that of the moon landing or the murder of John F. Kennedy. And yet for today's students, the notion of a divided Germany, of the co-existence of two separate regimes (the BRD, or West Germany, and the DDR, or East Germany), and even of the wall itself, is distant history rather than lived experience. The focus of this travel is to animate that history by taking students to the original sites of the divide, and to what remains of the wall; to study what led up to and away from November 9, 1989, in literature, documentaries, history books, and in discussion with witnesses; to explore the remnants of the Stasi, the former East German secret police; and to sample Ostalgia, complete with a taste of authentic DDR cuisine and a ride in a Trabi. This course has no prerequisites if taken for German cultural credit. There is also an option to take it as a CLCS course, also without prerequisites. To take it as a German language credit, students must have completed GER 300 with a C, or have obtained the instructors permission. (Students are responsible for their own transport to and from Berlin.)

GER 373 German Film as Medium of Culture

This course examines important issues in the cultural life of Germany through the medium of film, to which the German contribution has been foundational and continuously innovative. Texts are included to provide background, context or a look at parallel literary expression.

GER 374 Strangers in Paradise?: Historical and Cultural Texts on Immigration into Switzerland

This course will trace the different waves of immigration into Switzerland through the lens of cultural and political texts produced in German (or translated into German) over the last thirty years, both by those who have immigrated to Switzerland and by Swiss natives in reaction to the immigrants' presence. We will begin our examination of the various tensions immigration has engendered with Rolf Lyssy's film Die Schweizermacher, a comedy about the hurdles facing would-be naturalized citizens in the mid-seventies. Next, in a variety of literary, filmic and legal texts, we will look at the situation of Italians, Spaniards,Tamils, Turks, immigrants from Balkan countries, and, most recently, from Iraq. Finally, we will study the contemporary campaigns of the Swiss People's Party (SVP), and the heated debates fueled by their right-wing provocations about who does and does not belong in this "paradise" known as Switzerland. This course is taught in German.

GER 376 Screening Swissness: An Introduction to Swiss-German Film

This course will trace the development of Swiss-German film over the last several decades paying close attention to motives such as gender, the tension between city/countryside, ideas of Swiss identity, depictions of foreigners, and Swissness. Swiss-German film made its entry on the international stage in the thirties, with films that reacted to the threat of war and critically reflected on the notion of the Geistige Landesverteidigung, or the spiritual resistance, a concept, which should become a rallying call during World War Two. The fifties and sixties with the so-called Gotthelf Filme, in which Jeremias Gotthelf's novels and stories were brought to the big screen in beautiful black and white renditions that fuelled the national imaginary with more soothing notions of what it meant to be Swiss followed the earlier critical stances. A host of related Heimatfilme-films in which the nineteenth century Heile Welt depictions of Gotthelf were transposed into the 20th century with little regard for changing political landscape. The seventies and eighties then saw rather more reflected takes on what it meant to be Swiss: films, like for instance Rolf Lyssy's Die Schweizermacher, that explored the arduous process of procuring a Swiss passport, and is thought of today as a break-through in Swiss film history. Today, we look back on three decades of Swiss film since Die Schweizermacher as a site avid and often provocative cultural criticism that has turned the idea of Swissness upside down even as its relentless search for a Swiss identity speaks the language of enduring Heimweh. This class is a split-level class, and will be taught in German with some attention to the peculiarities of Swiss dialects. Film screenings will take place regularly on a weekday evening and must be attended in addition to the regular classes.

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History

HIS 100 Western Civilization I: Ancient and Medieval

This survey course is an introduction to the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of the west from the Neolithic to the voyages of discovery in the sixteenth century. Our knowledge and understanding of the past is contingent and contested. The course explores areas of contestation to give students a better understanding of the forces and events which shaped the ancient and medieval worlds and continue to shape the modern world.

HIS 101 Western Civilization II: Modern

This survey course is an introduction to the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of the west from the scientific revolution to the present. Our knowledge and understanding of the past is contingent and contested. The course explores areas of contestation to give students a better understanding of the forces and events which have shaped the modern world.

HIS 104 Global History I: Traditions, Encounters, and Adaptation from the Stone Age to the 16th Century

This course is an introduction to themes and trends in the political, economic, cultural, and social, history of pre-modern societies in global perspective. It covers the development of civilizations in Eurasia, Africa and the Americas from the Neolithic Revolution to the "Columbian Exchange" with emphasis on the emergence and diffusion of religious and political institutions, the role of the environmental context, as well as the impact of encounters between human societies. Students are introduced to the historiography of empire and global history/globalization, and attention is devoted to the reading and analysis of different categories of primary sources.

HIS 105 Global History II: Globalization, the Emergence of the Modern State, and Coping with Change

This course is an introduction to themes and trends in the political, economic, cultural, and social history of modern societies in global perspective. It covers the development of societies in Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas from the "Columbian Exchange" to the twenty-first century with emphasis on the development of institutions within their changing cultural, political, and environmental context, as well as the impact of encounters between human societies. Students are introduced to the historiography of globalization and of the modern state. Further attention is devoted to the analysis of different categories of primary sources. (It is recommended that HIS 104 be taken prior to HIS 105).

HIS 199 First Year Seminar

Seminar topics change year to year. Please consult the Schedule of Classes for current seminar offerings.

HIS 202T History of Switzerland

Switzerland can be seen as a striking exception to the idea of a modern Western nation state: one of the oldest republics, with four official languages, neutral by tradition with at the same time a strong military tradition, a direct democracy and nevertheless one of the most stable states in the world. Hence, it has convincingly been called a "country of minorities" or just "an exception". This course analyzes the political, economic, social, and cultural development of Switzerland as a coherent and significant part of the history of medieval and modern Europe, with visits to places such as Bern, Basel, Schwyz, St. Gallen, and Zurich. Key themes covered include the founding of the Swiss Confederation in the thirteenth century, the initiation of the Swiss Reformation by Ulrich Zwingli in the sixteenth century, the introduction of the federal government in the nineteenth century, and the present day polemics of immigration and direct democracy. Local day trips to the medieval Ticinese towns of Riva San Vitale and Mendrisio round out the course.

HIS 204 History of Italy from the Renaissance to the Present

Italy in many of its aspects can be considered to be a laboratory of Western modernity. The peninsula had a leading role in Western affairs during Antiquity and the Middle Ages, but this role was lost by the end of the fifteenth century. During the modern age, however, Italy continued to provide a central point of reference in the European mind. This course focuses attention on the cultural, social and political developments in Italian history in their European context since the Renaissance. Themes include the struggles over national identity in the absence of a unified nation state, the differing regions and competing centers, the interplay of culture and politics, and the relation between religion and politics.

HIS 211 The Human in History: Biography and Life Writing

The study of history is about the role of human beings in changing times. Over the last two hundred years the idea of the role of humans in history has developed from the heros perspective of agency to an understanding of the interplay between the individual and the wider environment and society. This course explores how these changing examples have been represented in biographical and autobiographical writings, and what these different perspectives mean for our interpretation of the role of human beings in history. Starting with the autobiography of Benjamin Franklin and excerpts from various biographies of this Founding Father of the United States, this course also serves as an introduction to the history of historiography and life writing in a western context, and enables students to further contextualize their own experience and research. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

HIS 215T Central Europe: An Urban History

This Academic Travel course seeks to explore urban development and urban planning of Central European cities from Antiquity to the Present. The course investigates the specific development of cities in Central Europe, both north and south of the Alps, with an emphasis on the legacies of Roman antiquity, the Christian (and Jewish) legacy of the Middle Ages, the role of princely residences, and of bourgeois middle classes. An important part plays also the various political movements of the 20th century, including the architectural fantasies of National Socialism, and the attempts post-World War II to deal with this legacy in a democratic society. The course asks in which way the interplay of tradition and modernity over time has structured not only the physical shapes of cities, but even the mindsets of the population. The travel component of this course features day trips to the Roman foundation of Como (Italy) and the oldest still standing structure in Switzerland in Riva San Vitale (Ticino), and a major excursion to the three most important cities in Bavaria: Nuremberg, Regensburg, and Munich (Germany).

HIS 235 War, Peace, Diplomacy: A Political History of Modern Europe

This course provides an overview over the history of relations of European states in the Modern age. After a short introduction to the development of state, sovereignty, and diplomacy since the early modern period, the course focuses on how the various European powers negotiated, fought or pacified tensions and crises from the Crimean War (1853-6) onwards, through the period of the two World Wars, up to the building of a new European order post-1945.

HIS 240 History of Modern Germany

This course focuses on the central issues raised in the study of modern German history. The main historical themes and trends of political, economic, social and cultural development are analyzed. Special attention is paid to the role of Bismarck, the Weimar Republic and the Third Reich as the historic legacy of contemporary Germany.

HIS 243 Worlds of Islam

This course is an introduction to the multifaceted civilization of Islam as both a religion and a historical phenomenon. After a survey of the background and context of the emergence of Muhammad as a spiritual leader in the Arabian peninsula, the course analyzes the rapid spread of Islam to Spain in the west and India to the east in less than a hundred years. It follows the divergent paths of the emerging different Islamic cultures in the Arabian and Mediterranean regions, in Persia, India, Turkey and Africa, and it follows also the Muslim diaspora in the Christian West. The guiding question is the relation between "normalcy" and variety as manifest in the tensions between the importance of the holy text of the Qur'an and the impact of interpretation and tradition. The course concludes with a consideration of contemporary Islam, focusing attention on both fundamentalist approaches and open-minded ones that seek a role for Muslims in peaceful relations with the West today. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

HIS 245 Worlds of Judaism

This course is an introduction to the multifaceted civilization of Judaism as both a religion and as a historical phenomenon. After a survey of the background and preconditions of the emergence of the Hebrew bible and of monotheistic culture within the context of the Middle East in antiquity, the course focuses on the cultural mechanisms such as religious law and memory that kept the various Jewish worlds somewhat linked, despite the Diaspora from the time of the Babylonian Captivity, and even more so following the destruction of the Temple of Jerusalem by the Romans in 70 CE. Attention is given to religious, cultural, and social developments that made Judaism survive from antiquity through the middle ages to the present, and also to the different reactions to its respective environments, in areas as diverse as Babylonia in the age of the Talmud, the "Golden Age" of Islamic Spain, or Germany in the Modern era. The course concludes with the rise of a Jewish center in Palestine in the twentieth century, and the ensuing tensions between this center and the persisting diasporas.(This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

HIS 257 Early Modern Europe and the European World c.1500-1800

In a relatively short period from 1500 to 1800, Europe was completely transformed and in turn transformed the world during the first major period of globalization. This course considers the changing economic and social conditions for the majority of Europe's population. It also explores how the religious and intellectual unity of the West was shattered under the weight of new ideas of church reformation and spiritual renewal and later by a revolution which asserted the Rights of Man. It analyzes how modern methods of rationalized administration changed governance, and finally how the new European states built global empires of conquest, confession and commerce.

HIS 260 The Holocaust and Genocide

The course discusses the contexts, causes and developments that enabled what is considered one of the worst atrocities ever committed in human history: the industrialized mass-murder of Jews by Nazi Germany and its collaborators. After an introduction to the major trends in genocide research, the course explores the development of modern anti-Semitism, and discusses the main factors, both long- and short-term, that enabled the radicalization of an ideology into outright murder. By analyzing a wide array of primary sources, the course also examines the motivations of the actors and their collaborators from envisioning a world without Jews to the decision-making on various levels to the murder of women, men, and children. Finally, the course examines the legacy of the Holocaust in legal and cultural terms and from the perspective of historical memory.

HIS 268T History of Modern Japan

Following over two centuries of self imposed isolation, Japan was forcibly opened to the west in the 1850s by America's 'black ships'. Since then it has experienced revolutionary changes as its leaders struggled to align Japan with the prevailing trends of the world system. These efforts have had far reaching and lasting consequences for the Japanese people and for Japan's neighbors. This course examines these changes as Japan struggled to catch up with the western powers, to industrialize, build modern systems of administration, establish itself as an imperial power, and later, to recover from the ravages of war and meet the challenges of economic success and stagnation and the ever present danger of natural disaster. This Academic Travel course includes a period of field-research throughout Japan.

HIS 271 History of Modern France

From absolute monarchy to the Fifth Republic, from the Enlightenment to existentialism, France has been central to European affairs in revolution, war and peace. Paris itself has been called "capital of the nineteenth century" and pacemaker for many aspects of twentieth-century culture. This course analyzes the political, social, and cultural history of modern France with special attention to the tensions between the urban center and the rural periphery, the often violent struggles between tradition and modernization, and the European dimension of its identity and influence from the late-eighteenth century to the present.

HIS 273 History of the United States

This course is an introduction to recent approaches to the political, economic, and cultural history of the United States from the eighteenth to the twenty first century. Its topics include the role of environment and space, as well as the interplay of religion, gender, ethnic relations, and immigration. It also discusses the changing role of the United States in the World from colonial times to the present.

HIS 275T History of Modern Ireland: Union and Dis-union, 1798-1998

Ireland has undergone profound social, economic and political changes over the last two centuries. Its history has been largely defined, for better or worse, by its relationship with its larger neighbor, Britain. This course will critically examine the contours and effects of this often troubled relationship which can largely be defined as the struggle between union and dis-union, that is, either strengthening or severing the link with Britain. Going beyond these constitutional issues it will also examine wider social and cultural changes; the famine and its legacy, the land revolution of the late nineteenth century, emigration, the 'Celtic Tiger' economy and Ireland's delayed sexual revolution.

HIS 295 The Crusades and Crusading in the Middle Ages

This course is intended to give you a solid introduction to the history and historiography of the crusading movement of the Middle Ages. In this class we will examine both the major crusading expeditions as well as the concept of Holy war as it developed prior to and following the calling of the First Crusade by Pope Urban II at the Council of Clermont in 1095. Assigned readings will cover the social and military history of the crusading expeditions as well as the intellectual background to the ideology, but the sources we will be examining also allow us insight into the experience of crusading by the participants, the massacres of Jews by the crusading armies, and the reactions to the crusaders by Byzantine and Muslim populations. Attention will also be given to the problem of defining a crusade and how the crusading era helped to set the stage for later (and indeed modern) relations between the West and the Middle East. By the conclusion of the semester students should have a solid grasp of the principal events, personalities, and texts from the main crusading era (1095-1291).

HIS 296 Faculty Fellows Summer Program

Faculty Fellows Program courses are offered in the Summer sessions. Specific course offerings vary from year to year.

HIS 297 Faculty Fellows Summer Program

Faculty Fellows Program courses are offered in the Summer sessions. Specific course offerings vary from year to year.

HIS 310 The Cold War

The Cold War was many things. It was primarily a global power struggle between the United States of America and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, two Superpowers which divided the world into competing alliances and engaged in proxy wars. It was a tense and often unstable nuclear standoff. It was also an ideological clash between freedom and totalitarianism; between economic equality and exploitation; and between imperialism and anti-colonial nationalism. This course examines these intersecting facets as well as the ways in which the Cold War is interpreted and its profound and continuing impact not only on the principal protagonists but on all of the peoples of the world. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

HIS 325 Human Rights in History

The idea of universal, inalienable rights has become one of the most influential concepts in modern history. Human Rights have become an inspiration to oppressed groups and individuals around the globe, a rallying cry for a global civil society, and also a controversial source of legitimation for political and military interventions. The course asks about the reasons for the stellar rise of the concept of Human Rights from "nonsense on stilts" (Jeremy Bentham) to such a powerful driving force in contemporary politics. Also, it asks whether Human Rights are the result of a specifically European or Western or Christian legacy. Students in this course will discuss some key thinkers from the Enlightenment to the present within their historical contexts, and analyze not only the philosophical and theoretical framework for Human Rights as a factor in history, but also have a closer look into the consequences of Human Rights influenced politics in general. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

HIS 330 East Asia and the Pacific,1904-2012: Empires, Revolutions, and Modernity

In 1905 Japan became the first non-western country to defeat a western power, in this case Russia, in the modern era. This was the culmination of a forty year effort by Japan to resist western domination and also served as a powerful inspiration to the peoples of Asia and to the rise of anti-colonial nationalism in the region. For much of the twentieth century the most populous continent was the scene of much convulsion; war (including cold war), revolution and widespread human suffering. Asia has since transcended these difficulties to become a global economic powerhouse, a process that was heavily influenced by the clash of imperialism and nationalism and by the Cold War, a global polarization that led not just to 'cold' tensions but also to 'hot' conflicts. The issues we will look at include the rise, fall and rise of Japan, anti-colonial nationalism, wars in Asia including in Korea and Vietnam, and the emergence of China as a world power. As well as conflict and high politics, we will be exploring how various ideologies affected society. In pursuit of development and prosperity for their people, governments across Asia transformed daily life out of all recognition, for better or for worse.

HIS 351 Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Europe and the Middle East

This course undertakes an in-depth discussion of the origins and development of nationalism as an ideology, as a political movement, and as a source of internal and international conflict in Europe. Following an introduction to important approaches in the theory of nationalism, special attention is devoted to the periods of the Napoleonic Wars, the First World War and its impact, and the period after the end of the Cold War in 1989.

HIS 355 The World and the West in the Long 19th Century

The world today has been shaped to a large extent by Europe and America in the long nineteenth century between the Enlightenment and the First World War. During this period dramatic changes in social, economic, political and cultural ideas and institutions were related to changes in how people in the West conceptualized the world around them. Although Europeans and Americans exerted global influence through industrialization and imperialism, in turn they were influenced by people beyond the West from Africa to the Far East. Thus globalization is not a recent phenomenon. With emphasis on Christopher Bayly's recent book The Birth of the Modern World, 1780-1914: Global Connections and Comparisons, among other works, this course will focus on major themes in the study of modernity such as political ideologies and the roles of science and religion as related to the development of the idea of "Europe" or "the West" with special reference to the British colonies, Egypt, the Ottoman Empire, and Japan. It is intended to provide not only a broad view of a crucial period in modern history but also a functional knowledge of themes and concepts necessary for understanding the contemporary world. Students read primary as well as secondary sources, and attention is devoted to methodological considerations and recent trends in scholarship.

HIS 357 Weimar Germany: Crisis or Crucible of Modernity?

The period in Germany history between 1918 and 1933, commonly referred to as Weimar Germany, can be seen in many contradictory ways: as an era sandwiched between two authoritarian regimes as well as as the countrys first strong republic; this democracy kept struggling constantly with severe and sometimes violent attacks from the political extremes (and sometimes even its neighbors), and yet displayed remarkable endurance. As such, the Weimar Republic is a powerful example for the possibilities and limits of modern democracy, and for the interplay between politics and culture in the modern world. Starting with a discussion of different concepts of modernities, this interdisciplinary seminar will provide a detailed examination of the political, cultural, social and economical developments of the 1920s and early 1930s, and analyze their representation in the arts, in the contemporary media, and in architecture.

HIS 358 Global Britishness

The concept of 'Global Britishness' began as loyalty to the colonial motherland on the part of Britain's white settler colonies (Canada, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand). This was transformed after the Second World War into a set of uneasy nationalisms by the 1970s. In recent years these ex-colonies have witnessed a re-identification with earlier concepts of Britishness (royal visits, war commemoration) at a time when the very concept of Britishness is perceived to be under threat from Scottish devolution (and possible independence) and the European Union. 'Global Britishness' presents a fascinating array of competing and intersecting identities across global, imperial and national lines. Students will gain a greater understanding and awareness of; - the processes and agencies of Britain's imperial decline, - the reactions to this among the various white settler colonies - the differences and similarities between these reactions; - the practices of cultural and transnational history - contemporary legacies of the British Empire in the settler colonial world. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

HIS 370 Special Topics in History

Special topics in History vary each semester. Course description and pre-requisites are specified in the session course description.

HIS 410 The Cold War (Capstone)

Students in their Senior year who wish to graduate with a Major in History (stand alone or combined) need to take this capstone version of HIS 310 (see course description). Students in HIS 410 attend all meetings of HIS 310 and are responsible for additional and more in-depth work including an oral presentation and seminars with the instructor. This additional work is geared towards preparing the student for the successful completion of their Senior Thesis. (Students who have already earned credit for HIS 310 or HIS 210 may not enroll and earn credit for HIS 410.)

HIS 430 East Asia and the Pacific

Students in their Senior year who wish to graduate with a Major in History (stand alone or combined) take this capstone version of HIS 330 (see course description). Students in HIS 430 attend all meetings of HIS 330 and are responsible for additional and more in-depth work including an oral presentation and seminars with the instructor. This additional work is geared towards preparing the student for the successful completion of the Senior Thesis. (Students who have already earned credit for HIS 330 may not enroll and earn credit for HIS 430.)

HIS 451 Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict in Europe and the Middle East

Students in their Senior year who wish to graduate with a major in History (stand alone or combined) need to take this capstone version of HIS 351 (see course description). Students in HIS 451 attend all meetings of HIS 351 and are responsible for additional and more in-depth work, to include an oral presentation and tutorials with the instructor. The additional work and the tutorials are geared towards preparing the student for the successful completion of their Senior Thesis. Students who have earned credit for HIS 351 in a previous year may not enroll and earn credit for HIS 451.

HIS 455 The World and the West in the Long 19th Century (Capstone)

Students in their Senior year who wish to graduate with a Major in History (stand alone or combined) need to take this capstone version of HIS 355 (see course description). Students in HIS 455 attend all meetings of HIS 355 and are responsible for additional and more in-depth work, to include an oral presentation and tutorials with the instructor. The additional work and the tutorials are geared towards preparing the student for the successful completion of their Senior Thesis. Students who have earned credit for HIS 355 in a previous year may not enroll and earn credit for HIS 455.

HIS 499 History Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis proposals are to be coordinated with the Department Chair.

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Italian Studies

IS 100T The Making of an Eternal City: Rome

The conqueror and heiress of diverse civilizations extending from Spain and Portugal to Syria, from Egypt to Central and Northern Europe, ancient Rome served for nearly three centuries as the capital of an extremely eclectic empire that hosted and absorbed a variety of foreign cults, languages and customs, and that found inspiration in Greek culture. Christian Rome saw to the survival of the ancient Greco-Roman civilizations, so it is no coincidence that Renaissance Rome should have arisen on the impulse of a number of popes deeply imbued in the art and culture of classical Greece and Rome. The new Renaissance Rome attracted travelers from all over Europe, contributing to form a classical style that took new forms well into Mussolinis time. In this course, students will read excerpts from ancient texts that illustrate the history and culture of ancient Greece and Rome in a broad sense, such as Pliny the Elders Natural History and Plutarchs Parallel Lives, and they will learn to define archaic, classical, Hellenistic and post-classical art(s) following patterns of discontinuity and continuity up to the Renaissance period. Particular attention will be devoted to the myth of Rome. This course will help students make the connection between medieval pilgrimages, the Grand Tour and Franklins Academic Travel experience. In addition to time spent in Rome, course will include visits to ancient and modern cities, including Pompeii and Herculaneum, as well as ancient and modern monuments, churches and museums. Students who have a background in Italian are encouraged to do course readings and written work in the original language.

IS 120T Italian Tales of Courtship, Beauty, and Power

The number and variety of towns, cities, villages and castles stunned travelers to Italy in the early Middle Ages. This phenomenon became even more distinctive with the passing of time. During the Renaissance, the Italian city-states were compressed into wider, regional domains which were ruled by either a local family or a foreign state, and, much to Machiavellis regret, republicanism gave way to what we now know as the court civilization. Though the seats of intrinsically tyrannical powers, Italian courts and their patrons were successful in allying themselves with the most powerful of them all: the power of culture and art. In return, they were transformed into ideal, timeless places whose death was meant to be regretted. Even today, Italy retains her fairy-land beauty, and her monuments (public or private, urban, suburban or rural) still possess their unique power of inspiration notwithstanding the touristic commercialization. The course examines a number of authors and artists who took part in the shaping of both the communal and court values that formed Italys manifold cultural identities. Additionally, the course includes fairy-tales from the Italian folkloric tradition, where princes and princesses provide yet another perspective of Italys many kingdoms. The travel itinerary will include visits to Ravenna, Arezzo and Florence, Urbino, Padua, Vicenza and Mantua.

IS 150T Contemporary Italy: Aspects of Language and Culture

This course introduces students to the land and the people of Italy and the Italian-speaking world, with a focus on contemporary aspects of language and culture. In particular, students will examine concepts from the fields of intercultural communication and the sociology of globalization, as well the representation of northern Italian culture by Italian and expatriate authors and filmmakers. This course includes a travel component to northern Italy where students will study firsthand related phenomena such as the birth of the Slow Food movement, migration, regionalism and linguistic diversity in contexts of multiculturalism and globalization.

IS 199 First Year Seminar

First Year Seminar topics vary from year to year. Please see the current course offerings for more information

IS 271T Shakespeare and Italy

This course focuses on Shakespeares Italian plays and on the relation between Shakespeare and his beloved Italy. Did Shakespeare visit Italy or was his knowledge of Italy entirely from second-hand sources? At a deeper level of analysis, what was Italy for Shakespeare and what where did the Italian sources for his Italian plays originate? Did Shakespeare perhaps know Italian? How does his language reflect Italian culture? These are some of the questions that this course aims to answer in order to illuminate this iconic author from an Italian perspective. Beginning with an introduction to Humanism and the Renaissance from a broad interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective, students will then focus on a selection of Shakespeares Italian plays. The second part of the semester will be devoted to the sonnets and their relationship to works by Dante, Petrarch and Giovanni Boccaccio. Following Richard P. Roes classic The Shakespeare Guide to Italy, during Academic Travel students will visit the cities forming the bulk of Shakespeares Italy: Naples, Messina and Syracuse in Sicily, and Venice.

IS 274 Italian and Italian-American Cinema

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the major accomplishments of Italian cinema from "neorealism" through the "commedia all'italiana" to the present. Emphasis is placed on film as an artistic, aesthetic and theoretical medium for an exploration and interpretation of issues related to contemporary life. Some of Italy's major film directors will be considered, such as Rossellini, De Sica, Visconti, Antonioni, the Taviani brothers, Scola. Particular attention is dedicated to the films of Fellini. A module dedicated to Italian-American cinema (Capra, Scorsese, Coppola, Tarantino) offers a means for comparative study of two related but contrasting traditions in filmmaking. (Offered in Alternate Years)

IS 275 Modern Italian Poetry

While focusing on the twentieth century and its various -isms (Futurism, Decadentism, Crepuscularism, Hermeticism, Neorealism), this course also offers a broader, foundational history of Italian poetry from the poets of the scuola siciliana to Dante and Petrarch;surveying major developments in Italian poetry since the Renaissance. Among the authors we will be looking at will be Giuseppe Ungaretti, Gabriele D'Annunzio, Salvatore Quasimodo, Eugenio Montale, Maria Luisa Spaziani, Cesare Pavese, Elio Vittorini, Dino Campana, Mario Luzi, Lalla Romano, Amelia Rosselli, Andrea Zanzotto. The course will be conducted entirely in English.

IS 276 The Italian Short Story

This course, conducted entirely in English, is distinguished by a creative writing component that runs parallel to a topical exploration of the history of the Italian short story, from the Middle Ages to the present. While analyzing the transformation of the short story throughout the centuries, students will use their creative writing as a means to travel, figuratively, into foreign landscapes; to experiment, literally, with foreign concepts and forms. Student travelers will discover key questions in Italian cultural history such as the Italian search for a common linguistic identity or the struggle for political unification. They will reflect on these questions as informed thinkers and interact with Italian culture as experimental authors. Special attention will be paid to thematic as well as formal issues in the stories of writers such as Giovanni Boccaccio, Niccol Machiavelli, Giovanni Verga, Luigi Pirandello, Matilde Serao, Alberto Moravia, Natalia Ginzburg, and Italo Calvino. Local Swiss writers, and related questions of Ticinese identity, may also be introduced.

IS 276T The Italian Short Story: Pianura Padana

This course, conducted in English, is distinguished by a creative writing component that runs parallel to a topical exploration of the history of the Italian short story, from the Middle Ages to the present. While analyzing the transformation of the short story throughout the centuries, students will use their creative writing as a means to travel, figuratively, into foreign landscapes; to experiment, literally, with foreign concepts and forms. Student travelers will discover key questions in Italian cultural history such as the Italian search for a common linguistic identity or the struggle for political unification. They will reflect on these questions as informed thinkers and interact with Italian culture as experimental authors. Special attention will be paid to thematic as well as formal issues in the stories of writers such as Giovanni Boccaccio, Niccol Machiavelli, Giovanni Verga, Luigi Pirandello, Matilde Serao, Alberto Moravia, Natalia Ginzburg, and Italo Calvino. For the travel segment, the class will visit Pianura Padana (Padua, Verona, Venice, Treviso) and Tuscany (Florence and Certaldo).

IS 277 The Italian Novel: Redefining the Canon

The course explores the expression of the male and female narrative "I" against the greater context of the historical development of the Italian novel, with an emphasis on the late 19th and 20th centuries. As the traditional Italian hero finds his narrative trajectory from Modernity into the Postmodern, the Italian heroine appears to be engaged in the pursuit of Other agendas. The ongoing affirmation of a feminine alternative to the insistently male-dominated Italian canon will be studied via readings from the following novels: Giovanni Verga's The House by the Medlar Tree and Italo Svevo's Confessions of Zeno, Luigi Pirandello's, The Late Mattia Pascal, Sibilla Aleramo's A Woman, Grazia Deledda's Cosima, Natlia Ginsburg Family Sayings, Dacia Maraini's The Silent Duchess, Anna Banti's Artemisia. The course will be conducted entirely in English.

IS 278 Italian Genre Crossings and Hybridity

This course, conducted in English, offers an innovative look at Italian filmmakers, novelists, journalists, television actors, philosophers, photographers, translators, singers, even caricaturists, who refused to be defined by one category of artistry and, instead, viewed work across genres and media as an important means to amplifying the scope and range of their unique message, while commonly embracing the value of cultural cross-fertilization and hybridity. Franca Rame and Dario Fo, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Federico Fellini, Dacia Maraini, Umberto Eco, Ferzan Ozpetek: these are just a few of the Italian cultural figures to whom students will be introduced. There is a significant creative writing component to this class which asks students to venture into multimedia assignments (merging digital photography with fiction writing, for example; or exploring the concept of liminality in both music and the prose poem).

IS 279 Italian Myths and Counter-Myths of America

The stories told in the films and novels to be studied in this course were written by two generations of Italians typically associated in literary history with what has been called the mito americano, or American myth. Defining and contextualizing this myth will be among our first objectives. In what ways has the New World positively impacted Old World culture and, conversely, what are some of the negative perceptions of America (or apocalyptic anxieties) represented by Italian writers and filmmakers? Authors to be studied (in translation) may include Mario Soldati, Ignazio Silone, Beppe Fenoglio, Eugenio Montale, Italo Calvino, Curzio Malaparte, Elio Vittorini, Cesare Pavese, Umberto Eco, Alberto Moravia, Giorgio Bassani. Among the chief learning goals in this course is to provide students with the opportunity to consider some of the common metaphorical and allegorical terms in which America has been positively and negatively mythified through the lens of Italian film, poetry, and fiction. Parallel to questions of national myths, the course also reflects on how and where Italian writers and filmmakers position themselves at the intersection of political ideology and creative engagement, personal identity construction and questions of social justice.

IS 280T Italian Cinema on Location: Projections of the Eternal City in Italian Film and Cultural Studies

This course provides an introduction to classic cinematic portrayals of the city of Rome and its inhabitants, with an emphasis on 20th-century authors and filmmakers. Landmark films, such as Roberto Rossellini's "Open City" and Federico Fellini's "La Dolce Vita" will be contextualized both historically and thematically. Subsequently, students will begin crafting their own short film design; to be pitched in the form of a multi-media presentation prior to travel. Filming and production will follow in Rome, under the guidance and supervision of the professor. During the final weeks of the semester, class time will be devoted to close the discussion of contemporary readings from Italian Cultural Studies and, parallel to this, editing and completion of the student's semester-long short film project. Students enrolling in this course should have basic knowledge of how to create and edit short films using their own digital video devices. Students should be familiar with the program Final Cut (or similar editing program).

IS 497 Senior Seminar in Italian Studies

The Senior Seminar is the capstone course for the Italian Studies major at Franklin University. The seminar will create a forum for the research and presentation of an original senior project in English or Italian. The capstone seminar will not only seek to bring together work done in other courses in the Italian Studies major, but will offer the chance to reflect on and integrate academic travel courses into the student's final project. Possible final projects may take various forms, including: a thesis, a performance, a video essay, or a portfolio of creative work. Projects will be designed and completed in consultation with the instructor and the student's major advisor.

IS 498 Internship in Italian Studies

Internship experience related to a student's Italian Studies major to be coordinated with the student's Academic Advisor, and the Department Chair.

IS 499 Thesis in Italian Studies

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ITA 100 Introductory Italian, Part I

This course is designed for students who do not have any knowledge of the Italian language. The course provides an introduction to the essentials of Italian grammar, vocabulary, and culture. The acquisition of aural/oral communication skills will be stressed and, as such, the predominant language of instruction will be Italian. By the end of the course students will achieve proficiency at the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Students are expected to acquire the basic knowledge of the written and spoken structures. Students are expected to read and comprehend short passages in Italian and to draft simple compositions / dialogues. Whenever possible, the written assignments will be designed to foster practical communication skills and encourage efforts towards increased student integration in the local Italian-speaking community.

ITA 101 Introductory Italian, Part II

This course is designed for students who have completed one semester of Italian language study. The course provides an introduction to the essentials of Italian grammar, vocabulary, and culture. The acquisition of aural/oral communication skills will be stressed and, as such, the predominant language of instruction will be Italian. By the end of the course students will achieve proficiency at the A2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Students will be expected to be proficient in the written and spoken usage of basic linguistic structures. Students will be expected to read and comprehend short passages in Italian and to draft simple compositions / dialogues. Whenever possible, the written assignments will be designed to foster practical communication skills and encourage efforts towards increased student integration in the local Italian-speaking community.

ITA 200 Intermediate Italian, Part I

This course is designed for students who have completed two semesters of Italian language study. The course provides a review and expansion of command of Italian grammar, vocabulary, and culture. The acquisition of aural/oral communication skills will be stressed and, as such, the predominant language of instruction will be Italian. By the end of the course students will achieve proficiency at the B1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Students will be expected to be proficient in the written and spoken usage of intermediate linguistic structures. Students will be expected to deal with most situations likely to arise in the areas where the language is spoken. They will be able to: a) produce simple connected texts on topics, which are familiar or of personal interest; b) describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes and ambitions; and c) briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans. Whenever possible, the written assignments will be designed to foster practical communication skills and encourage efforts towards increased student integration in the local Italian-speaking community.

ITA 201 Intermediate Italian, Part II

This course is designed for students who have completed three semesters of Italian lan-guage study. The course provides a review and expansion of command of Italian grammar, vocabulary, and culture. The acquisition of aural/oral communication skills will be stressed and, as such, the predominant language of instruction will be Italian. By the end of the course students will achieve proficiency at the B2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Students will be expected to be proficient in the written and spoken usage of intermediate linguistic structures. Students will be able to interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible without strain for either party. They will be able to: a) understand the main ideas of complex texts on both concrete and abstract topics, in-cluding technical discussions in his/her field of specialisation; b) produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options. Whenever possible, the written assignments will be designed to foster practical communication skills and encourage efforts towards increased student integration in the local Italian-speaking community.

ITA 300 Advanced Italian, Part I

For students who have completed at least two years of college-level language studies or the equivalent. This course offers cultural readings from a variety of sources, including some literary pieces, as well as magazine and newspaper articles reflecting the contemporary scene in the countries where the language is spoken. Vocabulary expansion and development of techniques of expression are accomplished through oral and written exercises.

ITA 301 Advanced Italian, Part II

For students who have completed at least two years of college-level language studies or the equivalent. This course offers cultural readings from a variety of sources, including some literary pieces, as well as magazine and newspaper articles reflecting the contemporary scene in the countries where the language is spoken. Vocabulary expansion and development of techniques of expression are accomplished through oral and written exercises.

ITA 302 Advanced Italian Conversation

This course uses techniques of oral expression to develop greater conversational fluency and accuracy. Conversational practice is based on topics in the culture and contemporary civilization related to the language.

ITA 350 Topics in Italian Cultural Studies

The land and the people of Italy and the Italian-speaking world: historical, social and cultural evolution; major developments in the arts (literature, music, opera, figurative arts, theater, cinema,; television, digital cultures, and new technologies) as these relate to enduring questions related to linguistic and political unity, immigration and emigration, race, class, gender and sexuality. Aspects of contemporary Italy are also covered

ITA 353 Italian Theater Workshop

This course introduces the advanced Italian student to a wide array of Italian writers, cultural theorists, and filmmakers through the cultivation of performance skills, exercises in improvisation, acting games, textual analysis, peer critiques, and group discussion. Conceived as a student-centered workshop, the main objective of the course is to experiment creatively, and across literary genres, with the task of making Italian culture come alive on stage. The pronunciation and fluency of the advanced Italian language student is expected to benefit greatly from the memorization, dramatization, and rehearsal of Italian-language scenes and monologues. Creative writing assignments, requiring different methods of stage adaptation, will invite students to "play with" the Italian language as they "play out" their interpretations in the form of weekly performances. Students who sign up for this course need not have prior theater experience, but must be motivated to collaborate in a dynamic workshop setting and willing to interact both creatively and intellectually with a wide variety of texts ranging from the essays of Umberto Eco to the screenplays of Federico Fellini to the poetry of Eugenio Montale and Alda Merini.

ITA 370 Readings in Italian Literature

Special topics course in Italian Literature; topics vary by semester.

ITA 373 Italian Film and Society

Aspects of political, social and cultural history of twentieth century Italy are studied through documentaries and some of the major accomplishments of Italian cinema. Some novels adapted into film are also examined. Most of the films are in Italian (some with English subtitles).

ITA 374 Italian Cinema

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the major accomplishments of Italian cinema from "neorealism" through the "commedia all'italiana" to the present. Emphasis is placed on film as an artistic, aesthetic and theoretical medium for an exploration and interpretation of issues related to contemporary life. Some of Italy's major film directors will be considered, such as Rossellini, De Sica, Visconti, Antonioni, the Taviani brothers, Scola. Particular attention is dedicated to the films of Fellini.

ITA 375 Italian Film Adaptation: From the Page to the Screen

The course introduces the student to the development of Italian cinema through close study of the relationship between Italian literature and film adaptation. The selected books and films will offer a unique opportunity to analyze and discuss crucial issues related to the historical, political, and cultural evolution of Italy from its Unification to the present. Among the adaptations we will be looking at will be: Antonio Fogazzaro's Malombra as interpreted by Carmine Gallone (1917) and Mario Soldati (1942), Luchino Visconti's 1963 rendering of Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa's The Leopard, Vittorio De Sica's 1970 adaptation of Giorgio Bassani's The Garden of the Finzi-Contini, Alberto Moravia's The Conformist, as adapted by Bernardo Bertolucci (1970), Giovanni Boccaccio's Decameron, adapted by Pier Paolo Pasolini (1971).

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Literature

LIT 199 First Year Seminar

Seminar topics change year to year. Please consult the Schedule of Classes for current seminar offerings.

LIT 201 Deception

Deception, in all its forms, including eavesdropping, adultery, cheating, and trickery, functions as a narrative motor in the nineteenth- and twentieth-century novel and film. This class examines this notion of deception in literary and visual cultures. In particular, this class will focus on the strategies of narrative structures in the European novel and film from 1840s through the late twentieth century. Students will consider eavesdropping, lying, adultery, cheating, gender switching, and their narrative consequences relating to gender and class through the course of the semester. European Realism, with its focus on the every-day and the darker side, signals a shift away from the Romantic and will introduce the study of deception in a cross-cultural context.

LIT 221T Bloomsbury Britain: Art, Craft, Culture

The primary thematic focus of this course is the Bloomsbury Group, a loose network of writers, artists, and intellectuals (including Virginia Woolf, E. M. Forster, John Maynard Keynes, and Roger Fry) who gathered in the squares of the Bloomsbury area of London during the first decades of the twentieth century. The course considers the exciting and creative possibilities of living in this period of dramatic social and cultural change. It pays particular attention to the possibilities for artistic creation at a time when art was not ethereal but rather a concrete and vibrant part of everyday life. Stu-dents will visit a variety of locations associated with the Bloomsbury Group: the homes that became laboratories for artistic production; public spaces of popular, commercial, and high art such as cinemas, galleries, and bookshops; as well as muse-ums and archives. In addition to London, the travel will take students to other locations in southern England, including Brighton, Lewes, and Charleston.

LIT 236T Prague on the Page: Alienation and Absurdity

The literature of Prague lies in the city's complex web of identities, a web created by social upheaval through the ages. Beginning with sixteenth-century tales of the Golem, the clay figure animated by Rabbi Loew to protect the city's Jewish community, students will investigate how Prague's writers have responded to the politics of their times by embracing the surreal and the ambiguous. In particular, this class will look at how these authors have found inspiration in the city itself. Reading includes Franz Kafka's evocation of the early twentieth-century city and a selection of works by more recent writers such as Weil, Kundera, and Hakl. Studying the way these writers repeatedly draw on each other through the idea of the city as a text, students will visit their haunts in Prague and its surroundings, and map their works onto the city's landscape and onto its history, with the surreal Kafka museum as a starting point.

LIT 242 Contemporary African Literature

This course is a study of fiction, drama, and poetry from Africa. The course will focus on contemporary literature and its main concern will be the work of the postcolonial African writer. The continent of Africa includes diverse peoples, cultures, languages, customs, economic circumstances, and responses to colonialism. With such diversity comes a broad wealth of literary production. Thus students will read texts from various countries and from different cultural or gender perspectives. Although the subject of study is literature, the class will adopt an interdisciplinary approach, understanding literary works as products of cultural, historical, social, and political circumstances. Students understanding of each text will be complemented by a study of its context. Throughout the semester, the class will explore such themes as the relation of English-language writing to indigenous languages, to orality, and to audience, as well as images of pre-colonial Africa, and the issues of creating art in a world of suffering and of de-colonising the narrative of history. At the end of the term, students will be expected to have gained insight into contemporary African literary tradition and will have been introduced to literary criticism of African literature.

LIT 243 On Being Human

This course examines what it means to "be human" and how humanity, or its opposite, has been depicted in literature and film. Through reading a broad selection of texts, from the classics to the present day, students will explore such issues as: the relationship between self and other; madness; the borders between human and monster, human and animal, and human and machine. The course will cover religious, philosophical, scientific, and cultural conceptions of human character and purpose. Students will read a broad variety of works that unsettle the boundaries of the self, that draw attention to those groups that have been excluded from the category of the human, and that ask us to engage with what Aristotle called, "being qua being" or, the study of what it is to be. The course reading list may include such works as: Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Janice Galloway's The Trick is to Keep Breathing, Guillermo del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth, Andrew Currie's Fido, Richard Wright's The Invisible Man, and Jeanette Winterson's Sexing the Cherry.

LIT 253 Caribbean Literature

This multi-cultural course focuses on contemporary Caribbean writers. There will be excursions into Caribbean history, the origins of the Caribbean people, Caribbeanness, Caribbean literary criticism (Glissant), gender roles in the Caribbean, etc. The course understands the Caribbean in a very large sense and will accentuate connections to North America, Colombia, and Venezuela. Authors likely to be included: Maryse Cond , Simone Schwartz-Bart, Alejo Carpentier, Jacques Roumain, Edwidge Danticat, Gabriel Garca M rquez, J.S. Alexis,et. al.

LIT 254 Introduction to Postcolonial Literatures and Theories

This course is designed as an introduction to the field of postcolonial studies. Readings will familiarise students with a diversity of world literature and grant an understanding of key debates in postcolonial studies. As postcolonialism is not a unified field of study, the course engages with different theoretical understandings of the term and queries what it even means to be postcolonial. When exactly does the postcolonial begin? What are the implications of using such a broad umbrella term to designate writings from around the world? Students will explore depictions of the colonial encounter and decolonisation, question the links between colonialism and globalisation, and examine constructions of East and West, Global North and Global South. Central to the course will be the themes of: power and violence; economics and class; land and nation; authenticity and development; gender and sexuality; history and memory; the politics of literature; and the politics of print culture. Students will read a diverse and broad historical selection of texts from a variety of geographical locations including, India, Kenya, New Zealand, South Africa, Zimbabwe, and Jamaica. Literary texts will be paired with theoretical readings from such critics as Kwame Anthony Appiah, Ann McLintock, Benita Parry, Franz Fanon, and Edward Said. Although the main focus of study is literature, the course will adopt an interdisciplinary approach, understanding literary works as products of cultural, historical, social, and political circumstances. Throughout the course, students will explore how colonial power has shapedand continues to shapethe world in which we live. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

LIT 255T Scotland, Story and Song

For such a small nation, Scotland is certainly a very noisy one. From traditional Mouth Music, to Gaelic folk tales, to the Bay City Rollers, The Proclaimers, and indie-pop groups such as Belle and Sebastian and Django Django, Scotland has a long and rich culture of music. This travel course places Scotlands rich musical heritage in the broader context of storytelling in all its forms and genres, including film, fiction, and poetry. Students will travel from Edinburgh on the east coast to Glasgow on the west, and will also visit the Highlands and Islands to study the vibrant folk music culture there. Scottish music will be used as an entrance point to the countrys culture and history. As students close read (and close listen) a variety of works, they will investigate the ways in which these works buy into, help to build, or struggle against particular mythologies of Scottishness. The course will also explore the links between storytelling and nationalism, oral and written tradition, popular and high culture. While most attention will be paid to works produced in Scotland, the course will also take into account externally produced images of Scotland and the Scottish (for example, the abiding popularity of Braveheart or The Simpsons Groundskeeper Willie). Finally, the course will consider how Scottish music and literature has been marketed and produced in such venues as university departments of Scottish or Celtic Studies, record labels such as Postcard Records, and publishers such as Cannongate Press.

LIT 256 Britain in Fragments

In this course, students will read a broad selection of British Literature, from the post-war period to the present day. While the literature of the early twentieth century is often characterized as international in nature, in the post-war era and during the epoch of decolonization, British literature takes an apparent inward turn, becoming increasingly interested in the nature and definition of Britishness. Yet, the literature from this period is not necessarily insular or parochial, but rather depicts the emergence of a complex and contested national identity as the British archipelago developed from within its own borders to become a more and more culturally diverse territory. During the course, students will examine how regional identities conflict or overlap with national identity considering, for example, the North/South divide and urban/rural divisions; will study the rise of various competing nationalisms within the bounds of the archipelago, including Scottish nationalism; and will explore the growing impact of diverse immigrant communities on the national character. The course examines British literature and culture not as a homogenous whole but as a varied and sometimes contentious conglomeration. Through reading a variety of poetry, prose, and drama, students will explore what characterizes contemporary Britain and what the status and role of literary culture is today. They will develop an understanding of the current state of British literary production as well as the relation between the nation state and the state of fiction. Reading list may include works by: Julian Barnes, Seamus Heaney, Sam Selvon, Ali Smith, Zadie Smith, and Irvine Welsh.

LIT 263 Contemporary Literature from South Asia

South Asia boasts a rich and diverse cultural history. It encompasses some of the world's oldest civilisations, is home to many of the world's major religions, and has produced literature-in various forms and many different languages-for centuries. This course is limited to a study of works written in English during the twentieth century. Despite the fact that English-language literature is only produced (and read) by a minority in South Asia, it has gained a reputation as some of the best, most innovative writing in the world. The course take as its subject English-language authors from across the subcontinent. These authors, who come from disparate geographical regions and religious backgrounds and who speak various mother tongues, illustrate the multiplicity of the region. Students will explore the role that literature has played in imagining the creation of modern nation states and remembering traditional communities. They will consider texts in the contexts of their times, taking into account influential historical events such as the independence movements, partition of India, and creation of Pakistan and Bangladesh, and social issues such as caste and the effects of colonialism.

LIT 295 Faculty Fellows Summer Program

Faculty Fellows Program courses are offered in the Summer sessions. Specific course offerings vary from year to year.

LIT 297 Faculty Fellows Summer Program

Faculty Fellows Program courses are offered in the Summer sessions. Specific course offerings vary from year to year.

LIT 300 Modernism/Modernity: "Making It New"?

This course explores the meanings of "Modernism," the artistic tendency which sprang up in a profusion of forms in the first half of the twentieth century. This was a time of sweeping social change and radical innovation in literature. As students ask, "what is modernism?" they will engage with the contingencies, complexities, and contradictions of modern literature, and acknowledge the sheer diversity of the literary responses to modern times. Students will read works from a variety of modernist movements, and consider the relationship between literary modernism and developments in music and the visual arts. They will study works by such writers as Mulk Raj Anand, Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, Evelyn Waugh, and Nella Larsen. As modern literature often broke with or transformed traditional concepts of literary realism, some of the course work will be challenging; it will ask students to pay close attention to narrative innovations such as stream of consciousness, irony, and multiple point of view. The course will consider various issues, including: emerging psychological theories, responses to imperialism, technological and scientific advances, the city, attitudes towards history, concepts of self and other, and changing relations between genders, cultures, and races.

LIT 305 Home

How do we define home? What does it mean to feel or make one's self at home? Is a home a house, a place, or, to use another clich, is home "where the heart is"? In this course, students will examine different conceptions of home in a variety of fictional works. The course will look at constructions of home as an architectural, domestic, and often gendered space. It will also ask students to think about what it means to define home more broadly as, for example, a homeland or native tongue, and, in so doing, consider how modern immigration and the processes of globalisation have changed our relationship to our homes. Throughout the course readings will invite us to reflect upon the links between home and belonging. Finally, as students read about homes that are on the move (caravans, nomads, etc.) or otherwise in flux, they will rethink the binary opposition between the home and the journey. Works read include: Jean Rhys's Voyage in the Dark, Evelyn Waugh's A Handful of Dust, Henry James's The Spoils of Poynton, and Amitav Ghosh's The Shadow Lines.

LIT 320 Elective Ties: Love, Friendship, Community

E. M. Forster famously said, "if I had to choose between betraying my country and betraying my friend, I hope I should have the guts to betray my country." His words suggest that, in thinking about the communities that we live within, we might distinguish between those that we are born into and those that we form by choice. Throughout the semester this course will consider both specific literary representations of chosen or "elective" ties and their broader cultural significance. The course is interested in examples of what can happen when elective ties clash with other concepts of community. Students will thus consider various philosophies of and models for friendship, including comradeship, brother/sisterhood, and loyalty. They will look not only at positive examples of elective ties but also at examples of potentially dangerous or destructive ties, such as bullying. Because one significant aspect of elective ties is the way in which they cross over national, cultural, and linguistic borders, the works studied will also cross these borders. Students will engage with a broad range of critical texts, novels and films. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

LIT 345 Laughter, Literature, and Culture

This course considers why we laugh and what we laugh at. In many ways, it is easier to explain tragedy than it is to understand comedy and, indeed, laughter is often neglected in literary criticism that concentrates on so-called high culture. Moreover, if we examine humor too closely then we risk ruining, or at least losing sight of, the joke. Nonetheless, the course offers an investigation into the literary and cultural functions of laughter. Laughter is sometimes warm, but can also be dark, aggressive, or even cruel. Socrates even argued that comedy and tragedy are in fact two versions of the same thing. Laughter is culturally, ethnically, and gender specific, and jokes are notoriously hard to translate or explain across such borders. Throughout this course, students will explore different subgenres of comedy, from wit and satire, to slapstick and farce; they will read a broad range of texts from novels and poems to cartoons, films, and stand-up comedy. Primary readings will be complemented by a range of critical material, including work by Freud, Bergson, and Bakhtin. By the end of the course, students will gain a fuller understanding of the psychological and cultural complexity of laughter as well as the diverse representations of comedy in literature without, hopefully, losing their own senses of humor.

LIT 353 Advanced Studies in Postcolonial Literatures

This course considers a special topic in postcolonial studies. At different times, the course may focus on a particular region, writer, or theme, such as, for example, litera-ture from post-apartheid South Africa, depictions of the immigrant experience, or Car-ibbean poetry.

LIT 370 Topics in Literature

Topics in Literature are advanced courses on specific topics not normally offered and vary each semester. They may require additional pre-requisites or permission of the instructor. Course description and pre-requisites are specified in the session course description.

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Mathematics

MAT 102 Intermediate Algebra

This course reviews basic concepts and attempts to enhance competency in problem solving. Topics include linear equations and inequalities, polynomials, factoring, exponents and radicals, fractional expressions and equations, and quadratic equations. (0 Credit)

MAT 103 College Algebra

The first part of this course reviews the basic concepts of algebra, real numbers, first-degree equations and inequalities, rational expressions, exponents and radicals, and polynomials, systems of equations and inequalities. The second part strongly emphasizes graphs and functions. The most important functions for applications are introduced, such as linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, and rational functions.

MAT 104 Mathematics of Inequality

Among the central questions of every society are questions about poverty and wealth, and the unequal distribution of goods, income, wealth, or resources. This courses ana-lyzes inequity by mathematical methods. Based on real data collected throughout the course, students construct measures of inequity, like Lorenz curve, Gini index and others. Students will investigate what effect certain policies, like taxes or even mar-riage patterns, have on these measures, and also try to answer the question of whether inequity is increasing or decreasing within different nations and worldwide. Students will also critically discuss literature and opinions on these inequality trends, and may have a glimpse on the recent modeling of inequality from "econophysics". The basics of Excel will also be taught in this class, since Excel will be used heavily for analysis and modeling. (Not open to students who have completed MAT 199).

MAT 107 Ideas in Mathematics

This course discusses some of the fundamental and successful ideas and concepts that evolved over the centuries in mathematics and so deeply influenced society. The topics lie in areas as logic, number theory, graphs, topology, combinatorics, and others. Mathematical concepts like abstraction, proofs, modeling, existence, and the role of technology for mathematics will also be discussed. While the treatment will be rather non-formal, thinking and problem-solving skills will be emphasized. An attempt will be done to relate the mathematics presented to the world outside of mathematics by discussing applications of these ideas, the biographies and life circumstances of mathematicians, and influences from society to mathematics.

MAT 109 Introduction to Game Theory

This course is an elementary introduction to Game Theory. It focuses on how to ana-lyze situations and make rational decisions based on the information gathered. Students will analyze parlor games, gambling, and real-world situations. As mathematical basis for the analysis, Probability Theory and some Algebra are needed, but will be developed in detail

MAT 115T Measuring the Alps

People live in three-dimensional space but are restricted to the earth surface which is usually locally flat, two-dimensional. But when entering the Alps, the third dimension of height becomes important when describing location or movement. This is also expressed by the fact that in the mountains a map is not too useful---rather a topographic map is needed. Starting with a description of the Alps or any mountains by topographic maps, or mathematically as functions with two independent variables, students will investigate how certain well-known features are reflected by the topography of the area . Examples are the location of mountain brooks, watersheds, movement of glaciers, avalanches, and rockfall. Students will also investigate the question of visibility in the mountains, whether and how it is possible to predict what can be seen from where. A further aspect is GPS technology. During the travel, the class will visit various places in the Swiss, Austrian, and Italian Alps, such as Davos, Innsbruck, Meran. Students will hike and measure, but will also discuss questions relevant to Alpine life, such as glaciers, avalanches or rockfall forecasts. If possible, the class will also visit places where such research is conducted.

MAT 199 First Year Seminar

Seminar topics change year to year. Please consult the Schedule of Classes for current seminar offerings.

MAT 200 Calculus

The course begins with a review of functions and their graphs, after which students are introduced to the concepts of differentiation and integration. Understanding is reinforced through extensive practical work, with a strong emphasis on applications in economics, statistics and management science.

MAT 201 Introduction to Statistics

Basic concepts of descriptive statistics, such as random variables, random sampling, histograms, central tendency measures, variance and standard deviation, probability rules, and correlation coefficients, are presented in this course. The most important probability distributions, binomial and normal, are introduced. Inferential statistics and sampling distributions are briefly covered in order to introduce statistical model building and linear regression analysis.

MAT 204 Discrete Mathematics

Discrete Mathematics approaches questions that are finite in nature. Combinatorics provides formulas for the numbers of certain mathematical "objects". An example is to find the number of different ways one can fill a given rectangle with dominos. With the rise of the computer in the second half of the last century, optimization problems became more prominent, where one is supposed to find a "best" substructure in a given discrete structure. An example is to find a shortest path from A to B in a finite network. Counting principles, from simple ones to recurrence relations and generating functions, are presented, and algorithms for optimization problems on different discrete structures, like graphs, partially ordered sets, and others, are introduced and analyzed. The roles of proofs and algorithms for these questions are discussed thoroughly. Public key cryptography is also covered.

MAT 307 Multivariable Calculus and Linear Algebra

The first half of the course gives an introduction into Linear Algebra. Vectors and vector spaces, analytical geometry, matrices and linear equations, and their rank, and also determinants are discussed. The second half of the course discusses the theory of partial and total derivatives for functions of several variables. Topics considered here are limits, partial derivatives, chain rule, gradients, and optimization with or without restrictions.

MAT 308 Undergraduate Mathematical Research

Undergraduate research project in mathematics. The goal is to produce a research paper on a topic selected together with the instructor, and to submit it to some journal for undergraduate research in mathematics. Presentation at some conference on undergraduate research is also encouraged.

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Philosophy

PHL 100 Introduction to Philosophy

This course considers central problems of Western philosophy with particular emphasis on epistemology and metaphysics, through analysis of writing by influential ancient, modern and contemporary philosophers in historical context. After a brief survey of ancient and medieval systems of thought, such as Platonism and scholasticism, attention is focused on modern systems of thought, such as rationalism, empiricism, idealism, pragmatism, existentialism and logical positivism. Time is divided between developing a understanding of the history of ideas on the one hand and considering the central philosophical questions as they apply here and now on the other. Students will study a wide range of philosophical writings, and will begin to develop their ability to produce rigorous analysis, systematic critique and careful thinking in their own writing. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

PHL 200 Mind and Meaning

What is the relationship between our words and our possibilities of knowing the world, and to what extent might the languages we inherit shape what we can think? In this course, students will focus on a small number of central contemporary debates in the literature related to this topic, including the philosophy of knowledge (epistemology) and the philosophy of language. Starting from an overview of the most influential positions from the twentieth century, including Karl Popper, W.V.O.Quine, Saul Kripke and Daniel Dennett, students will review the literature in recent books and academic journals so as to compare and contrast the positions presented. As a class, students will classify the range of available positions in the contemporary debate with labels and representative writers, and subsequently build their own positions on the nature of the mind, language, identity and knowledge.

PHL 295 Faculty Fellows Summer Program

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Political Science

POL 100 Introduction to Political Science

Basic concepts of the discipline are discussed in this class with a focus on the evolution of the state and the role of the individual from historical, ideological, and comparative perspectives.

POL 101 Introduction to International Relations

This course provides the basic analytic tools necessary for the understanding of international relations. After a brief introduction to the realist and liberal approaches to the study of international relations, the course covers various fundamental concepts, such as national power, foreign policy, conflict, political economy, international trade, and international organizations.

POL 101T Introduction to International Relations

This lecture and travel course provides the basic analytic tools necessary for the understanding of international relations. After a brief introduction to the realist and liberal approaches to the study of international relations, the course covers various fundamental concepts, such as national power, foreign policy, conflict, political economy, international trade and international organizations. The travel section of the class will vary depending on the destination for the semester.

POL 199 First Year Seminar

Seminar topics change year to year. Please consult the Schedule of Classes for current seminar offerings.

POL 201 Government and Politics of the United States

The structure of the American polity is examined in theory and practice. Its salient characteristics are analyzed from historical, sociological and economic standpoints with a focus on current issues. (Formerly POL 104. Students who have previously earned credit for POL 104 cannot also earn credit for POL 201.)

POL 204 Government and Politics of Latin America

This survey course will introduce students to the historical, cultural, social, and economic dimensions that have characterized the founding, development, and contemporary evolution of the political systems of Latin America. After an introduction to the geography and history of the region, the course will look at the major political developments, trends and movements in Latin America during the 20th Century. The second half of the course will look at the political systems (and their historical/economic context) in selected Latin American countries. (Students who have taken POL 225T may not also earn credit for POL 204.)

POL 206 Dynamics of European Integration

A lecture-seminar course devoted to an in-depth study of the process and problems of European integration and the development of the European Union's relations with the rest of the world. The focus is the historical growth of European integration, the problems of specific policy areas of the Communities, enlargement and the development of the relations with Russia, the Middle East, and the developing states. The effects of the Maastricht Treaty are analyzed and the challenges of enlargement are assessed.

POL 207 Contemporary Russia

Since the end of World War II Russia has passed through and endured a series of seismic changes. Once the heart of the expansive Soviet empire, the Russian Republic that emerged in the 1990s after the breakup of the Soviet Union was beset by economic collapse, social decay and a new era of political corruption under Boris Yeltsin. Since 2000 and the rise to power of Vladimir Putin, the Russia of the 21st century is endeavoring to restore its influence in world affairs while using its vast natural resources to revitalize its sputtering economy. This course will examine the different phases through which Russia has passed since World War II, surveying the salient political, social and economic events that have shaped Russian domestic life as well as Russias changing relationship with other nations and regions, including the US, China and the Middle East.

POL 222T Politics and Society in the Baltic Region

The countries around the Baltic Sea are among the most progressive liberal democracies in the world and boast some of the highest levels of human development indicators. How can this success be explained? This course will take a comparative approach to the study of their political and social institutions. Readings and lectures will first review the Hanseatic League, an early confederation of trading cities largely centered in this area, and then focus on Germany and Sweden, two of the historical and economic powers in the region. The course will also look into recent developments in Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, that broke away from the Soviet Union and have successfully rejoined the Baltic community. The role of Russia and current international relations in the region will also be explored. Assignments will allow students to explore specific historical, political, economic or cultural issues. The travel portion of the course will feature Vilnius, Riga, Tallinn and Helsinki, in order to get an impression of the socio-cultural vibrancy of this region. Lectures, meetings with local leaders, and visits to their spectacular Old Towns will provide the basis for understanding their recent history and present situation.

POL 223T Italy: Politics, Culture, and Society

This course will introduce students to the contemporary politics of Italy and the issues that are confronting its policy makers and people. The focus is on the evolution of Italian society after World War II and the cultural, economic, and social trends that have shaped its political system. The goal of this course is to give the students a comprehensive picture of contemporary Italy and the political challenges facing Italians today. The travel component for Fall 2016 focuses on Puglia, a region that highlights the intersections of tradition and transformation in Italian society.

POL 224 Politics and Society in Switzerland

Switzerland boasts one of the oldest and most stable democracies in the world. Political and other social scientists have studied the Swiss system extensively and tried to address what is sometimes referred to as "the mystery of Swiss identity". This course will take a systematic approach to the study of Swiss political and social institutions, with particular attention to the federal structures and electoral system. Readings and lectures will also review some of the economic, historical, social and cultural dimensions that underpin Swiss politics. Assignments will allow students to explore specific issues in the context of their own majors.

POL 225T Politics and Society in Mesoamerica

Using a comparative approach, this Academic Travel course examines the historical, political, social, and economic factors that shape the countries of Mesoamerica and the geographical understanding of that region. Readings and class discussions will explore and compare the recent efforts in various countries to achieve viable democracies and sustainable economic development. The role of the United States and its policies in the region will also be considered. The travel component of this course will feature Guatemala, where many of the characteristic features of the region's history can be observed. Students will visit various UNESCO World Heritage Sites and/or protected areas and also meet with political and social leaders to learn about and discuss current issues.

POL 226T Spain: Politics, Culture and Society

This course will introduce students to the contemporary politics of Spain and the issues that are confronting its policy makers and people. The focus will be mainly on the evolution of Spanish society since the Spanish civil war and the cultural, economic, and social trends that have shaped its political system to date. The travel component includes, principally, Madrid and Seville. The purpose of this course is to help students develop deeper insights into the political origins of contemporary Spanish society.

POL 253 United States Foreign Policy

This course will describe and analyze the political, strategic and economic dimensions of American foreign policy. Special focus will be directed toward the issues that have confronted American decision makers since 1939. Examples and case studies drawn from American relations with the USSR, Europe, the Far East, the Middle East and Latin America will be studied in detail. The global implications of American influence and hegemony in the international system will be analyzed from the standpoint of trends and developments since the end of the Cold War and the attack on the Twin Towers.

POL 261 International Relations of the Far East: China, Japan, and South Korea

The aim of this course is to introduce and analyze the international relations of the Far East: China, Japan, and the Koreas. Students will be introduced to the domestic and external policies of these major states that have seen their evolution first with Japan and later China and South Korea from pre-modern societies to dynamic national entities that are now influencing international relations and the economic configuration of the world at large. Students will examine the sources of conflict and cooperation ranging from outright war to the economic integration, especially of China, in the international economic system.

POL 281T Sustainable Development in Africa: Politics, Prospects, and Practice

This interdisciplinary course explores the politics and practice of sustainable development in Africa (destination countries may change). Through a series of on-site explorations in the host countries, problem-based exercises, service learning and presentations by local university professors, public policy makers (to include NGOs) and experts in sustainable development, students will learn about the political, social, economic, environmental and cultural relationships that encompass the important field of sustainable development. Students will come to better understand how each country approaches sustainable development and natural resource management through participation in on-site expeditions and visits. Student research projects will include team-based case studies in the areas of sustainable agriculture, renewable energy, water and natural resource management, and sustainable housing in light of global environmental issues such as deforestation, water resource and human habitat degradation, threats to biodiversity, and conventional models of development. Please note: The field portion of the course will include traveling in overland vehicles with experienced guides. Accommodations will be in either backpacker lodges (dormitory style beds) or in safari tents at campgrounds with hot showers and toilets.

POL 290 Government and Politics of the Middle East

This course examines the political processes that shape conflict and consensus in Middle Eastern societies. From this perspective, main regional conflicts are analyzed. The confrontation between (1)Iran and the Arab World and (2)Israel and the region at large are surveyed in light of intra-Arab antagonisms and the historical great power rivalry for hegemony in the area. Special focus is directed toward an understanding of the politics of modernization and the clash between tradition and modernity.

POL 290T Government and Politics of the Middle East (Cyprus)

Examining the political processes that shape conflict and cooperation in Middle Eastern societies, this academic travel course directs special focus to analysing the politics of modernization and the clash between tradition and modernity. The international dimension of the area will be approached in light of the historical conflicts that have shaped and continue to shape the region. Cyprus represents an excellent case study to understand the various conflicts which have come to define Middle Eastern societies, including religious and inter-ethnic conflicts and clashes over resources. Part of the island is controlled by Turkey and the other part is an independent, Greek speaking state, the Republic of Cyprus. Despite these many conflicts the Republic of Cyprus is a member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the European Union, and the United Nations.

POL 296 Faculty Fellows Summer Program

POL 300 Comparative Politics

The development of the modern nation-state is analyzed from a variety of theoretical viewpoints. The approach and methods of major social theorists are examined in detail. (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.) Formerly POL 400. Students who have previously earned credit for POL 400 cannot earn credit for POL 300.

POL 301 Theories of International Relations

This course concentrates on the major approaches, models and theories in the study of international relations. Micro and macro theories, deductive and inductive methods are explored from historical, political and economic perspectives. The relations between the major powers in the twentieth century are examined for their relevance in the study of international politics.

POL 302 Political Philosophy

This course is designed to familiarize students with the major currents of political philosophy. It covers a broad range of central thinkers from the major philosophers of ancient Greece up to the proponents of modern-day liberalism. The course situates political philosophies in their historical context of emergence and thereby provides an overview of the history of the central ideas which are at the heart of thinking about politics, society and justice. The reading of primary and secondary sources serves as the basis for in-depth class discussions and a critical engagement with the normative underpinnings of societal organization.(Formerly POL 102. Students cannot earn credit for both POL 102 and POL 302.) (This writing-intensive course counts towards the Academic Writing requirements.)

POL 310 International Law

This lecture-seminar course introduces students to the main elements of international law. The historical origins of the system, the sources of the law, the importance of territory, jurisdiction, recognition, treaties, claims and nationality, are studied both in theory and in applications. The examination of cases is emphasized.

POL 315 War and Contemporary Politics

The relationship between strategy, defense, and the dynamics of the nation state is examined in light of international political developments since 1939 and the consequences of armed conflict for the configuration of power in the international system. The course will focus on some of the conflicts of the second part of the 20th century and will go on to examine asymmetric and hybrid war, especially cyberwar after 9/11 and its impact on the political stability of the international system in the 21st century.

POL 321 International Organization

The focus of this course is the development of supra-national and international agencies and entities. The United Nations, the European Union, the IMF, the World Bank, trading blocs, and other specialized agencies are studied as examples-in light of increasing economic interdependence in the international system.

POL 370 Topics in Politial Science

Special Topics in Political Science vary from semester to semester.

POL 376 International Environmental Politics

It has become increasingly apparent in recent years that environmental problems have been proliferating and nation-states are not able to cope with them individually. International cooperation is essential to finding and applying solutions. This course will first examine the nature and the sources of the main environmental problems affecting the lives of nations, such as climate change and its effects, including the ozone layer and the greenhouse effect, acid rain, desertification, pollution, disposal of radioactive and chemical waste material, etc. Students will look at the environmental problems connected to trade globalization and the question of sustainable development and will study how states have tried to deal with these problems and the role of international organizations such as the UN and the EU and non-governmental organizations such as Greenpeace, etc. The effectiveness of international treaties such as the Kyoto Protocol and the problems in their application will also be examined. (Formerly POL 276. Students who have previously earned credit for POL 276 cannot earn credit for POL 376.)

POL 377 International Political Economy

The interplay between political and economic issues has become central to the study of international relations in the modern world. This course will examine the traditional theoretical foundations of International Political Economy (the views of the liberals, the Marxists, the nationalists, etc.) and their applicability to today's world. Using an inter-disciplinary approach, the course will look at both historical background and present-day issues and conditions. The problems of development and North-South relations and the question of sustainability will be examined. International trade issues, such as the relations between trade globalization and environmental and human rights concerns and the role of institutions such as, the WTO, the IMF and G8 meetings will be studied. Finally the course will also consider new problem areas such as the internet and its control and e-commerce and the emerging role of non-governmental organizations.(Formerly POL 277. Students cannot earn credit for both POL 277 and POL 377.)

POL 378 International Politics of Energy

The politics of energy play a fundamental role in economic processes, growth and development. Energy crises in the recent past have demonstrated very clearly that no government can afford to ignore energy issues. For that matter, guaranteeing access to energy resources at reasonable costs is of such importance today that it has also become a strategic concern directly linked to national security. This course will examine the supply, the availability, the distribution and the use of energy resources internationally and the policies that states adopt to try to assure that their needs will be met. Students will also study alternative energy sources beyond the traditional reliance on hydrocarbon fuels and how states and international organizations try to develop and promote their use. The close relations of energy policies to environmental questions and the role of non-governmental organizations in these questions will also be considered. Finally, the role of international organizations such as the OPEC, the International Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency will also be analyzed. (Formerly POL 278. Students cannot earn credit for both POL 278 and POL 378.)

POL 398 Human Rights in International Law and Politics

Since the end of the Second World War human rights have played a growing role in international law and in international politics. The heinous atrocities committed during the war, unparalleled in history in scope and horror, aroused worldwide indignation and gave rise to the desire to establish new rules and reinforce existing norms that could guarantee respect for fundamental human rights internationally. Conventional international law was developed through a series of multilateral treaties sponsored by the United Nations and institutions to guarantee respect for these norms were established. In spite of the broad consensus on the need for these norms and the institutions, the expansion of human rights has been accompanied by controversy in both legal application and political interpretation and usage. This course will examine the historical development and philosophical bases of human rights from the ancient world to the present before looking at the role of human rights in international law as it has developed since the Second World War. The course will look at how the introduction of human rights into the area of international law has affected fundamental precepts of the international law system itself and some of the problems this has created. Treaty law, customary law and growing jurisprudence will be considered. The course will also review to the problems of enforcement and application of human rights law both on a national and international level and the functioning of the various institutions (tribunals, IGOs and NGOs) that have been established with this purpose in mind. Finally students will examine the political role of human rights in the foreign policies of states and other organizations (such as the European Union) and the major issues confronting human rights today (terrorism, civil wars, new areas of expansion of human rights, such as international environmental law or the distribution of energy resources or water and the question of humanitarian intervention).

POL 497 Readings and Methods in Political Science and International Relations

This course serves as a capstone for departmental majors. It focuses on classical and contemporary contributions in our fields and directly addresses the methodologies which students need to write their final theses. Students will be required to actively prepare and discuss class readings. They will also have the opportunity to work on their thesis projects and to discuss these in class.

POL 499 Senior Thesis

Senior Thesis proposals are to be coordinated through the Department Chair.

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Psychology

PSY 100 Introduction to Psychology

This introductory course is designed to provide an overview of the field of psychology, including theoretical positions, major research areas and methods of gathering data. Subtopics of psychology, such as physiological processes, developmental, abnormal behavior and social psychology are discussed.

PSY 199 First Year Seminar

Seminar topics change year to year. Please consult the Schedule of Classes for current seminar offerings.

PSY 201 Social Psychology

Introduction to major theories and research findings of social psychology in order to provide an understanding of the roles of cognitive and motivational processes in social behavior. The focus of this course is on how people's behavior, feelings and thoughts are influenced through social environment.

PSY 202 Developmental Psychology

This course surveys the major areas of developmental psychology - the science of individual human development. The overall aim is to introduce students to the fundamental questions, ideas and approaches in the psychology of development. The course emphasizes an understanding of the methods, terms, theories and findings in the field, traces human development across the entire lifespan, and explores the basic developmental theories including the biological influences on development, behavior and learning. To complete the study of human development, the course presents a multi-cultural perspective, examining the diversity of human adaptations to change across the lifespan, by cultures around the world.

PSY 203 Theories of Personality

The course addresses itself to a comprehensive in-depth study of the following question: What is personality? The major theories of personality which are prominent and important today in the field of psychology are considered individually in detail, chronologically and comparatively. These include the classical psycho-analytical theory of Freud, Jungian theory, existential/phenomenological theories, cognitive theories and behavior psychology.

PSY 210 Cognitive Psychology

This course provides an in-depth exploration of human cognition, focusing on both classic and current issues. In this class, students will discuss how cognitive psychologists build theories (or models) of mental processes, and how these models are used to understand and predict behavior. Topics to be covered include (but may not be limited to): history of cognitive psychology, research methods in cognitive psychology, attention, perception, memory, language, and reasoning. In addition to these subjects, we will examine the research on social cognition, motivation, and emotions.

PSY 215 Research Methods in the Social Sciences

The overall aim of this course is to promote students understanding and knowledge of research methodology in the social sciences. The course has three main features: it addresses a wide range of perspectives, comprising both qualitative and quantitative approaches; it provides opportunities to learn and reflect from research practice in various social science fields, including clinical, developmental, social and work psychology; it encompasses both traditional/mainstream and critical research approaches, paying constant attention to real world research. An important part of the course is the Research Proposal, which students will draft in stages over the course of the semester. By working on their own research proposal throughout the course, students will have the opportunity to engage in relevant research activity, learning by doing in relation to crucial research principles and practices.

PSY 220 Multicultural Psychology

This course is intended to introduce and familiarize students with the concept of multicultural psychology. The entire field of psychology from a perspective that is mindful of the diversity in todays society will be considered. Students will explore the ways in which psychology is socially constructed and will pay particular attention to the following factors as they influence human development: oppression, language, acculturation, economic concerns, racism and prejudice, socio-political factors, child-rearing practices, religious practices, family structure and dynamics, and cultural values and attitudes.

PSY 297 Faculty Fellows Summer Program

PSY 301 Abnormal Psychology

A study of the major patterns of abnormal behavior and their description, diagnosis, interpretation, treatment, and prevention.

PSY 310 Organizational Psychology

This course will provide an in-depth exploration of the key concepts, theories, and research methods in Organizational Psychology. Organizations are complex networks of social relationships between individuals, within groups, and between groups. In this course, students will examine individual, interpersonal, group and cultural behaviors in organizations. Topics to be covered include: group decision-making and communication styles; managing group processes and team design; leadership and power strategies within groups; performance management and work teams; and networking and negotiation within and across groups and organizations.

PSY 315 Environmental Psychology

This course introduces a relatively new field of study in psychology that focuses on the interaction between the environment and human beings, examining how the physical features of the environment impact cognition, behavior, and well-being, and how human actions in turn produce immediate and long-term consequences on the environment. In this course, the environment is broadly defined to include not only our physical surroundings (both natural and built) but also the larger, socio-cultural and political milieu in which people live. This course will borrow ideas and information from a variety of other areas and disciplines, including anthropology, sociology, biology, geography, urban planning, public policy, and other areas. Topics to be covered include: dysfunctional and restorative environments, the effects of environmental stressors, the nature and use of personal space, environmental risk perception, psychological impact of ecological crises, values and attitudes towards nature, and conservation psychology.

PSY 370 Special Topics in Psychology

Topics in Psychology vary from year to year. They are advanced courses on specific topics not normally offered, and they may require additional pre-requisites or permission of instruction.

PSY 497 Senior Research Seminar in Psychology

This seminar provides students with a capstone experience in synthesizing their theoretical and methodological knowledge in the form of a high-quality research paper. Some of the major areas of research and theories in the field of communication and media studies will be reviewed and discussed in class as students work on their own research project. At the end of the semester, students will present their final research paper to an audience of students and professors. Students will also be encouraged to submit their paper to an appropriate conference venue around the world. (Prerequisite: Senior status)

PSY 498 Internship in Psychology

PSY 499 Senior Thesis in Psychology

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Social Justice and Sustainability

SJS 100 Sustainability and Social Justice: Ethics, Equality, and Environments

One of the fundamental questions we all face today is how to counter the urgent challenges posed by global climate change and unequal economic development. Questions coalescing around notions of ethics, justice, equality, and human rights intersect with questions of how to shape a culturally and environmentally sustainable world. Exploring a wide range of theoretical and practical perspectives on Sustainability, Social Justice and Ethics, this cross-disciplinary, introductory course will give students multiple disciplinary frameworks to think critically and productively about the intersections between the social and the natural worlds. The course provides the gateway to the program in Social Justice and Sustainability (SJS).

SJS 199 First Year Seminar

Seminar topics change year to year. Please see current FYS offerings.

SJS 297 Cultural Anthropology: Global Connections, Local Lives

Appreciating cultural diversity, analyzing global forces affecting peoples around the world, learning lessons about sustainability from small-scale societies, and valuing alternative world views and ways of solving human problemsthese all underpin the field of cultural anthropology. In this class, students look at linkages between global forces and local lives, and explore similarities and differences in ways of producing food, constructing families, understanding gender, making political decisions, and raising children.

SJS 499 Capstone: research-based thesis

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Sociology

SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology

This course introduces students to the tools, methods and concepts used by social scientists to examine the human condition. The broad issues to be addressed are the basic questions of social science: i.e. What is "society"? What does its structure look like and how does it work? How does it change? Why does it change? How does the individual influence society and how does society, influence the individual? In attempting to answer these questions the course examines the concepts of culture, personality, socialization, stratification, social institutions and social change.

SOC 296 Faculty Fellows Summer Program

Faculty Fellows Program courses are offered in the Summer sessions. Specific course offerings vary from year to year.

SOC 297 Faculty Fellows Summer Program

Faculty Fellows Program courses are offered in the Summer sessions. Specific course offerings vary from year to year.

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Studio Art

STA 104 Introduction to Fashion Studies

The course is a broad introduction to fashion studies, looking at the production of clothing from the point of view of the designer. Students will engage in the theoretical aspects of fashion design, as well as learn how to make fashion drawings and put together a 12-piece fashion line. The course will have a significant reading component and also discuss actual topics, such as sustainability and fashion, and how fashion design can be a cultural connector.

STA 105 Introduction to Sculpture

An introductory course intended to develop the students' awareness of the third dimension. The course uses the five platonic solids as a vehicle of discovery of three dimensional space. Beginning with the construction of a "space frame" in the form of either a tetrahedron or a cube using wood doweling, the students analyze and describe the space inside the volume without the use of curved lines, using easy manageable materials. The students then move on to consider cylinders, cones and spheres, and work with curves, both simple and complex. They study natural forms that they themselves find and select to work from, starting a new project creating one or more structures from these things, giving them a basic knowledge of working in metal, plexiglas, plaster, clay, wood and glass. (This course carries a nominal fee for art supplies)

STA 106 Introduction to Printmaking

This experimental, introductory course will explore the creative possibilities of media that have often been considered largely mechanical and reproductive processes. Comments on the history of printing will be integrated in lessons on relief and intaglio printing processes (monoprints, linoleum cuts, wood block prints, embossing, drypoint). Visits to museums, exhibits or ateliers may be organized if possible. (This course carries a fee for art supplies.)

STA 107 Introduction to Digital Photography

This course course in digital photography introduces the beginner to the elements of digital photography. There will be two areas of concentration: 1. Image capture and manipulation using digital imaging technology (cameras and editing software). 2. Photograph design (crafting a photograph that reflects the photographers intention using composition, framing, lighting etc.). Throughout the course emphasis will be placed on the artistic value of photographs rather than the technicalities of digital imaging. Photography is one of the various artistic media available for self-expression and much emphasis will be put on precisely that. Students will synthesize these elements to create a portfolio of work that reflects not only their newly developed skills but also an appreciation and understanding of photography as an art medium.

STA 111 Introduction to Drawing

An introductory course aimed at mastering the rudiments of drawing (light and shadow, perspective, proportions, texture, pattern and design) and investigating the discipline of drawing as a cognitive tool. A variety of media, styles and genre will be explored, such as still life, landscape, figure drawing and abstraction. Studio sessions will be integrated with slide presentations and videos, and visits to museums, exhibits or ateliers may be organized if possible. The course carries a fee for art supplies.

STA 112 Introductory Watercolor Techniques

This introductory course will explore basic watercolor painting techniques. Starting with exercises aimed at understanding the nature of the medium, students will then move on to investigate various aspects of watercolor painting (direct methods, tonal and color layering, color theory, sketching and painting en plein air, sources of inspiration). Visits to museums, exhibits or ateliers may be organized if possible. The course carries a fee for art supplies.

STA 114 Drawing Related Media

The course will explore various media related to drawing, like pen and ink, charcoal, colored pencils, felt tip markers, tissue paper and glue, collage, crayons, oil and watercolor pastels, watercolor, tempera, gouache, spray paint. There is virtually no limit to the media that may be employed during the semester. At the same time, the course also reinforces the rudiments of drawing, but with primary emphasis on materials and new media rather than theoretical questions. The course carries a fee for art supplies.

STA 115 Introductory Painting

This introductory course explores basic painting techniques and attempts to assist the development of visual awareness through various experiments and media, thus providing a foundation for further art study. With a combination of theory and studio practice, the course investigates the properties of color, line, point, plane and texture in an effort to free students from dead convention and at the same time encourage their creative abilities. The course will incorporate structured exercises on the nature of paint and the rudiments of color theory, while encouraging students to study the painting of past and present artists to develop their own creative identity. Visits to museums, galleries or ateliers may be organized if possible. The course carries a fee for art supplies.

STA 125 Basic Design

This course is based on the experimentation of basic design exercises belonging to the tradition of schools of design such as the Bauhaus, the School of Design at the IIT, the Hochschule fr Gestaltung Ulm. The course aims at developing basic knowledge useful at different scales in the process of education of a designer: theories of color, hierarchy and design of information, symbolization, visual characterization and rhetoric. During the course, notions of history of typography and graphic design, visual semiotics, information design and printing techniques are provided. Aim of the course is to produce a series of 16 pages books and an exhibition to display the results. Teaching is practice based and follows the approach "learning-by-doing".

STA 179 Photography on Location in Europe

Aimed at beginning and intermediate students exploring the countryside, towns, villages, and interiors of Ticino, this digital photography course concentrates on the dynamics of composition through the use of color and natural light. (Students in this course must provide their own tools for some of the techniques, and a digital camera is required. The course carries a fee for art supplies and equipment.)

STA 200 Computer Graphics in Advertising

An introductory course to graphic design software and to the principles and practices of advertising graphics. Once the basics have been learned, the course covers the following aspects of graphic design: the psychology of advertising, the brief from the client and the working relationship between client and designer, font styles and typographic design, the company logo, letterhead, business cards etc., house-styling, company reports, brochures, flyers, book covers, color printing and printing processes. The course requires that initial design concepts be taken from the early stages through to finished art-work, i.e. the quality of finish required for presentation to the client.(This course carries a nominal fee for computer supplies)

STA 205 Intermediate Sculpture

Continued exploration of basic sculptural methods, the students choose something that has particularly caught and absorbed their interest from the information touched on in the introductory course. They select a major project and investigate this chosen area much more thoroughly, developing a more substantial awareness along with more technical proficiency regarding materials. They can choose to construct, carve, or model and cast, and either to work from a personal idea or, if they prefer, using a model, they can make a portrait head and cast it in plaster: the stage at which it could be realized in bronze by a foundry. Students will be encouraged to visit exhibitions and become aware of both historical and current tendencies in art. (This course carries a nominal fee for art supplies)

STA 206 Intermediate Printmaking

Intermediate course aimed at further developing the basic printing skills learned in STA 106. More techniques of printmaking may be explored, for example, silkscreen or collagraph. (This course carries a fee for art supplies.)

STA 207 Intermediate Digital Photography

A more intermediate course where students who have completed STA 107 may take their work further. The course carries a fee for art supplies.

STA 208 Photography and Film Studies

Students will create their own "Camera obscura" through that experience and aimed knowledge the course will introduce the basic skills of photography, such as using composition, framing, lighting etc. Aimed at beginning and intermediate students exploring photography, this course concentrates on the dynamics of composition through the use of the concept of visual communication and developing the artistic value of the students' photographs, experienced in applying to professional contexts key approaches and theories of visual communication. An important part of the course will be, the exploring of Venice as a film-sight in combination with film studies such as symbols and aesthetics, by developing and visualizing own storyboards. Throughout the course students will not only develop their own skills and create a portfolio of their own, but also understand photography as an art medium and way of visual communication.

STA 209 The Video Essay: From Conception to Projection

This is a hands-on course designed to explore key aspects of an exciting contemporary film genre known as The Video Essay: a branch of experimental cinema which stems from the contributions of avant-garde filmmakers such as Man Ray, Jean-Luc Godard, Nam June Paik, and Bill Viola. Video Art, like its celluloid counterpart in experimental film, emphasizes the artistic potential of the film medium, as opposed to cinema's more common function as an object of consumption for entertainment value. As the etymology of the name implies, the video essay is an expression of how and what we see when we try to make visual sense of the world. The key aspects of videomaking to be studied in this course have been divided into four learning modules. Each module corresponds to one week in the four- week summer program, each week being dedicated to one of the questions noted above. These learning modules are: 1) Conceptualizing the Image; 2) Capturing the Image; 3) Contextualizing the Image; and 4) Projecting the Image. Students will be evaluated on a portfolio comprised of four completed video essays, with accompanying statements of artistic intent, and one conclusive paper which will be presented orally to the class. Students enrolled in this class must have their own digital video recording device.

STA 211 Intermediate Drawing

Intermediate course aimed at further developing the basic skills learned in STA 111. More emphasis will be placed on developing individual projects, exploring various media and investigating problems in drawing and perception. The course carries a fee for art supplies.

STA 212 Intermediate Watercolor Techniques

Intermediate course aimed at further developing the basic skills learned in STA 112. More emphasis will be placed on developing individual projects and exploring watercolor-related media. The course carries a fee for art supplies.

STA 214 Drawing Related Media

Intermediate course aimed at further developing the basic skills learned in STA 114. More emphasis will be placed on developing individual projects. The course carries a fee for art supplies.

STA 215 Intermediate Painting

Intermediate course aimed at further developing the basic skills learned in STA 115. More emphasis will be placed on developing individual projects and exploring different media and genre as students work towards finding a personal identity through creative experience. The course carries a fee for art supplies.

STA 218 Digital Media and Career Web Design

The course considers the examination and analysis of Digital Media in sociological approaches global image and information in the digital environment. Students will consider: New Media and the role it plays in our lives. Specifically, students will leave the course with a basic personal web site to jumpstart their career in locating a job or internship. This course is good for all students and disciplines. Students will photograph themselves and consider images and video from their field of study, create their resume, write two articles about their field: all to be included in their personal site. Students will consider online tools such as YouTube and branding for competition in their career fields. Digital camera and/or video are recommended.

STA 220 Heads and Bodies: the Human Head and Proportions in Art History, Theory and Practice

The human head is one of the most fascinating subjects in the history of art, and frequently perceived as one of the most difficult problems to tackle. The head is the basic unit of human proportions, and the key to human identity. This course will investigate the human head and human proportions in art - in painting and sculpture; in all periods and cultures. Through lectures and presentations, visits to museums or other places of interest and studio sessions, students will have the opportunity to study this subject in depth and to experiment with it using various techniques in the studio. Studio sessions and lectures will deal with the following topics: 1. Human proportions: fundamental concepts. 2. Ideal canons in the Western European tradition. 2.1 The head as basic unit. 2.2 Famous canons: the Golden Ratio, Polykleitos, Praxiteles, Vitruvian man, Leonardo, Le Corbusier. 2.3 Alignment of facial features: likeness. 2.4 Men, women and children; the ages of man. 2.5 Larger than life: comics and caricature. 2.6 The twentieth century. 3. Non-Western Ideals. 4. Beyond art and aesthetics: medicine, forensics and other applications. Studio assignments will be organized in the following media: drawing and related media, painting, clay modeling. Visits to Ticino museums will be organized according to relevance for the course (in Lugano: Museo delle Culture, Museo d'Arte, Bernasaconi home museum, Museo Cantonale; Museo Vela in Ligornetto).

STA 225 Fashion Drawing: The Language of Design

Using fashion concepts as a springboard, students will develop drawing and presentation skills while addressing the role of drawing as a unique language for invention, description and communication. Students will create initial concept sketches and final drawings in a variety of wet and dry media while exploring core drawing principles such as volume, space, value and color. (There will be an additional fee for studio supplies.)

STA 230 The Fashion of Form: Concept to Construction

In this hands-on class, students will develop a personal a motif or aesthetic through which to create a series of three-dimensional forms and fashion garments. Drawing on the world around them, students will examine 2D design concepts, drawing essentials, and the use of sustainable materials as part of their process. (There will be an additional fee for studio supplies.)

STA 235 Sustainability and the Studio

Over the past few decades, sustainability has become a movement in the visual arts, shifting from a purely ecological to a larger cultural context and covering a vast range of ecological, economic, political, moral and ethical concerns. Sustainable art is usually distinguished from earlier movements like environmental art in that it advocates issues in sustainability, like ecology, social justice, non-violence and grassroots democracy. This studio course will approach sustainability and artistic practice from a number of viewpoints and modes of working. After a general introduction to sustainability in the arts today through lectures, videos and discussions, students will do creative projects, presentations and papers on current social issues or environmental concerns, the use of sustainable materials, recycling materials, community outreach, local environmental and sustainability initiatives). Class sessions may involve trips off-campus or organizing an exhibition or event. There is a course fee to cover materials and travel expenses.

STA 240T Sustainability and Art in Europe

Over the past few decades, sustainability has become a movement in the visual arts, shifting from a purely ecological to a larger cultural context and covering a vast range of ecological, economic, political, moral and ethical concerns. Sustainable art is usually distinguished from earlier movements like environmental art in that it advocates issues in sustainability, like ecology, social justice, non-violence and grassroots democracy. This studio course will approach sustainability and artistic practice from a number of viewpoints and modalities. In addition to providing a general introduction to sustainability in the arts and the evolving role of the arts in today's society, students will engage in creative projects, presentations and papers on current social issues and/or environmental concerns (including for example the use of sustainable materials, recycling materials, community outreach, local environmental and sustainability initiatives). During the academic travel period, students will travel to cities in Switzerland and Northern Italy (Lausanne, Milan, Venice) to see exhibitions and to visit institutions, organizations and artists who are concerned with sustainability and related issues. This part of the course may also involve a creative project that seeks to envisage art as a catalyst to stimulate discourse and foster change. There is a studio fee to cover materials and travel expenses.

STA 275T Studies in Ceramics: Northern and Central Italy

This introductory ceramics course combines art history and studio work with an intensive travel period in northern and central Italy. Students will be given the opportunity to understand the complete process of producing objects in clay and terracotta, from the first planning/designing phases, through the basic modeling techniques, to the more complicated processes of firing and glazing. Studio sessions both on and off campus will incorporate lectures on artists and art movements, as well as visits to local venues, major museums and other sites of importance with regard to the use of clay and terracotta in the fine arts. The on-campus lectures aim to provide students with an understanding of the importance of northern and central Italy for the history of ceramics from the age of the Etruscans to the present day. All students will have the opportunity to do in-depth, intensive work in clay modeling, hand-built ceramics and glazing techniques. The first part of the course will focus on the functional aspects of the terracotta object, while the second will introduce terracotta as sculpture.

STA 279 The Video Essay and Photography on Location in Europe

Aimed at beginning and intermediate students, this digital-based media course (photography, sound and video) is designed to reveal key aspects of the production of the video essay through excursions in the Ticino region, studio work and critical discussions based on readings and screenings. The video essay is an expression of how and what we see when we try to make visual sense of the world-- a genre of experience. Through projects using photography, sound and video, students will explore this dynamic genre and how it can be used to express place and their relationship to it, with the goal of producing a personal portfolio of creative work. Students enrolled in this class must have their own digital video recording device, which can range from a smart phone to a digital camera or video camera. The course carries a nominal fee of 100 CHF or USD 100 for art supplies and travel expenses.

STA 280T Adventures in Printmaking: Northern and Central Italy

This experimental, introductory course will explore the creative possibilities of media which have largely been considered mechanical, reproductive processes. Brief introductory lectures will introduce and demonstrate the following techniques: simple printing methods that do not use the printing press (direct stamping, stenciling, monotype, frottage); relief printing methods using linoleum, wood blocks and other surfaces; intaglio techniques (dry point). As time permits, collograph and silkscreen printing will also be introduced. The course has the following goals: to gain knowledge of printing materials, equipment and techniques; to produce prints using the techniques introduced during the course; to understand printing techniques in an art historical perspective and acknowledge of printing as a fine art; to construct a basic art vocabulary and develop the skills necessary to critical visual analysis. This Academic Travel course will travel to Northern and Central Italy to visit museums, print and drawing collections and places where artists work and printmaking workshops are held in order to provide in-depth knowledge of printmaking and to learn techniques that cannot be done at Franklins studio facilities an adventure in printmaking!

STA 295 Faculty Fellows Summer Program

Faculty Fellows Program courses are offered in the Summer sessions. Specific course offerings vary from year to year.

STA 300 Computer Graphics in Advertising, Advanced

This course is fundamentally a follow-on from STA 200, Computer Graphics in Advertising. Throughout the semester, students are expected to complete a broad variety of projects, individually and in form of group work, and bring them to a finished state. Possible areas of concentration may include digital branding, interaction design, digital formats, innovative design, campaign design and corporate promotion. (This course carries a nominal fee for computer supplies).

STA 305 Higher Sculpture

The level of this course presupposes that students have already acquired some knowledge of historic and current tendencies in art which they will consider in relation to their own semesters work. The project (or projects) undertaken will be a continued exploration of sculptural methods using both additive and subtractive techniques aimed at producing well-conceived three dimensional works and experimentation with diverse materials. This course carries a fee for art supplies

STA 306 Advanced Printmaking

A higher course aimed at further developing the basic printing skills learned in STA 206. Emphasis will be placed on developing individual projects, and more techniques of printmaking may be explored, for example, silkscreen or collagraph. (This course carries a fee for art supplies.)

STA 307 Advanced Digital Photography

A more advanced course where students who have completed STA 207 may take their work further. The course carries a fee for art supplies.

STA 311 Advanced Drawing

A higher course aimed at further developing the basic skills learned in STA 211. More emphasis will be placed on developing individual projects, exploring various media and investigating drawing and perception. The course carries a fee for art supplies.

STA 312 Advanced Watercolor Painting

A higher course aimed at further developing the basic skills learned in STA 212. More emphasis will be placed on developing individual projects and exploring watercolor-related media. The course carries a fee for art supplies.

STA 314 Drawing Related Media

A higher course aimed at further developing the basic skills learned in STA 114. More emphasis will be placed on developing individual projects. The course carries a fee for art supplies.

STA 315 Higher Painting

Continuation of the previous painting courses to more advanced levels. The course carries a fee for art supplies.

STA 320 Heads and Bodies: the Human Head and Proportions in Art History, Theory and Practice (Advanced)

Advanced - The human head is one of the most fascinating subjects in the history of art, and frequently perceived as one of the most difficult problems to tackle. The head is the basic unit of human proportions, and the key to human identity. This course will investigate the human head and human proportions in art - in painting and sculpture; in all periods and cultures. Through lectures and presentations, visits to museums or other places of interest and studio sessions, students will have the opportunity to study this subject in depth and to experiment with it using various techniques in the studio. Studio sessions and lectures will deal with the following topics: 1. Human proportions: fundamental concepts. 2. Ideal canons in the Western European tradition. 2.1 The head as basic unit. 2.2 Famous canons: the Golden Ratio, Polykleitos, Praxiteles, Vitruvian man, Leonardo, Le Corbusier. 2.3 Alignment of facial features: likeness. 2.4 Men, women and children; the ages of man. 2.5 Larger than life: comics and caricature. 2.6 The twentieth century. 3. Non-Western Ideals. 4. Beyond art and aesthetics: medicine, forensics and other applications. Studio assignments will be organized in the following media: drawing and related media, painting, clay modeling. Visits to Ticino museums will be organized according to relevance for the course (in Lugano: Museo delle Culture, Museo d'Arte, Bernasaconi home museum, Museo Cantonale; Museo Vela in Ligornetto).

STA 330T Umbria: A Warm Refuge for Inspiration: Art, Music and Life in Umbria, the Heart of Italy

The best time to travel in Umbria is July, when everything that this distinctive territory of art and culture has to offer can be most fully appreciated: two internationally renowned music festivals, Umbria Jazz in Perugia and the Festival dei Due Mondi in Spoleto, the outdoors through an excursion in the Sibylline mountains, a hike along the Franciscan trail between Spoleto and Assisi or a bike ride through vestiges of ancient Rome around Campello di Clitunno, local festivals celebrating Italian food and local traditions, and last but not least, art from the age of the Etruscans (Perugia, Orvieto) through the contemporary era (architecture by Fuksas, the Burri Foundation, CIAC in Foligno, Arnaldo Pomodoros Carapace living sculpture winery at Montefalco. All of this and much more can be experienced in the best way by being there. Finally, students will have the opportunity to live art fully by learning basic techniques of ceramics during a stay at a sculptors home and studio at La Fratta Art House, near Deruta. After a week in Lugano, with introductory lectures and films on the region and its traditions, art and music, the next 2 weeks will be spent in Umbria, alternating attendance at scheduled concerts and performances at Umbria Jazz and the Spoleto Festival with visits to nearby towns and villages to see art, architecture, museums and monuments, engage in outdoor activities or visit local industries (wine, olive oil, chocolate, ceramics). After Spoleto and Perugia, the group will move to La Fratta Art House, where they will live with an Italian artists family. Most of this part of the course will be dedicated to learning basic techniques of handbuilding and clay modeling. Many of the lessons will be conducted in Italian (with a translator) so the trip will have a high component of language immersion, and the stay at La Fratta Art House will be total immersion in Italian language and culture.

STA 331T Umbria: Sustaining Art in the Heart of Italy

The region of Umbria stakes its reputation on slow living and sustainability. Located in the center of Italy, and also known as its green heart, it has one of the highest pro capita percentages of UNESCO World Heritage sites in the world. Preserving this heritage and continuing to keep age-old traditions alive have contributed to making sustainability a way of life, as in the title of the overview of 20 years of EU research into cultural heritage, Preserving Our Heritage; Improving Our Environment. This course will provide a unique opportunity for students to study the area on site, concentrating on different ways in which this challenge has or has not been met, ranging from world famous performing arts festivals to ventures in sustainable living. At the same time, the course features an intensive arts experience through visits to art cities, museums, areas of natural beauty, enological and gastronomical firms, as well as attendance at local seasonal fairs and festivals of music and the performing arts. There is a studio component of the course: STA 331T will be taken together with STA115/215/315 Painting, which will focus on projects and techniques particularly suited to sustainability themes.

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Theatre

THR 150 Drama Production

This course presents a general overview of drama production. Participation in one or more of the many dimensions of the student drama production is an integral part of this course. Students will read and study the play for any given term. In addition, students will read and familiarize themselves with other critical material relevant to the production. Students will spend time both in the classroom and in the theater preparing for the semesters production.

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Visual and Communication Arts

VCA 120 Documentary and Street Photography

SPECIAL SITUATION

VCA 120T Documentary and Street Photography on Location

Documentary and Street Photography on Location will investigate the particularities of both documentary and street photography through readings and studio projects. It will shed light on the history of photography; how the visual world communicates, studying the interaction of photography with other visual media; and will pay specific attention to the semiotic potential and challenges of photography. Students will engage in a project that relates to the location of the travel component of the class, documenting a subject of their choice. For Fall 2016 the travel destinations will be Berlin and Munich.

VCA 199 First Year Seminar

Seminar topics change year to year. Please consult the Schedule of Classes for current seminar offerings.

VCA 370 Topics in Visual Communication Arts

Topics in Visual Communication Arts are advanced courses on specific topics not normally offered and vary each semester. They may require additional pre-requisites or permission of the instructor. Course description and pre-requisites are specified in the session course description.

VCA 495 Senior Project in Visual Communication Arts

Senior projects are to be coordinated with the Department Chair. The course carries a fee for art supplies.

VCA 497 Visual Communication Arts Internship

Internships are to be coordinated in advance with the faculty advisor and the Department Chair.

VCA 499 Visual Communication Arts Thesis

VCA thesis proposals to be coordinated with the Department Chair and the faculty advisor.

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