Division of Communication, History, and Politics

Welcome to our Division

The division of Communication, History, and Politics (CHP) focuses on the development of human, organizational, societal, and international relations over time.

The CHP faculty members are experts in their respective fields and bring their research and professional experience to bear on their teaching in the classroom.

Our main educational focus in on experiential learning because it gives agency to students and facilitates discovery and personal growth. We will provide you with the support you need and the opportunity to closely work with your professors and advisors from your first day at Franklin, to the successful completion of your studies.

The CHP division offers a total of five majors: Communication and Media Studies, History, International Relations, Political Science, and Political Science with an emphasis on Global Political Economy.

Many of our majors can be combined with other majors (within and across divisions) and we offer a range of associated minor that allow students to tailor-make their educational experience. We are also very proud of being part of the legal studies and post-colonial programs at FUS.

We encourage our students to actively participate not only in the classroom, but in campus life more broadly. Feel invited to join our lecture series, open divisional meetings, our events with alumni, and our student led organizations, like the Political Discourse Society, or the Honors Society.

Our programs and our Liberal Arts focus aim to equip students with in-depth disciplinary knowledge, while enabling them to address real world challenges in an interdisciplinary way. Students with degrees from CHP have gone on to leading graduate schools, public service, IOs and NGOs. Many of our students also opt for the private sector and companies in a broad range of areas, including: museums and galleries, online and print media, publishing companies, administrations, and consulting and legal firms. Please also have a look at our Alumni and student testimonials.

Division Chair

Chair of the Academic Division of Communication, History and Politics
Associate Professor, Political Science

Ph.D. University of St. Gallen, Switzerland
M.A. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Germany

Office: Lowerre  Academic Center, Office 16 
Phone: +41 91 985 22 63
Email: bbucher@fus.edu

Bernd Bucher

HIGHLIGHTS

Lugano Dance Project | CHP Division

Dancing Free: the LAC Dance Program is a feature documentary project directed by Professor Elettra Fiumi, diving into the creative process journeys of the three choreographers, leading to the women’s final shows at Lugano’s LAC museum in late May 2022. In parallel, Fiumi is teaching a COM course on video production in the Spring of 2022, which takes the Dancing Free as a rallying ground; significantly, the course opens the possibility to involve students and FUS in the project through aspects of filming practice and site that can be used for the production of FUS visual imagery.

FEATURED PUBLICATION

Connecting the Two Seas: Negotiating an International Modus Vivendi – Italian and Ottoman Diplomacies in the Suez-Red Sea Area

 

Dr. Giorgio Ennas contributed to the publication of the book Italy and the Suez Canal. From the Mid-Nineteenth Century to the Cold War. A Mediterranean History (Edited by Barbara Curli) writing the chapter Connecting the Two Seas: Negotiating an International Modus Vivendi – Italian and Ottoman Diplomacies in the Suez-Red Sea Area.

In this chapter, Dr. Giorgio Ennas analyses the creation of a new inter-imperial border and the search for a new modus vivendi between the Ottoman empire and the Kingdom of Italy in the 19th century. Moreover, he describes the diplomatic negotiations behind the transformation of the political status of the Eastern Mediterranean, Suez Canal and Red Sea areas between the second half of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century. He shows how the opening of the Suez Canal produced an effective expansion of the Eastern Mediterranean geopolitical area, which gradually included the Red Sea.

Students & Alumni

Jordan Ricker '16

At Franklin, I learned how to see things not just from one perspective, but from multiple (and sometimes contradictory) perspectives, all of which are important in providing a more holistic view of a situation. This has helped me tremendously in my development both personally and professionally, as I was able to apply both my classroom and out-of-classroom learnings when I worked in Ghana and South Africa for a travel start-up and needed to successfully work with various different stakeholders with varying racial, socio-economic, linguistic, national, and ethnic backgrounds. 
 

Regarding my educational pathway after Franklin, I first completed a bilingual French/English MA in Contemporary European History at the University of Luxembourg, and I am now pursuing an MA in Comparative History at Central European University (CEU) in Vienna, Austria. 

The rigorous academics and the multicultural setting at Franklin allowed me to hit the ground running with these MA programs, as the University of Luxembourg is a tri-lingual university with approximately half of its students being international while CEU has more than 70% of its students coming from outside the EU. Additionally, CEU's demanding academic environment feels encouraging rather than intimidating due primarily to my experience at Franklin of professors focusing on the individual intellectual development of students.

As such, it was a very natural transition from Franklin to these other international universities for me. The skills I gained at Franklin, especially intercultural awareness, academic rigor, and an open mind, have been incredibly useful assets in both my professional and academic journeys as well as in my own personal development. I wouldn't trade my experience at Franklin for anything.

Eric Bishel '20

Words like “interdisciplinary” and “transnational” have become higher-ed buzzwords these days, gracing college websites from Rome to Shanghai.
Speaking from my own experience, few have been able to embrace these concepts as successfully as Franklin. With a combined major in Political Science and History, I spent my time exploring new ways to use these disciplines side by side. My studies culminated in my thesis, “Instruments of Memory: Human Rights Memorials for the Holocaust”, which explored the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as a new kind of memorial for mass suffering. In its writing, I drew both on independent research but also, quite strongly, on the classes that I had taken. I went through my old syllabi, for readings and class discussions that had made such an impact on me that I still remembered their content years later. As time has gone on, I still find myself drawing on what I learned at Franklin in conversations and experiences.  
 

It encouraged me to think outside borders, bridging gaps across cultures and preparing me for a workplace like the UN, where everyone is the only one from their country. Franklin took me to three continents and 12 countries, each with their own distinct ways of working, governing, and living. Inter-cultural communication and inter-disciplinary experience are the best training one can get for a career in international policy, where quick and creative engagement with foreign ideas is a necessity. Franklin facilitated and engaged both those things, giving me the tools and knowledge I need to understand and explore the world. 

Campbell Pair '22

My name is Campbell Pair and I am from Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America. I am a senior majoring in International Relations, with minors in Legal Studies, Italian, and History. Over the course of my time here at Franklin, I have had opportunities and experiences that I could not have had anywhere else ⁠—from meeting the Georgian Speaker of Parliament, to sitting in on a meeting at the OSCE in Vienna, to being able to attend the Athens Democracy Forum in Athens, Greece.
 

In addition to these opportunities, being able to learn from Professors that have had experiences working in their fields and have not focused only on the academics of the course subject, allows for a perspective that is difficult to research. Moreover, it is the professors and staff that have allowed Franklin to have such a positive impact on me; talking with them not only concerning classes but also about current events and our own lives. They have encouraged me to seek various different career paths, including what I am now planning on doing once I graduate, which will be to work on political campaigns in the U.S. 

Nauf Mawla '11

What I loved most about Franklin is that from the moment you step foot onto campus, you become part of a multinational and cross-cultural environment that stays with you long after you graduate. It’s an experience that everyone deserves, and I would do it again in a heartbeat!

Our Faculty

The CHP faculty is a close-knit group of scholars, united around a deep commitment to linking research and teaching, and to the values embodied in a Franklin education. We invite you to peruse our individual faculty profiles for more information and review the publications section below to see some of our recent scholarships.

Division Chair

Chair of the Academic Division of Communication, History and Politics
Associate Professor, Political Science

Ph.D. University of St. Gallen, Switzerland
M.A. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Germany

Office: Lowerre  Academic Center, Office 16 
Phone: +41 91 985 22 63
Email: bbucher@fus.edu

Bernd Bucher

Full-time Faculty

Executive in Residence, International Management and International Relations

Ph.D. Study (ABD), The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, USA
M.A. The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, USA
B.S.E. Princeton University, USA

Office: Lowerre Academic Center, Office 7
Phone: +41 91 986 36 71
Email: rcordon@fus.edu

Roberto Cordon

Associate Professor, History

Ph.D. National University of Ireland
M.A. National University of Ireland

Office: Lowerre Academic Center, Office 8
Phone: +41 91 986 36 39
Email: fhoey@fus.edu

Fintan Hoey

Associate Professor, History

Ph.D. Ludwigs Maximilians Universität München, Germany
M.A. Rheinische Friedrich Wilhelms Universität Bonn, Germany

Office: Lowerre Academic Center, Office 12
Phone: +41 91 986 36 37
Email: mpyka@fus.edu

Marcus Pyka

Assistant Professor, International Relations and Political Science

Ph.D, City University of Hong Kong
MA and BA, Sciences Po Paris

Office: Kaletsch Campus, Office 3 
Phone: +41 91 985 22 64
Email: jschwak@fus.edu

Juliette Schwak

Professor, Communication and Media Studies

Ph.D. Rutgers University, USA
M.A. Wake Forest University, USA
B.A. Sophia University, Tokyo, Japan

Office: Lowerre Academic Center, Office 9
Phone: +41 91 986 36 57
Email: ssugiyama@fus.edu

Satomi Sugiyama

Part-time Faculty

Adjunct Professor, Communication and Media Studies

Ph.D. University of Rome "La Sapienza"

Office: Lowerre Academic Center, Office 9
Phone: +41 91 986 36 57
Email: nbarile@fus.edu

Nello Barile

Professor Emeritus, International Relations and Political Science

Ph.D. York University, Canada
M.A. San Diego State University, USA
B.A. San Diego State University, USA

Office: Emeriti Office Space 
Phone: +41 91 985 22 69
Email: mmottale@fus.edu

Morris Mottale

Professor Emeritus, Political Science and International Management

Ph.D. University of Oregon, USA
M.A. Old Dominion University, USA
B.S. Old Dominion University, USA

Office: Kaletsch Campus, Emeritus Office 9
Phone: +41 91 986 53 41
Email: azanecchia@fus.edu

 

Armando Zanecchia
Our Highlights

Learn more about our upcoming and our latest CHP events, projects, and activities. In this section, you will also find information on some of our most recent publications and academic awards.

Lugano Dance Project | CHP Division

Dancing Free: the LAC Dance Program is a feature documentary project directed by Professor Elettra Fiumi, diving into the creative process journeys of the three choreographers, leading to the women’s final shows at Lugano’s LAC museum in late May 2022. In parallel, Fiumi is teaching a COM course on video production in the Spring of 2022, which takes the Dancing Free as a rallying ground; significantly, the course opens the possibility to involve students and FUS in the project through aspects of filming practice and site that can be used for the production of FUS visual imagery.

Morris Mottale - A debate on Joe Biden's America

Prof Morris Mottale was interviewed on November 19 in the Rete Uno studios of RSI, intervening in a debate about Joe Biden's America, between innovations and disappointments.

"The U.S. president managed to initiate one of the most important reforms in the country's history by getting Congress to vote on a $1.2 trillion plan to modernize the country's infrastructure. He ended the institutional instability of his predecessor. Yet Joe Biden's popularity is at an all-time low, his style is unconvincing and in foreign policy, he is always unmoored from Donald Trump, not to mention the repercussions of the Afghan fiasco. As for his deputy Kamala Harris, she seems to have disappeared from the proscenium. With Gaja Pellegrini Bettoli Italian-American analyst and journalist, Morris Mottale professor of international relations at Franklin University Switzerland, Mario del Pero expert on the United States, professor at Science Po (Paris), Emiliano Bos recently returned from the U.S. where he was RSI correspondent."

Prof. Fintan Hoey HIS 275 Travel

Nothing brings home the reality of a divided society in Northern Ireland like a visit to the ‘Peace Wall’ which divides the Protestant and Catholic communities in Belfast, Northern Ireland. In my Academic Travel, HIS 275T History of Modern Ireland, students learn about the causes and legacies of sectarian division in Ireland prior to traveling there and understand these things on a conceptual level. However, seeing the ‘Peace Wall,’ which is actually a fortified barrier running through the city, underscores the visceral nature of this continuing divide. This experience is heightened by meeting and interacting with local experts, many of whom lived through periods of political violence when they were the age the students are now.

Prof. Satomi Sugiyama: adding touch to our repertoire of everyday mediated interactions?

Mobile communication technologies, from smartphones to wearables, made it possible for us to communicate with our loved ones beyond geographical constraints. We can talk to them, hear them, see them, and feel their presence through technologies on the move even if they are physically absent. Although these technologies largely rely on the interface that we touch as exemplified by the now so familiar touch screen, technological mediation of our touch is still not commonly practiced. Do we desire to communicate our touch, a sense that is heavily intertwined with our affective, emotional experiences, over distance? I am currently exploring why we want or don’t want to add our touch to our repertoire of everyday mediated interactions. This ongoing research has been presented in several conferences in the past year including the “Socially Useful Robots in the era of social distancing and new normal - The needs, applications, barriers and solutions,” European Robotics Forum in April 2021. 

Dr. Schwak was invited to give a guest lecture at University of York

In February 2021, the Department of Social Policy and Social Work at the University of York (UK) welcomed Dr. Schwak from Franklin University Switzerland for a guest lecture. In this lecture entitled ‘Exporting K- quarantine: Korea’s promotion of its COVID management strategy’, Dr. Schwak explored the South Korean government’s recent strategy to share its COVID-19 policies with foreign counterparts. Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, Korea has initially been one of the few countries to limit the spread of the disease. Many state leaders have turned to the Moon government to ask for help in dealing with the health crisis.

 

The Korean government has expressed its formula for fighting the disease as ‘trace, test and treat’ (TTT), and it is currently devising a strategy to export this approach through the ‘K-Quarantine’ model. This talk discussed how the export of ‘K-Quarantine’ fits Moon Jae-in’s strategy of technological leadership and how it responds to Korean administrations’ decades-old export of Korea’s economic development experience. It also showed that ‘K-quarantine’ is a commercial strategy to secure markets for Korea’s health industries, and a promotional strategy in line with Korea’s competitiveness and nation branding concerns. The talk was followed by a Q&A session with faculty and graduate students from the Department.  

Prof. Fintan Hoey

Prof. Fintan Hoey is currently part of an exciting global research consortium on the Constitutional History of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York to which I will be contributing a study of Japan’s role in the emergence of the treaty regime. The project will involve workshops in Southhampton, UK and Washington DC and will result in a major publication on the NPT as well as a series of policy background briefing papers for participants in the Treaty’s Review Conference. 

Professor Schwak interviewed on France Culture radio | South Korea: the power of industrial dynasties

Professor Juliette Schwak from the Division of Communication, History and Politics at Franklin has recently been interviewed in the ‘Cultures Monde’ program of the French national radio "France Culture." 

The episode was part of a series on the politics of Made in Asia focusing on South Korean industrial dynasties, the chaebol. Professor Schwak is a specialist in South Korea’s political economy, and she has published several articles in leading outlets on state-business relationships in South Korea. In particular, she has recently explored the challenges of reforming the chaebol to limit their dominance over South Korea’s economy. 

 

In the program, she discusses chaebol’s weight in South Korea’s economy and the criticisms and reform attempts faced since the country’s democratization in the late 1980s. As she explains in the program: "The chaebol benefit from a certain aura because they embody South Korea’s economic miracle, and many South Koreans are proud of their achievements. At the same time there is strong public resentment against the chaebol: they make up more than 80% of Korea’s GDP but they only create about 10% of all jobs in the country. Many South Koreans also see them as concentrating economic opportunities and creating social inequalities. And on the other side of the political spectrum, economic liberals accuse the chaebol of hindering industrial innovation." 

French-speakers can listen to the program’s podcast: Corée du Sud: le pouvoir des dynasties industrielles - Ép. 4/4 - La force du Made in Asia

The role of (negative) emotions in group formation processes

Profs Bernd Bucher and Juliette Schwak are collaborating with Prof. Giulia Miniero (Division of Business and Economics) on a research project focused on the role of (negative) emotions in group formation processes. Adopting a discourse analysis methodology, this project takes a processual-relational perspective and specifically focuses on ‘practices of hating’ in online forums to better understand the relationship of cognitive and emotional dimensions of actions and their role in generating and upholding group cohesion. Research workshops with invited participants are currently planned for the 2021-2022 academic year.

Grant-funded Research | Pandemics and Borders

Franklin University Switzerland is leading a two-year research project funded by the Swiss Network for International Studies (SNIS) entitled “Pandemics as Driver towards Modern Borders and International Collaboration in 19th Century Mediterranean and South-Eastern European Periphery.” The project is led by Franklin’s Professor Marcus Pyka, as Coordinator, and Professor Bernd Bucher, as Co-coordinator, and supported by fellow post-doctoral researcher Dr. Giorgio Ennas as principal investigator.

The project team will be focusing on understanding the complex interrelations of managing pandemics and the creation of national borders in the 19th century, especially in the Mediterranean and South-Eastern Europe. The research deals with how sanitary and quarantine measures were in the past linked to political and diplomatic decisions and how these were tied to the creation of national identities and borders. Simultaneously, it traces how international cooperation between states became possible. At base, the research aims to answer and examine the following questions:

  • How did attempts at sanitary control impact the emergence of national identities and borders between states?
  • How were bordering practices tied to international cooperation efforts?
  • What were the (unintended) consequences of pandemic control measures on the perception and practice of borders more generally?

LEARN MORE

Open Divisional meetings and the Research Forum

The Division of Communication, History and Politics now regularly conducts divisional meetings that focus on faculty research projects and that are open to students and faculty from other divisions.

At a broader level, we also traditionally organize the FUS Research Forum which aims to provide FUS faculty members across disciplines with a platform to discuss research in its early stages and to enter into an ongoing intellectual exchange. Over the years we have had many contributions with topics ranging from a comparative lexical-stylistic analysis of William Shakespeare and John Florio to grasping the development of voter behavior in Germany, to empirically measuring how European Banks work in practice.

Should you be interested in setting up a Research Forum, please contact: bbucher@faculty.fus.edu

Lecture Series

Thanks to the support of our Trustee Laurent Belet, Prof. Bucher and the politics faculty regularly organize public lectures focusing on contemporary challenges and possible solutions. Over the course of each academic year, we invite leading scholars from diverse disciplines which addressed not only Franklin students and faculty, but Alumni and the Lugano community at large.

Some of our past speakers include:

  • Prof. Dr. Jean-Patrick Villeneuve (USI): Managing in a Glass House - The Limits of Transparency
  • Prof. James W. Davis PhD (University of St. Gallen): The Future of War
  • Dr. Beatrice Eugster (University of Bern): Are Swiss islamophobic?  A description and explanation of anti-Muslim attitudes in Switzerland
  • Stephen Browne (FUNDS): Can the UN be reformed?
  • PD Dr. Martin Beckstein (University of Zurich): How to Immunize the Democratic Community
  • Dr. Julian Eckl (University of St. Gallen): Zooming in on the Challenges of Global Health Governance Practitioners
  • Dr. Sarah Son (University of Sheffield): Looking at North Korea from the Sky: Geospatial Mapping in North Korean Human Rights Monitoring
Our Publications

Discover the full range of our faculty's recent publications, organized by year. Academics most generally are very happy to discuss their work, and so are we. So please reach out if you are intrigued by a specific publication or a faculty member's research project.

Highlighted

Connecting the Two Seas: Negotiating an International Modus Vivendi – Italian and Ottoman Diplomacies in the Suez-Red Sea Area

 

Dr. Giorgio Ennas contributed to the publication of the book Italy and the Suez Canal. From the Mid-Nineteenth Century to the Cold War. A Mediterranean History (Edited by Barbara Curli) writing the chapter Connecting the Two Seas: Negotiating an International Modus Vivendi – Italian and Ottoman Diplomacies in the Suez-Red Sea Area.

In this chapter, Dr. Giorgio Ennas analyses the creation of a new inter-imperial border and the search for a new modus vivendi between the Ottoman empire and the Kingdom of Italy in the 19th century. Moreover, he describes the diplomatic negotiations behind the transformation of the political status of the Eastern Mediterranean, Suez Canal and Red Sea areas between the second half of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century. He shows how the opening of the Suez Canal produced an effective expansion of the Eastern Mediterranean geopolitical area, which gradually included the Red Sea.

Dr. Bernd Bucher and Dr. Julian Eckl publishing in “International Theory”

Conceptualizing and examining the role of world sports events in international society.

Dr. Bernd Bucher and Dr. Julian Eckl, from the University of St. Gallen, have recently published in the prestigious journal, “International Theory”, Cambridge University Presses’ interdisciplinary and academic journal, which promotes theoretical scholarship about the positive, legal, and normative aspects of world politics respectively.

The article, entitled “Football's contribution to international order: The ludic and festive reproduction of international society by world societal actors” examines the role of world sport events in reproducing international society as a whole, not just individual states. The analysis of the role of world sport events, especially FIFA's World Cup and the infrastructure of football, leads to the conclusion that these allow for the ludic and festive reproduction of key primary institutions, while making international society experienceable as competition-based practices footing on shared norms and values.
 

Dr. Bucher commented: “This study is primarily about better understanding the role of diverse types of actors in (de)stabilizing international order. As such, our contribution mainly aims to advance conceptual debates concerning the relationship between international and world society. We really enjoyed writing a piece that will also be of interest to those working on rituals and the sociology of sports. It was a great opportunity to work on a project that neither of us could have written alone, and it was great taking this piece on the road to international conferences, especially because the empirical focus of the article is not what one would expect of either Julian or myself. We were really pleased with the review and publication process, not least because we had research and proof-reading support from Franklin student Danielle Lopez-Cecetaite in the final stages of the project. Involving students at the undergraduate level in research is really a unique feature of Franklin, and a great example of how to integrate teaching and research in a mutually beneficial way.”

The article is now available on the International Theory homepage and will go into print in the course of the year.

Globalization and Economic Transformation in Brazil: The Role of Human Capital

Prof. Roberto Cordon has contributed a chapter entitled Globalization and Economic Transformation in Brazil: The Role of Human Capital (co-written with Prof. Nicolas Depetris Chauvin of the Haute École de Gestion, Geneva) to the book “Towards a human-centred agenda: Human resource management in the BRICS countries in the face of global challenges", published by the International Labor Organization (ILO).

This research project was conducted in conjunction with researchers from seven universities around the world and sponsored by the ILO. Prof. Cordon presented his work at the World Congress of the International Labor and Employment Relations Association (ILERA) in June 2021, and addressed related issues at the India Global Dialogue in February 2021, sponsored by The Diplomatist magazine.

Other Publications

Forthcoming

Professor Roberto Cordon
Cordon, R. & Warren, A., et al., "Stakeholder Perceptions in Sub-Sahara Africa of Private Financial Assistance for Health and Principles of Aid Effectiveness." Submitted to the International Journal of Health Policy and Management.  (conditional acceptance)

Professor Morris Mottale
Mottale, M. (Forthcoming 2022). Archaeology, Heritage, and International Conflict. Silvio Zamorani, Milano, Italy.
Mottale, M. (Forthcoming 2022). Italy and Mediterranean Security: Foreign Policy Challenges. Franco Angeli, Milano, Italy.

Professor Juliette Schwak
Schwak, J. Forthcoming, ‘Exporting the will to compete in Korea’s global Saemaul Undong’, Journal of Contemporary Asia.

Professor Satomi Sugiyama
Sugiyama, S. (forthcoming in 2021). The Apparatgeist of Pepper-kun: An exploration of emerging cultural meanings of a social robot in Japan. In J. E. Katz, J. Floyd, & K. Schiepers (eds.),  Perceiving the Future through New Communication Technologies: Robots, AI and Everyday Life. Palgrave-Macmillan.  

2021

Professor Fintan Hoey

Hoey, F. (2021). ‘The ‘Conceit of Controllability’: Nuclear diplomacy, Japan’s plutonium reprocessing ambitions and U.S. proliferation fears, 1974-1978.’ History and Technology 31, 1: 44-66. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07341512.2021.1882126.

Professor Morris Mottale

Mottale, M. (2021). “Archaeology, Heritage, and International Conflict.” In Inter-Security Forum, December 2020.

Professor Marcus Pyka

Pyka, M. (2021). Unser Standpunkt südlich der Alpen. Zur Spitteler-Rezeption in der italienischen Schweiz [Our Swiss Point of View as Seen from South oft he Alps. On the Reception of Spitteler in Italian-Speaking Switzerland.]” In Zur Aktualität von Spittelers Texten. Komparatistische Perspektiven, ed. Stefanie LeuenbergerColloquium Helveticum, vol. 50, pp. 91-108. Bielefeld: Aisthesis.

Pyka, M. (2021). “In the Shadow of Napoleon: the Reception of Josephus in the Writings of Jost, Salvador, and Graetz.” In Josephus in Modern Jewish Culture, ed. by Andrea Schatz, pp. 185-217. Leiden and Boston: Brill.

Professor Juliette Schwak

Schwak, J. (2021). ‘Domesticating competitive common sense: nation branding discourses, policy-makers and promotional consultants in Korea’, Global Society, 35 (2): 247-268.

Schwak, J. (2021). ‘Foreign aid and discourses of National Social Responsibility: Evidence from South Korea’, Journal of Global Ethics, Online First. https://doi.org/10.1080/17449626.2021.1946126

Schwak, J. (2021). ‘K-Quarantine: exporting South Korea’s COVID-19 management strategy’, East Asia Forum, 11 March 2021.

Schwak, J. (2021). ‘Unlocking Start-Ups: South Korea’s Efforts to Curb the Dominance of Chaebol’, Commentary with Francesca Frassineti, Istituto Per Gli Studi di Politica Internazionale (ISPI), 19 April.

2020

Professor Bernd Bucher

Bucher, B. (2020). Football’s Contribution to International Order: The Ludic and Festive Reproduction of International Society by World Societal Actors (with Julian Eckl). International Theory. Available on First View.

Professor Fintan Hoey

Hoey, F. (2020,  November) H-Diplo Article Review 1003 on Kitamura. “Runaway Orientalism: MGM’s Teahouse and U.S.-Japanese Relations in the 1950s” and on Nishikawa. “The Origin of the U.S-Japan Dispute over the Whaling Moratorium.” https://hdiplo.org/to/AR1003.

Hoey, F. (2020, September). H-Diplo Article Review 979 on Aldous. “The Anatomy of Allied Occupation: Contesting the Resumption of Japanese Antarctic Whaling, 1945-52.” https://hdiplo.org/to/AR979.

Hoey, F. ‘Japan and the NPT: From Target to Champion.’ Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference, 2020, Carnegie Corporation of New York NPT Constitutional History Consortium. Policy Background Brief.

Hoey, F. (2020, January). ‘Review by Fintan Hoey,’ H-Diplo Roundtable XXI-23 on How to Reach Japan by Subway: America’s Fascination with Japanese Culture, 1945-1965 and on Consuming Japan: Popular Culture and the Globalizing of 1980s America. https://hdiplo.org/to/RT21-23.

Professor Morris Mottale

Mottale, M. (2020). “Middle East: New Configuration of Power in the Post-trump Era.” In Inter-Security Forum. December 2020.

Mottale, M. (2020, November). “Medio Oriente: origini ed effetti di una pace inattesa.” Harvard Business Review Italy.

Mottale, M. (2020, February/March). “Iran and Israel.” Limes.  

Professor Juliette Schwak

Schwak, J. (2020) ‘A Democratic tour de force: How the Korean State Successfully Limited the Spread of COVID-19’, Policy Paper Asie.Visions, n°117, November 2020, French Institute of International Relations.

Schwak, J. (2020) ‘Chaebol reform still an uphill battle after Lee Kun-hee’, East Asia Forum, 4 December.

Schwak, J. (2020). ‘Coronavirus en Corée du Sud : quand la population fait confiance à l'État.’ Asialyst, May 2020.

Schwak, J. (2020) Co-authored with Iain Watson, ‘Materiality, Territory and Sovereignty: Responding to Contradictory Water Security Issues in the Mekong Region’, Asian International Studies Review, 21 (1): 25-45.

Schwak, J. (2020). ‘Film in an International Political Economy classroom: for a critical pedagogy of the everyday’, Review of International Political Economy, 27 (6): 1330-1353.

Schwak, J. (2020). ‘La fin du libre-échange?’ [The end of free trade?], Esprit, September.

Schwak, J. (2020). ‘Nothing under the sun: Korea’s developmental promises and neoliberal illusions’, Third World Quarterly, 41 (2): 302-320.

Schwak, J. (2020). ‘Review of Juanita Elias (2020) Gender Politics and the Pursuit of Competitiveness in Malaysia. Women on Board. London: Routledge.’ Journal of Contemporary Asia, Online First.

Schwak, J. (2020). ‘Winning the image war: Korea and Japan’s COVID-19 management strategies’, with Sarah A. Son, East Asia Forum, 4 June.

2019

Professor Fintan Hoey

Hoey, F. (2019, December). ‘Review by Fintan Hoey.’ H-Diplo Roundtable XXI-19 on Jennifer M. Miller. Cold War Democracy: The United States and Japan. https://hdiplo.org/to/RT21-19.

Professor Morris Mottale

Hendrickson, D. C. Review of Republic in Peril: American Empire and the Liberal Tradition. New York, Oxford University Press by Morris Mottale. The International History Review RINH (2019).

Mottale, M. (2019, Summer). “National Images and Mass Media.” H Fusion.

Mottale, M. (2019, January). “The rise of China in the world.” H Fusion.

Mottale, M. (2019, January. “Erdogan’s Turkey as a revisionist Power.” Banilon Italian Journal of Geopolitics.  

Professor Marcus Pyka

Pyka, M. (2019). “The Power of Violins and Rose Petals: The Eurovision Song Contest as an Arena o

of European Crisis.” In Journal of European Studies 49, 3-4:  448-469

Professor Juliette Schwak

Schwak, J. (2019). Co-authored with Iain Watson: ‘Water Security, Riparian Identity and Korean Nation Branding in the Mekong Sub-Region’, Pacific Focus, 34 (2): 153-182.

Schwak, J. (2019). ‘Dangerous Liaisons? State-Chaebol Cooperation and the Global Privatization of Development’,       Journal of Contemporary Asia, 49(1): 104-126.

Schwak, J. (2019). ‘Nation branding en Corée du Sud : ruptures et continuités d’une stratégie promotionnelle’ [Nation branding in South Korea : shifts and continuities in Korea’s promotional strategy], Asia Trends 5.

Professor Satomi Sugiyama

Steinert-Borella, S., & Sugiyama, S. (2019). Introduction: Questions of Taste. intervalla: platform for intellectual exchange, 7, 1-5. 

Sugiyama, S. (2019). Human-Social Robot Interactions: From a Communication and Media Studies Perspective. In C. Linke, & I. Scholte (eds.), Integrative Perspectives on the Change of Mediated Interpersonal Communication. Springer.   

Sugiyama, S. (2019). Wearable technologies: Fashion, size and visibility. In A. Mascio, R. Menarini, S. Reinach, & I. Tolic (eds.), The Size Effect: Measuring Design, Fashion and Media. Mimesis International. 

2018

Professor Bernd Bucher

Bucher, B. (2018). Borders.Inequalities.Legitimacyintervalla: A platform for intellectual exchange.

Professor Morris Mottale

Mottale, M. (2018, June). “The Wars within Islam: Shi’ites and Sunnis in the 21st Century.” H Fusion.

Professor Juliette Schwak

Scwak, J. (2018) ‘All the World’s a Stage: Promotional Politics and Branded Identities in Asia’, Asian Studies Review, 42(4): 648-661.

Schwak, J. (2018). ‘Place Branding’, pedagogical piece for the I-PEEL project (International Political Economy of Everyday Life), funded and managed by the University of Warwick (UK).

Schwak, J. (2018). ‘Review of Michael J. Green (2017) By More Than Providence. Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific Since 1783. New York: Columbia University Press’. Inter-disciplinary Political Studies, 4(1): 239-242.

Schwak, J. (2018). ‘When Public and Private Merge: South Korea and the Chaebol’, AsiaGlobal Online. November 22.

Professor Satomi Sugiyama

Sugiyama, S. (2018). The Emoji and the Management of Social Boundaries. intervalla: platform for intellectual exchange, 6.  

Barile, N., & Sugiyama, S. (2018). Wearing data: From McLuhan’s “extended skin” to the integration between wearable technologies and a new algorithmic sensibility. Fashion Theory: The Journal of Dress, Body & Culture. DOI: 10.1080/1362704X.2018.1514847 

2017

Professor Bernd Bucher

Bucher, B. (2017). Revisiting ‘Identity’ in International Relations: From Identity as Substance to Identifications in Actions (with Ursula Jasper). European Journal of International Relations 23(2): 391- 415.

Professor Roberto Cordon

Cordon, R. &Warren, A., et al. (2017). “The Global Fund's paradigm of oversight, monitoring, and results in Mozambique.” Globalization and Health 13: 89.

Professor Fintan Hoey

Hoey, F. ‘Non-Nuclear Japan? Satō, the NPT, and the US Nuclear Umbrella.’ In Negotiating the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty: Origins of the nuclear order. Edited by Roland Popp, Liviu Horovitz, and Andreas Wenger. London: Routledge, 2017.

Professor Morris Mottale

Mottale, M. (2017, December). “Politics of Ethnicity in North Africa.” H Fusion.

Mottale, M. (2017, October). “Non si sciogliera a breve l’imbroglio medioorientale.” Harvard Business Review Italia.  

Mottale, M. (2017, Spring).  “On Brexit.” The Franklin Gazette.  

Professor Juliette Schwak

Schwak, J. (2017). ‘Review of Gladys Pak Lei Chong (2017) Chinese subjectivities and the Beijing Olympics, London: Rowman and Littlefield’. New Books Asia

2016

Professor Bernd Bucher

Bucher, B.  (2016) ‘On the prospects of Trump being elected’, in the newspaper 20 Minuten.

Professor Roberto Cordon

Cordon, R. & Herden, T. (2016) "The Evolving Nature of Multinational Diplomacy." Diplomatist Annual Edition.

Professor Fintan Hoey

Hoey, F. (2016). ‘Japan and Extended Deterrence. Security and Non-proliferation.’ Journal of Strategic Studies 39, 4: 484-501. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01402390.2016.1168010.

Hoey, F. (2016, September). ‘Review of The Korean War: An international history by Wada Haruki’ International History Review 13, 1. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07075332.2016.1227550.

Professor Morris Mottale

Articles, Books, and Chapters

Graziano, P. R. Review of Europeanization and Domestic Policy Change: The Case of Italy. By Morris Mottale. London, Routledge, 2013. Canadian Journal of Poliitcal Science (2016).

Mottale, M. (2016). “Hobbes, Machiavelli e la Guerra Cibernetica.” Limes.  

Mottale, M. (2016). Interview: Steinmann, Luca. „Ecco perchè gli Stati Uniti difendono Israele.Gli occhi della Guerra.

Professor Juliette Schwak

Schwak, J. (2016).  ‘Branding South Korea in a Competitive World Order: Discourses and Dispositives in Neoliberal Governmentality’, Asian Studies Review, 40 (3): 426-443.

Schwak, J. (2016). ‘L’inquiétant taux de suicide des personnes âgées en Corée du Sud [The worrying suicide rate of the elderly in South Korea]’, Korea Analysis, 9: 24-28.

Schwak, J. (2016). ‘La société coréenne confrontée à l’Islam [Korean society and the challenge of Islam]’, Korea Analysis, 11: 21-25.

Professor Satomi Sugiyama

Barile, N., & Sugiyama, S. (2015). The automation of taste: A theoretical exploration of mobile ICTs and social robots in the context of music consumption. International Journal of Social Robotics, 7 (3), 407-416. 10.1007/s12369-015-0283-1   

Pfadenhauer, M., Sugiyama, S., & Ess, C. M. (2015). Special issue of IJSR on social robots: Form, content, critique. International Journal of Social Robotics. 10.1007/s12369-015-0291-1 

Sugiyama, S. (2015). Kawaii meiru and Maroyaka neko: Mobile emoji for relationship maintenance and aesthetic expressions among Japanese teens. First Monday, 20 (10).

2015

Professor Bernd Bucher

Bucher, B.  (2015) Historical International Relations, in Academic Foresights 14.

Bucher, B. (2015). Moving beyond the substantialist foundations oft he agency-structure dichotomy: Figurational thinking in International Relations. Journal for International Relations and Development. 20 (2) : 408-433.

Bucher, B. (2015). UN-Simulationen in der politikwissenschaftlichen Hochschullehre [Using UN Security Council simulations in teaching introductory courses to IR] (with Martin Koch and Jochen Walter). Zeitschrift für Didaktik der Gesellschaftswissenschaften 6(2): 136-149.

Professor Fintan Hoey

Hoey, F. (2015). ‘Review of Rethinking Japanese Public Opinion and Security: From Pacifism to Realism? by Paul Midford’ International History Review 37, 5: 1104-1105 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07075332.2015.1057971.

Hoey, F. Satō, America and the Cold War: U.S.-Japanese Relations, 1964-1972. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015.

Professor Morris Mottale

Mottale, M. (2015). Dopo il Sionismo, le Radici Evangeliche dell’ Alleanza Usa-Israele in Israele e il Libro. Ed by Lucio Caracciolo. Limes, Roma, Italy.

Mottale, M. (2015). “Dopo il Sionismo, le radici evangleiche dell’alleanza USA – Israele.[History, Religion, and Power Politics: Israel and the United States Today]” Limes: Revisita Italiana di geopolítica.

Mottale, M. (2015). Interview: Steinmann, Luca. „L’Unione europea? È un prodotto americano.Il Giornale.

Mottale, M. (2015). «The Islamic Republic of Iran: The Genesis of its Foreign Policy since 1979.” American Diplomacy.  

Professor Marcus Pyka

Pyka, M. (2015). “Die jüdische Gemeinde in München 1815-1871 [The Jewish community in Munich],“ in Festschrift Israelitische Kultusgemeinde München. München.

Professor Juliette Schwak

Schwak, J. (2015). ‘La multiplication des violences appelle à une réforme en profondeur de l’armée [The multiplication of violence urges for a deep reform of the army]’, Korea Analysis, 6: 23-28.

2014

Professor Bernd Bucher

Bucher, B. (2014). Acting Abstraction – Metaphors, narrative structure and the eclipse of agency. European Journal of International Relations 20(3): 742-765.

Bucher, B. (2014). Liberal Rogues – The pitfalls of Great Power Collaborations and the Stigmatization of Revolutionary Napes in Post-Napoleonic Europe, in Wagner, Wolfgang, Wouter Werner and Michal Onderco (eds.) Deviance in International Relations.Theorizing the Significance of so-called Rogue states.

Professor Roberto Cordon

Cordon, R. (2014). "The End of an Era." Diplomatist Magazine 2(7).

Professor Morris Mottale

Mottale, M. (2014, February). “Marxist Theoretical Debates in Europe During the Cold War. American Diplomacy.

Mottale, M. (2014, May). “Saudi Arabia’s Foreign policy and its Security Challenges.” Diplomacy and Foreign Affairs.  

Mottale, M. (2014, June). “The Middle East in 2014: A Guide for the Perplexed.” Diplomacy and Foreign Affairs.

Mottale, M. (2014, June). “Sunnis and Shiites: The Juhadi Spring in the Middle East.Diplomacy and Foreign Affairs.

Mottale, M. (2014, June). “International Security and the Asian Pivot: The United States and China.Diplomacy and Foreign Affairs.

Professor Juliette Schwak

Schwak, J, (2014) ‘Privatisation des entreprises publiques: le cas de Korea Development Bank [Privatization of public companies: the case of Korea Development Bank]’, Korea Analysis, 3: 14-19.

2013

Professor Morris Mottale

Mottale, M. (2013, April). “The End of History and the Clash of Civilizations Revisited.” Diplomacy and Foreign Affairs.

Mottale, M. (2013, May). “Global impact of the European Union.” Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Diplomatist.

Mottale, M. (2013, May). “Iran and the Failure of American Sanctions.” Diplomacy and Foreign Affairs.  

Mottale, M. (2013, July). “Iran and the Failure of American Sanctions.” Diplomacy and Foreign Affairs Magazine.  

Mottale, M. (2013, October). “68th UN General Assembly Agenda and Expectations.” Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Diplomatist.

Mottale, M. (2013, November). «Leveraging American Security Policy in the Caribbean: Rafael Trujillo the Axis Threat and European Refugees in the 1930s.” American Diplomacy.

Mottale, M. (2013, November). “Mediterranean Security and Italy’s Political Instability.” Diplomacy and Foreign Affairs.

Mottale, M. (2013, September). “Oman: Tradition, Modernity, and Stability.” Diplomacy and Foreign Affairs.

Mottale, M. (2013) Wading Through Conflict: American Foreign Policy & the Middle East. Silvio Zamorani, Torino, Italy.

Professor Satomi Sugiyama

Sugiyama, S. (2013). Melding with the self, melding with relational partners, and turning into a quasi-social robot: A Japanese case study of people’s experiences of emotion and mobile devices. intervalla: platform for intellectual exchange, 1, 71-84.

Sugiyama, S., & Vincent, J. (2013). Social robots and emotion: transcending the boundary between humans and ICTs. intervalla: platform for intellectual exchange, 1, 1-6.

2012

Professor Bernd Bucher

Bucher, B. (2012). Figurational Sociology and the Democratic Peace – Holy Allies and Liberal Threats. Human Figurations 1 (2).

Professor Fintan Hoey

Hoey, F.  (2012). ‘The Nixon Doctrine and Nakasone Yasuhiro’s Unsuccessful Challenge to Japan’s Defense Policy, 1969-1971.’ The Journal of American-East Asian Relations 19, 1: 52-74. DOI.

Professor Satomi Sugiyama

Sugiyama, S. (2012).  Staying connected.  Kurylo, A. (Ed.) Inter/Cultural Communication:Representation and Construction of Culture in Everyday Interaction (pp. 265-266).  Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. (a brief essay contribution to a textbook for undergraduate students).

2011

Professor Bernd Bucher

Bucher, B. (2011). Processual-Relational Thinking and Figurational Sociology in Social Constructivism: The Rogueization of Liberal and Illiberal States. Bamberg: Difo Druck.

Professor Morris Mottale

Mottale, M. (2011). “Iran’s Clerical Regime’s ‘Jewish Problem’” Democracy and Security 7.

Mottale, M. (2011). Iran: The Legacy of the Islamic Revolution. University Press of America, Lanham, Maryland. Rowan and Littlefield, New York.

Mottale, M. (2011, July). “Marketing A Nation: An Economic Necessity.” Bizceos. Also published in Arabic in The Gulf Itmes.

Professor Satomi Sugiyama

Sugiyama, S. (2011). Interpersonal communication beyond geographical constraints: A case of college students who maintain geographically dispersed relationships.  In R. Ling & S. W. Campbell (Eds.) Mobile Communication Research Annual Volume II: Bringing Us Together or Tearing Us Apart? (pp. 271-292).  New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction.

2010

Professor Morris Mottale

Curtis, M. Review of Orientalism and Islam: European Thinkers on Oriental Despotism in the Middle East and India. By Morris Mottale. Cambridge University Press. Canadian Journal of Political Science 43, 1 (2010).

Dorman, A. M. et al. Review of The Future of Tranatlantic Relations: Perceptions, Policy, and Practice. By Morris Mottale. Stanford University Press. Democracy and Dissent 8, 1 (2010).

Mottale, M. (2010, September). “V.S. Naipaul and Islam.” Caribbean Quarterly.

Mottale, M. (2010, April). “The Birth of a New Class.” Al Jazeera.

Professor Satomi Sugiyama

Sugiyama, S. (2010).  Fashion and the mobile phone: A study of symbolic meanings of mobile phone for college-age young people across cultures. Hoflich, J.  R., Kircher, G. F., Linke, C., and Schlote, I (Eds.). Mobile Media and the Change of Everyday Life(pp. 171-190). Berlin: Peter Lang.
 

Sugiyama, S. (2010).  Seeking equilibrium: A study of how college students with diverse cultural backgrounds experience mobile communication in everyday life.  Encyclopaideia: Journal of Phenomenology and Education, 27 (2), 133-154. 

OTHER

2009

Professor Fintan Hoey

Hoey, F. (2009, August). Review of Historical Dictionary of United States-Japanese Relations by John Van Sant, Peter Mauch, and Yoneyuki Sugita. H-US-Japan, H-Net Reviews. http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=23063.

Professor Satomi Sugiyama

Sugiyama, S. (2009). The decorated mobile phone and emotional attachment for Japanese youths. In J. Vincent, & L. Fortunati (Eds.), Electronic Emotion, the Mediation of Emotion via Information and Communication Technologies (pp. 85-103).  Oxford, Peter Lang.   

2006

Professor Morris Mottale

Mottale, M. (2006, December). “The Quest for Modernity in the Middle East and the Islamic World.” Canadian Journal of Political Science.

Professor Satomi Sugiyama

Katz, J. E., & Sugiyama, S. (2006). Mobile phones as fashion statements: Evidence from student surveys in the US and Japan. New Media and Society, 8 (2), 367-383.  

2005

Professor Satomi Sugiyama

Katz, J. E., & Sugiyama, S. (2005). Mobile phones as fashion statements: The co-creation of mobile communication’s public meaning. In R. Ling & P. Pedersen (Eds.), Mobile Communications: Re-negotiation of the Social Sphere (pp. 63-81)Surrey, UK: Springer.  

2004

Professor Morris Mottale

Milton-Edwards, B. Review of Islam and Politics in the Contemporary World. By Morris Mottale. Polity Press: London, 2004. Canadian Journal of Political Science.

Sadiki, L. Review of The Search for Arab Democracy. By Morris Mottale. Columbia University Press: New York, 2004.

2003

Professor Satomi Sugiyama

Sugiyama, S., & Katz, J. E. (2003). Social conduct, social capital and the mobile phone in the US and Japan: A preliminary exploration via student surveys. In K. Nyiri (Ed.), Mobile Democracy: Essays on Society, Self and Politics (pp.375-386). Vienna: Passagen Verlag. 

2002

Professor Morris Mottale

Mottale, M. (2002, May). “The Politics of OPEC Pricing in the Middle East.” Marine Money.

Professor Satomi Sugiyama

Nogami, A., Moriyama, M., & Sugiyama, S. (2002). Haha ga itta. (Translation, Sirowitz, H. Mother Said.) Chobun-sha, Tokyo, Japan. 

2001

Professor Morris Mottale

Mottale, M, (2001, October). “Oil and History.” Marine Money.

Mottale, M. (2001). The Origins of the Gulf Wars. University Press of America, Lanham, Maryland. Rowan and Littlefield, New York.

1998

Professor Satomi Sugiyama

Sugiyama, S. (1998).  “Jiyuu no hyooshoo: Koofuku-go no nihoneeganiokeru josei no shintai.” (Translation of Joanne Izbicki’s “The Shape of Freedom: The Female Body in Post-Surrender Japanese Cinema”) US-Japan Women’s Journal, 23, 93-130. 

1996

Professor Morris Mottale

Nasrin, T. Review of Shame. By Morris Mottale. Italian Swiss Radio, Rete 2, 1996.

1995

Professor Morris Mottale

Mottale, M. (1993-1995). “Central Asia, the Caucasus, and the Middle East: A Prospective on the 1990s” Foundation for Middle East Studies. Toronto, Canada.

Mottale, M. (1995). Iran: The Political Sociology of the Islamic Revolution. University Press of American, Lanham, Maryland, Rowan and Littlefield, New York.

1993

Professor Roberto Cordon

Cordon, R. (1993). "The Political Framework of Privatizations in Chile." World Bank working paper.

Cordon, R. (1993). "The Reform of Mexican Public Enterprises." World Bank working paper.

1992

Professor Morris Mottale

Millar, F. Review of The Roman Near East. By Morris Mottale. Harvard University Press, Cambridge Massachusetts, 1992. Harvard Review of Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies.

Mottale, M. (1992). “The Middle East After the Second Guld War.” Middle East Focus: 16-18. Presentation of paper on research findings at Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard, and York Center for Strategic Studies in Toronto.

1991

Professor Morris Mottale

Rezun, M Review of Iran at the Crossroads: Global Relations in a Turbulent Decade. By Morris Mottale. Westview Press, Boulder, Colorado, 1990, p. 239. Middle East Focus. 1991: p. 13-15.

1989

Professor Morris Mottale

Sobhani, S. Review of The Pragmatic Entente: Israeli-Iranian Relations 1948-1988. By Morris Mottale. Praeger, New York, 1989, p. 173 and Henry Munson Jr. Islam and Revolution int eh Middle East, Yale University Press, New Haven, 1998, p. 188. Middle East Focus, 1991, p. 16-19.

1987

Professor Morris Mottale

Mottale, M. (1987). “Iran: The Political Sociology of the Islamic Revolution.” Shiloah Institute, Tel Aviv University, Israel.

1986

Professor Morris Mottale

Mottale, M. (1986). The Arms Build-Up in the Persian Guld. University Press of America, Lanham, Maryland, Rowan and Littlefield, New York.

1985

Professor Morris Mottale

Mottahedeh, R. Review of The Mantle of the Prophet: Religion and Politics in Iran. By Morris Mottale. Simon and Schuster, New York, 1985, p. 416. Middle East Focus Fall/Winter 1987, p. 21-27.

1984

Professor Morris Mottale

Cordesman, A. H. Review of The Guld and the Search for Strategic Stability. By Morris Mottale. Boulder, Colorado, Westview Press, 1984. Armed Forces and Society, Spring 1987, p. 464-466.

Mottale, M. (1984). “The Politics of Transcendence: Some Notes on Khomeini’s Totalitarianism.” Archives of North American Society for Social Philosophy.  

1983

Professor Morris Mottale

Mottale, M. (1983). “The Other War.” Middle East Focus 5(6): 12-17.

1982

Professor Morris Mottale

Mottale, M. (1982). “Politics in Post-Revolution Iran.” Middle East Focus 4(5): 17-21.

1979

Professor Morris Mottale

Hoveyda, F. Review of The Fall of the Shah. By Morris Mottale. Trans by Roger Liddel. New York, Wyndham Books, 1979, p. 166. And Amin Saikal .The Rise and Fall of the Shah. Princeton, New Jersey, Princeton University Press, 1980, p. 279. Canadian Defense Quarterly 10 (3). Winter 1980-81, p. 59-60.

1973

Professor Morris Mottale

Glassman, J.D. Review of Arms for the Arabs: The Soviet Union and War in the Middle East. By Morris Mottale. Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins University Press 1973, p. 224. The Canadian Journal of Political Science 11, 4 (1978), p. 913-14.